Skip to main content

Full text of "Air pollution and roadway location, design, and operation : preliminary study of distribution of carbon monoxide on and adjacent to freeways : interim report"

See other formats


} No. FHWA RD-76-141 

i 

POLLUTION AND ROADWAY 
TION, DESIGN, AND OPERATION 

PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON MONOXIDE 
ON AND ADJACENT TO FREEWAYS 






September 1976 
Interim Report 



This document is available to the public 
through the National Technical Information 
Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161 



Prepared for 

FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION 
Offices of Research & Development 
Washington, D. C. 20590 



FOREWORD 



This report discusses the dispersion of carbon monoxide 
from highways and will be of interest to engineers and 
researchers concerned with air quality impact assessment of 
highways . 

The report presents the preliminary results of the 
California Department of Transportation research effort "Air 
Pollution and Roadway Location, Design, and Operation." The 
project was conducted for the Federal Highway Administration, 
Office of Research, Washington, D.C. under Contract DOT-FH-11-7730 

The report has been authored by Andrew J. Ranzieri, 
Senior Materials and Research Engineer, and Gerald R. Bemis, 
Associate Materials and Research Engineer, under the supervision 
of John B. Skog, and later Earl C. Shirley, Supervising 
Materials and Research Engineers. Acknowledgement is given 
to Kenneth 0. Pihkerman ., Associate Air Sanitation Engineer, and 
Robert Breazile, Air Instrumentation Technician for their efforts 
in the installation of the carbon monoxide analyzer and 
development of the operation and calibration procedures. Special 
acknowledgement is given to Messrs. Ian Grant, Jim Warren, 
Rudy Abangan, and Arnold Mahalona of the California Department 
of Transportation, District 7, for their work in the field 
operations. 

j~qY Charles F. Scheffey 

Director, Office of Research 
Federal Highway Administration 



NOTICE 

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the 
Department of Transportation in the interest of information 
exchange. The United States Government assumes no liability 
for its contents or use thereof. 

The contents of this report reflect the views of the Office 
of Research of the Federal Highway Administration, which is 
responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented 
herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official 
views or policy of the Department of Transportation. 

This report does no? constitute a standard, specification, or 
regulation. 



Technical Report Documentation Page 



1. Report Nc 



FHWA-RD-76-141 



2. Government Accession No. 



3. Recipient's Catalog No. 



4. Title and Subtitle 



AIR POLLUTION AND ROADWAY LOCATION, DESIGN 
AND OPERATION - PRELIMINARY STUDY OP 
DISTRIBUTION OP CARBON MONOXIDE ON AND 
ADJACENT TO FREEWAYS 



5. Report Date 

September 1976 



6. Performing Organization Code 



7. Author's) 



A. J.Ranzieri, G.R.Bemis, and E.C.Shirley 



8. Performing Organization Report No. 

CA-DOT-TL- 70 80-2- 75-15 



9. Performing Organization Name and Address 

California Department of Transportation 
Office of Transportation Laboratory 
5900 Folsom Boulevard 
Sacramento, California 95819 



10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS) 

FCP 33F3032 



11. Contract or Grant No. 

DOT-FH-11-7730 



12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Aadress 

Office of Research and Development 
Federal Highway Administration 
U. S. Department of Transportation 
Washington, D. C. 20590 



13. Type of Report and Period Covered 



Interim Report 



14. Sponsoring Agency Code 



15. Supplementary Notes 

FHWA's Contract Manager: K. E. Jones 



16. Abstract 



The air quality measurements used to characterize the temporal 
and spatial distributions of carbon monoxide (CO) downwind from 
highway line sources are discussed. Three different highway 
geometries were monitored within the Los Angeles area. They 
included two depressed sections, an at-grade section and a fill 
section. Measurements for this study, at any one site, consisted 
of (1) as many as 24 carbon monoxide sampling points for the 
integrated one hour CO concentrations, (2) one hour values of 
surface wind speeds and directions, and (3) one hour traffic 
counts. All CO measurements were made using bag sampling 
techniques. The data were analyzed to determine the vertical 
and horizontal dispersion rates, the effects of surface roughness 
on the dispersion of CO and CO spatial distribution during a 
period of relatively high concentrations. The data base collected 
for this study will provide information to verify and calibrate 
line source diffusion models. 




c FP 20 1977 






4 



17. Key Words 

Atmospheric bag sampling and 
material carbon monoxide 
dispersion,' temporal and 
spatial distributions 
dispersion model, CO data base. 



18. Distribution Statement 



No res trie tionsT^"ThTF = d'oc _ uraientr is 
available to the public through the 
National Technical Information 
Service, Springfield, VA 22161 



19. Security Classif. (of this report) 

Unclassified 



20. Security Classif. (of this page) 

Unclassified 



21. No. of Pages 

211 



22. Price 



Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) 



Reproduction of completed page authorized 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -. 1 

INTRODUCTION 3 

CONCLUSIONS 9 

SITE DESCRIPTION. . . . , 11 

Santa Monica Freeway at 4th Avenue 

Pedestrian Overcrossing 21 

Harbor Freeway at 146th Avenue 

Pedestrian Overcrossing 21 

San Diego Freeway at Weigh Station ....,..". 26 

San Diego Freeway at National Blvd 32 

San Diego Freeway at 122nd Street 39 

DATA COLLECTION SCHEME 46 

Carbon Monoxide Bag Sampling . . . . • . 46 

Meterological Data 49 

Traffic Data 49 

DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT 57 

Carbon Monoxide Averaging Time 57 

Exposure of Instrumentation 58 

Design of Sampling Program Associated With 

Changes in. Traffic and Meteorological Conditions . 58 

Sampling Scheme For the Evaluation of CO 68 

Temporal and Spatial Distributions of CO 68 

SYSTEM SETUP AND RELIABILITY 70 



12 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Con't.) 

Page 

Variability of CO Concentration With Location . 70 

Effects of Bag Sampling Time on CO 

Concentrations 70 

Evaluation of Bag Materials in Bag Sampling. . . 73 

Carbon Monoxide Decay With Time 77 

Effect of Types of Tubing on Carbon 

Monoxide Concentrations 78 

DESCRIPTION OP DATA BASE 83 

Meteorological Data Base 83 

Carbon Monoxide Data Base 84 

Traffic Data Base 84 

Time Period of Data Base 86 

Limitations of Data Base 86 

DATA ANALYSIS , 88 

Mixing Cell Variability. , . 88 

Vertical and Horizontal Dispersion Rates .... 100 

Effects of Surface Roughness on Dispersion . . . 106 

Minimal Sampling Plan For Spatial 

Distribution of CO 107 

Spatial Distribution of CO During Periods 

of High Concentrations 116 

Further Statistical Studies 116 

REFERENCES 119 

APPENDIX A - BAG SAMPLING STUDY DATA BASE 121 



111 



LIST OF TABLES 

No. Title Page 

1 Summary of Sites Selected for Bag Sampling 

Study ,.,'.,••'.,., 45 

2 Relationships of Various Averaging Times to 

Hourly Averages 72 

3 Mylar Bags Filled With Zero Gas 74 

4 Mylar Bags Filled With 90 ppm CO 74 

5 Mylar Bags Filled With 23 ppm CO 75 

6 Mylar Bags Filled With Zero Air at 70°F .... 75 

7 Mylar Bags Filled With Zero Air Exposed to 
Environmental Conditions .... 75 

8 Comparison of Scotchpak Bags, Mylar Bags, 

and Opaque Mylar Bags 76 

9 Summary of Variations in NDIR Response When 

Using Scotchpak Bags ...,..., 77 

10 Effects of Sampling Line Materials on NDIR 
Readings 79 

11. Response of NDIR to CO Passed Through Aged 

and New Tubing 82 

12. Time period for Data Base , , 86 

13. Summary of CO Gradient 105 



IV 



LIST OF FIGURES 

No. Title Page 

1 Microscale Region , 3 

2 Tentative Air Quality Sampling Sites ..,.,. 5 

3 Surface Streamlines for December AM 13 

4 Surface Streamlines for December Midday ..... 14 

5 Surface Streamlines for December PM ...... . 15 

6 Surface Streamlines for August AM 16 

7 Surface Streamlines for August Midday ...... 17 

8 Surface Streamlines for August PM 18 

9 Geometries of Site 1 - Santa Monica Freeway 

at 4th Avenue Pedestrian Overcrossing 22 

10 View of Site 1 From Freeway Looking East .... 23 

11 View of Site 1 Looking North and Away 

From Freeway 24 

13 View of Site 1 Looking South and Away 

From Freeway 25 

13 Geometries of Site 2 - Harbor Freeway at 

146th Street Pedestrian Overcrossing 27 

14 Aerodynamic Eddies in Cut Section ........ 28 

15 View of Site 2 From Freeway Looking North .... 29 

16 View of Site 2 From the East Side Looking 

West Towards Freeway 30 

17 View of Site 2 From the West Side Looking 

East Towards Freeway 31 

18 View of Site 3 - San Diego Freeway at Weigh 
Station as Viewed From Freeway 33 



v 



LIST OF FIGURES (Con't.) 
No. Title Page 

19 View of Site 3 From the East Side Looking 

West Towards Freeway ....... 34 

20 View of Sites Looking West Away From Freeway . 35 

21 View of Site 4 ~ San Diego Freeway at National 
Blvd. as Viewed From Freeway Looking North. . . 36 

22 View of Site 4 - East Side Looking East Away 

From Freeway , , . 37 

23 View of Site 4 - East Side Looking West Across 
Freeway . . . . , ,.,...,., 38 

24 Geometries of Site 5 -• San Diego Freeway at 

122nd Ave. 40 

25 Aerodynamic Eddies of Air Flow For Fill 

Section 4l 

26 View of Site 5 From Freeway Looking North . . 42 

27 View of Site 5 - East Side Looking West 

Towards Freeway 43 

28 View of Site 5 - West Side Looking East 

Towards Freeway 44 

29 Setup Below Pedestrian Overcrossing Structure 

For Depressed Freeway Section 47 

30 Typical Off-Freeway Probe Setup . . . r . . . 48 

31 Construction Trailer at Site 1 Housing 

CO Analyzer 50 

32 CO Analyzer in Construction Trailer 51 

33 Mechanical Weather Station at Site 1 52 

34 Close Up View of Mechanical Weather Station . 53 

35 Typical Output From Mechanical Weather 

Station 54 



VI 



LIST OF FIGURES (Con't.) 
No. Title Page 

36 Hand Held Wind System 55 

37 Probe Locations, Santa Monica Freeway at 

4th Ave. P.O.C. Downwind Study 59 

38 Probe Locations, Santa Monica Freeway at 

4th Ave. P.O.C. In-Section Study 60 

39 Probe Locations, Harbor Freeway at l46th Ave. 
Downwind Study 6l 

40 Probe Locations, Harbor Freeway at l46th Ave. 
In-Section Study ........ 62 

41 Probe Locations, San Diego Freeway at Weigh 
Station Downwind Study 63 

42 Probe Locations, San Diego Freeway at National 

Blvd. Downwind Study 64 

43 Probe Locations, San Diego Freeway at National 

Blvd. In-Section Study 65 

44 Probe Locations San Diego Freeway at 122nd Ave. 
Downwind Study 66 

45 Probe Locations, San Diego Freeway at 122nd Ave. 
In-Section Study 6f 

46 Variability of CO Concentration With Location . 71 

47 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at 4th Ave. 
P.O.C. In-Section Study 91 

48 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at 4th Ave. 
P.O.C. Downwind Study . . . 92 

49 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at l46th Ave. 
P.O.C. In-Section Study . . 93 

50 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at l46th Ave. 
P.O.C. Downwind Study 94 



Vll 



LIST OF FIGURES (Con*t.) 
No, Title Page 

51 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at Weigh 
Station Downwind Study 95 

52 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at National 

Blvd. In-Section Study . . . . 96 

53 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at National 

Blvd. Downwind Study 97 

54 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at 122nd Ave. 
In-Section Study 98 

55 Mean and Standard Deviations of CO at 122nd Ave. 
Downwind Study 99 

56 Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of CO For 

4th Ave. P.O.C 101 

57 Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of CO For 

146th Ave. P.O.C 102 

58 Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of CO For 

122nd Ave 103 

59 Spatial Distribution of CO at 4th Ave. P.O.C. . 108 

60 Spatial Distribution of CO at l46th Ave. P.O.C. 109 

61 Spatial Distribution of CO at Weigh Station . . 110 

62 Spatial Distribution of CO at 122nd Ave Ill 

63 Attainment of Background Levels of CO-At-Grade 
Sections in Flat Open Areas 112 

64 Attainment of Background Levels of CO-Depressed 
Sections in Urban Areas 113 

65 Attainment of Background Levels of CO-Fill 
Sections in Flat Open Areas 114 

66 Typical Sampling Plans to Measure the Spatial 
Distribution of CO On and Near Highways 115 



vm 



LIST OF FIGURES (Con't.) 

No, Title Page 

67 CO During a Period of High Concentration in 

the Entire Los Angeles Area 117 



IX 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

This report has been authored by Andrew J. Ranzieri, 
Senior Materials and Research Engineer, and Gerald R. Bemis, 
Associate Materials and Research Engineer, under the 
supervision of John B. Skog, and later Earl C. Shirley, 
Supervising Materials and Research Engineers. 

The authors wish to express their appreciation to 
Kenneth 0. Pinkerraan, Associate Air Sanitation Engineer, 
and Robert Breazile, Air Instrumentation Technician, for 
their efforts in installation of the CO analyzer in the 
trailer and development of the operation and calibration 
procedures. 

Special acknowledgement is given to Ian Grant, Jim 
Warren, Rudy Abangan and Arnold Mahalona of the California 
Department of Transportation, District 07 > for their work 
in the field operations. Without their innovative efforts 
this project would have been much more difficult. 



£L -C *- "O 



2 £ 






r?l S S 

E S E E .* 



Q. (T C> ~ 



2 "- o 

S £ | 

E i g °. 

i £ is 



V) 








■v 


0) 














QJ 








E 


£ 


•z 


V) 


(A 


VI 


o 


o 










Xi 


n 














b 


— 


-H 


— 


u 


u 



2 E 



E E E 





<x> 


tO -i 
















O 






O 






o . 

CD 






_ O 










o . 




















o - 


_ o 




1 




- 






o . 


L o 



< 

z 
o 

CO 

cc 



CZ 

lllllllll 


zz 

llll 


llll 


iz 

llll 


llll 


oz 

llll 


llll 


61 
[III 


llll 


81 
llll 


llll 


llll 


llll 


91 
llll 


llll 


91 
llll 


llll 


H 

llll 


llll 


CI 
llll 


llll 


Zl 

llll 


llll 


II 

II!! 


llll 


01 

llll 


llll 


6 

llll 


llll 


8 

llll 


llll 


i 

llll 


llll 


9 

llll 


llll 


S 

llll 


llll 


llll 


llll 


E 

llll 


llll 


Z 

llll 


llll 


\ 

llll llll 



o 
u 



o 
cc 



TIT 



TIT 



TIT 



TIT 



HT 



NT 



I'lT 



I'l'l 



1 inches 



E E E 



e £ ; • 



'§. ! 5' J 

S E E 2 

O V 0) <U 



O V -D -O 



u) o n u> v 
ko o o <n o 






CO 



o 



V. V. 2 g 

« = S £■ 



en j3 

in vi 



E § 



cr (7 tr D" 



^ C u a u o 



.s "« Ve 



£»-~ oao-o^ 



™ <¥ U "O 



Ed 



S? 



3? 






! 



INTRODUCTION 

The California Department of Transportation, 
Transportation Laboratory, has a research project funded by 
the Federal Highway Administration for the purpose of 
developing methods and criteria to consider air quality 
when planning, designing, and operating a highway system. 

The tasks involved in this project are: 

A. Establishment of a Project Advisory Committee. 

B. Technical Background Review and Planning - Adapt 
existing line source models and develop new 
models for verification using data from this 
project. 

C. Development of a Data Acquisition Program and 
Instrumentation. 

D. Site Selection. 

E. Field measurements of traffic, pollutants emitted 
from vehicles (gases and particulates), and 
micrometeorology . 

F. Analysis of Results, including evaluation of 
line source models. 

All of the tasks above are aimed at providing a data 
base for line source model validation. The models used to 
predict pollutant concentrations relate (1) traffic volumes, 
(2) emission factors, C3) meteorology, and (4) type of 
highway design. The modeling efforts of this research 
project are limited to the microscale region. The microscale 
region can be defined as the region extending from the point 
where the pollutants are generated by the traffic (highway) 
downwind to the point where ambient pollutant levels are 
again reached. Figure 1 illustrates the microscale region. 

For this research project a total of 18 possible 
experimental sites were selected, all located in the Los 
Angeles Basin. These sites consist of highways located on 
(1) fill sections, (2) cut sections, and (3) at grade 
sections. 

Most of the aerometric data collected on this project 
were taken in the Los Angeles area along freeway routes 



A 4 1 a 1 4 j s u a s 




+ 

_i 

UJ 

> 

UJ 



<0 

X 



o 
u. 



z w 

2 < 



O 

a. 



UJ 

o 



x < 



_i 






UJ 
O 

z 
o 
o 



< 

3 



o 

Q. 



< 

O 

H 



CD 

LU 

cc: 

a 

<«: 
c_> 

o 

cc: 



<_D 



which are a part of a Freeway Surveillance and Control 
Project that includes three of the most heavily traveled 
freeways in Los Angeles. They are the Santa Monica, San 
Diego, and Harbor Freeways, as shown in Figure 2. This 
surveillance loop project is 42 miles in length; has within 
or near its boundaries 56 freeway interchanges and a portion 
of downtown Los Angeles; and passes in the vicinity of Los 
Angeles International Airport, The electronic surveillance 
system is comprised of a total of 700 traffic sensors embedded 
in the freeway at 1/2-mile intervals. The information is 
telemetered to a central computer control over telephone 
lines. This surveillance project provides traffic data on 
an almost continuous basis for use in this research project. 
Most of the experimental air quality sites are located along 
the 42-mile loop; however, a few locations are outside of 
the loop area to allow the monitoring of all types of 
highway design. 

For each experimental site the following meteorological 
parameters are monitored: 

1. Wind speed and direction 

2. Wind shear 

3. Vertical temperature gradients 

4. Relative humidity 

5. Solar radiation 

6. Atmospheric turbulence 

For each experimental site the following air pollutants 
are monitored: 

1. Carbon monoxide (CO) 

2. Ozone (OO 

3. Total hydrocarbons (.THC) 

4. Methane (CH^) 

5. . Nitrogen Oxide (NO) 

6. Nitrogen Dioxide (NOp) 



o 
o 




777777 



LOS ANGELES 
AND VICINITY 

(i) = 4TH AVE 
(D = I46TH ST 
(|> = WEIGH STA 
(4> = NATIONAL BLVD 
(5} = 122 ND ST 

-sites monitored 

-candidate sites 
FIG. 2 



TENTATIVE AIR QUALITY SAMPLING SITES 



6 



7. Total Suspended Particulates 

8. Sulphur 

9. Lead 

Measurements are made using instruments housed in two 
mobile laboratories. These vans have the capacity to draw 
in samples of surrounding air for analysis as well as the 
capacity to analyze bag samples which are taken at other 
locations and transported to the mobile laboratories. The 
vans are equipped with a 45-foot tower to monitor the 
meteorological parameters. The mobile van also houses a 
mini- computer. The primary purpose of the mini-computer is 
to (1) control approximately 200 valves, (2) serve as a 
data acquisition system and store the data on magnetic tape 
to be processed later, and (3) to completely automate the 
operation of the van. 

There are two types of sampling systems used, involving 
continuous and bag sampling techniques. There are a maximum 
of 15 air monitoring probes that can be used to completely 
describe the highway configuration under study. The only 
pollutant to be monitored almost continuously is carbon 
monoxide. Bag sampling is used where the distance limita- 
tion from the freeway does not permit the use of a 
continuous sampling probe. The other pollutants are 
monitored only once every hour. However, the frequency 
of the measurements can increase depending on the number 
of probes to be used to describe the dispersion characteristics 
The research project is more fully described in the interim 
report titled "Air Pollution and Roadway Location, Design 
and Operation - Overview of Project" ( jL ) . 

In order to adequately design an experiment of this 
magnitude, it is necessary to know the variability of 
pollutant concentrations within the microscale region of 
study. Unfortunately, at the time this research was proposed, 
there was little empirical information on the dispersion 
characteristics of pollutants generated from highways. 
Because of lack of quantitative data, the California 
Department of Transportation's Research Laboratory deemed 
it necessary to conduct a preliminary study with the 
following objectives: 

1) To define the microscale region. 



2) To determine the optimum number of probes to 
measure the carbon monoxide dispersion 
characteristics Con highway downwind) for 
different types of highway designs and surface 
roughness* characteristics. 

3). To gain actual field experience in using air 
quality instrumentation and bag sampling 
procedures prior to large scale sampling. 

4) To qualitatively describe the transport and 
diffusion of CO downwind of roadways. 

7) To develop a data bank of pollutant concentrations, 
meteorological parameters 9 and traffic volumes that 
could be used to begin the initial calibration of 
mathematical models to predict the pollutant 
concentration generated from highways. 

To meet the objectives above, an air quality investi- 
gation was made using carbon monoxide as a tracer gas. There 
were five experimental sites monitored - all located in Los 
Angeles, Three sites were located on the San Diego Freeway, 
one on the Harbor Freeway, and one on the Santa Monica 
Freeway. These were sites selected (out of a possible 18) 
at the second meeting of the Project's Advisory Committee (2.) 
as being representative of typical highway design for depressed 
sections, fill sections, and at-grade sections. All sites 
except for one were on the Surveillance Loop Project. A 
total of 405 hours of monitoring provided data from all sites. 
Site locations are shown on Figure 2. 



8 



CONCLUSIONS 

The following conclusions were derived from this 
preliminary CO study. They are based on the data collected 
during the period from May through October 1972. These 
conclusions are subject to the traffic and meteorological 
conditions encountered in the field and should not be 
considered representative of other geographic areas unless 
these parameters have been normalized. 

1) Sampling probes to describe the mixing cell 
concentrations should be located at both shoulders 
and the median at heights of 4 and 12 feet above 
the pavement. This also allows analysis of CO 
levels to which drivers are subjected while 
driving in areas of high traffic density. 

2) Sampling probes to describe the downwind transport 
and diffusion characteristics of CO should be 
spaced 100 to 150 feet apart up to distances of 
400 to 500 feet away from highways. 

3l Background levels of CO in urban areas are 

generally reached at about 300 feet downwind from 
the edge of the traveled roadway. This is 
attributed to the induced roughness characteristics 
of the land uses in urban areas and the differences 
in heat fluxes caused by man-made materials. 

4) Background CO levels in relatively flat rural areas 
are generally reached at distances greater than 
400 feet downwind from the edge of the traveled 
roadway. This is attributed to the fact that 
there is less ground level turbulence as compared 
to urban areas. 

5) Within the air monitoring capabilities of this 
project there is no observed downwind vertical 
gradient of CO from the ground surface up to 29 
feet for urban and rural areas. The thorough 
mixing in this region is most probably caused by 
mechanical and thermal turbulence. 

6) The vertical diffusion rates of CO are about 3 
times larger than the horizontal diffusion rates. 
This was observed for highways located in depressed, 
at-grade, and fill sections. 



7) Generally for high, traffic densities Cgreater 
than 13,0-00- vph), the CO concentration coming 
directly off the roadway (mixing cell) ranges 
from 8 to 25 parts per million (ppml above 
background for the conditions monitored. 

8) Downwind CO concentrations 150 feet from the edge 
of traveled way generally range from 1 to 4 ppm 
above ambient levels for both urban and rural 
sites . 

9) Bag sampling for CO using aluminized polyester 
bags gave no significant decay of CO for storage 
times of over 95 hours. 

10) Test results indicate that clear Mylar is undesirable 
for use in bag sampling for CO where the NDIR 
analysis technique is used. Exposure to sunlight 
apparently causes increases in CO readings. 

11) Where new teflon tubing is used for CO intake 
lines, it is recommended that the teflon be 
exposed to atmospheric conditions for at least 
three days prior to use to avoid high indicated 
CO concentrations. Apparently green polyvinyl- 
chloride and tygon tubing can be used as intake 
lines for CO without any observed change in 
indicated CO concentrations. 






10 






SITE DESCRIPTION 

The sites selected for this study represent typical 
highway designs and land use patterns existing adjacent to 
highways. 

The major factors considered in site selection were (1) 
wind flow patterns, C2) background interference for local 
streets, (3) highway geometric design, and (4) monitoring 
feasibility. 

For any air quality study one of the most important 
parameters to consider is meteorology. In preliminary 
microscale studies, we have found that the meteorological 
parameters of most importance are wind speed and direction. 
Analysis of surface wind patterns assisted in selecting sites 
with crosswind and parallel wind conditions with respect to 
the highway alignment. This allows a comparison of the CO 
dispersion characteristics for the extremes in wind directions 
(normal to parallel). Fortunately, the meteorology within 
the Los Angeles area is well documented. There are numerous 
meteorological sources giving historical wind speeds and 
direction in the vicinity of the surveillance project. From 
this information one can construct the surface streamlines 
of winds for different time periods throughout the seasons of 
the year. The meteorological sources include (1) the Los 
Angeles International Airport, (2) Los Angeles Air Pollution 
Control District's (LAAPCD) monitoring stations, and (3) 
studies made by other investigators within the Los Angeles 
Basin. The California Transportation Laboratory, purchased 
five years of meterological data from the LAAPCD and ten 
years of information for Los Angeles International Airport 
from the National Weather Record Center in Nashville, North 
Carolina. These data included wind speed and direction 
information recorded at each station. 

It should be pointed out that most of the APCD stations 
monitoring wind speed and direction have improper exposure 
for measurement of surface winds (3.) . Generally the wind 
systems are located about 6 feet from the roof top of a 
building. These wind systems are subjected to local air flow 
disturbances caused by the building, trees, etc. This has 
been confirmed in studies made by Grisinger C4) . This 
disturbance is probably most pronounced for the light land 
breezes in the morning period. During the strong sea breeze 
regime this effect is probably minimized. However, in spite 
of this, and considering the density of wind systems over our 
study area, this information was used to illustrate the 

11 



general air flow movement. To supplement the LAAPCD stations 
and to assist in designing the experiment, the Transportation 
Laboratory used six mechanical weather stations, manufactured 
by Meteorology Research Incorporated, to continuously record 
wind speed and direction, Before exact locations for the six 
wind systems were determined, a careful field meteorological 
survey was conducted, This survey considered the available 
data and exposure, the possible topographic effects on the air 
flow caused by the Santa Monica Mountains and Palo Verdes 
Hills, and the possible locations of the experimental sites. 
The following sites were selected as being most representative 
to monitor the surface winds for the objectives of this study. 



Location 



Length of Record 



Santa Monica Freeway 
at 6th Avenue 



October 1971 through 
February 19 72 



San Diego Freeway 

at Truck Weigh Station 



August 1971 through 
August 1972 



Harbor Freeway at 
220th Street 



September 1971 through 
December 1971 



Harbor Freeway at 
Rosecrans 



September 1971 through 
February 1972 



Santa Monica Freeway 
at Ethel 



September 1971 through 
January 1972 



San Diego Freeway 
at El Segundo 



January 1972 through 
April 1972 



San Diego Freeway 
at Venice Blvd. 



March 1972 through 
April 1972 



Mechanical problems with the wind systems and time 
limitations prevented continuous monitoring at all sites. 
These wind systems were mounted on light standards and 
telephone poles well above the boundary flow effects of 
houses, buildings, etc. In general, they were about 30 to 
40 feet above the ground surface depending on the surface 
roughness characteristics. 

All of the data from the LAAPCD stations and the 
Transportation Laboratory wind systems were summarized by 
the hour in a tabular wind rose form for each month. From 
this information, monthly surface wind streamline analyses 



12 



were made for time periods associated with certain traffic 
conditions. These time periods were (1) peak morning traffic 
hours CAM). - 0600.-09-0.0, ("21 off-peak traffic hours (midday) 
- 1100-1300, and C3l evening peak traffic hours CPM) - l600- 
180-0. From the streamline analyses, sites could be selected 
for prevailing wind directions ranging from normal to parallel 
with respect to the highway alignment. Figures 3 through 8 
show the surface streamlines for the months of July and 
December for different periods of the day. These months give 
the extreme conditions in surface streamlines. 

Figure 3 illustrates the general flow of the land and 
drainage winds. This is primarily caused by the temperature 
difference between the land and the ocean. These land winds 
generally range from 4 to 6 mph along the coastline and 
decrease somewhat inland. During these wind regimes, surface 
atmospheric conditions are generally stable and ground level 
concentrations of CO may be high. 

Figures 4 and 5 illustrate the general flow during the 
sea breeze regime. This also is primarily caused by the 
difference in temperature of the ocean and land. These sea 
breezes generally range from 8 to 10 mph along the coast and 
decrease somewhat inland. Figures 3 and 4 also illustrate 
the topographic effects that the Palo Verdes Hills have on 
the surface air flow by causing the flow to go around the 
hills. 

Figures 6 through 8 indicate typical conditions that 
exist during the summer months. The morning period (Figure 
6) is generally associated with light winds varying in 
direction. This is a transitory period from a land to sea 
breeze regime. Figures 7 and 8 illustrate the strong summer 
sea breezes generally occurring after midday and ranging 
from 10 to 15 mph along the coast decreasing somewhat inland. 

The following is a summary of the factors considered in 
the final selection of all experimental sites: 

I). Wind Patterns 

1. Prevailing wind speeds and directions 

2. Occurrences of calms or stagnant 
conditions 



13 




////// CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES & VICINITY 



= LAPCD STATION 
= MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 



FIG, 3 SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR DECEMBER AM 



14 




JJJJJ j SURVEILLANCE 8 
CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES 8 VICINITY 



FIG, H SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR DECEMBER MIDDAY 
15 



= LAPCD STATION 

= MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 




/////r/ CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES S VICINITY 



= LAPCD STATION 
= MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 



FIG, 5 SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR DECEMBER PM 
16 




iii ■■ ■ SURVEILLANCE 8 
" CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES a VICINITY 



= LAPCD STATION 
= MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 



FIG. 6 SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR AUGUST AM 
17 




/////r/ CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES 8 VICINITY 



LAPCO STATION 
MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 



FIG. 7 SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR AUGUST MIDDAY 

18 




J)J>>> SURVEILLANCE 8 
CONTROL LOOP 
LOS ANGELES 8 VICINITY 



FIG. 8 SURFACE STREAMLINES FOR AUGUST PM 
19 



= LA PCD STATION 
= MECHANICAL WEATHER 
STATION 



II) Background Interference 

1, Proximity of other freeways and surface 
streets with, respect to sampling site 

2. Proximity of other local sources of air 
pollution, i.e. industry, airports, etc. 

IIll Type of Highway Geometry 

1.. At-grade sections 

2. Fill sections 

3. Cut sections 

4. Viaduct sections 

IV) Land Use Patterns 

1. Single residential areas 

2. Two-story residential area 

3. Commercial areas 

4. Open or semi-rural areas 

V) Monitoring Feasibility 

1. Traffic impedance by equipment and 
field personnel 

2. Time of day or seasonal limitations 

3. Vandalism 

4. Accessibility to sensor points 

5. Cross section coverage 

6. Van parking 

VI) Miscellaneous Considerations 

1. Public exposure to pollution in 
monitored area 

2. Availability of ambient air quality 
and meteorological data 

3. Access to Surveillance Project data 

4. Local aerodynamic effects 

Using the above criteria, five experimental sites were 
selected by the Advisory Committee as previously discussed. 



20 



The following is a description of each site and the 
reasons for its selection. 

Santa Monica Freeway at 4th Ayenue Pedestrian Overcrossing 

This site is a typical example of a depressed section 
located in an urban area. The depth of cut is 2 4 feet. This 
section consists of a 10. lane freeway with two on and off 
ramps for a total of 12 lanes. Figure 9 shows the geometries 
of the section. This site is representative of a highway 
located within a mixed single and two story residential area. 
The heights of the dwellings range from 20 to 30 feet above 
the ground surface. The highway alignment is essentially 
east-west. Based on a surface wind streamline analysis, this 
section has prevailing surface winds (sea breeze) generally 
parallel to the highway alignment from about midday through 
sunset. This allows a study of the parallel wind effects 
during this period. 

During the mornings typical land breezes occur generally 
over the area. This land breeze is generally a crosswind 
with respect to the highway alignment. 

This site is far removed from any other localized 
pollutant source for CO. There are no freeways or main surface 
streets in the immediate area to generate additional CO to 
confound the measurements. The only outside pollutant source 
could be the local people going to work in the morning and 
returning in the evening. However, this should be minor 
compared to the freeway generated pollutants because this 
site is located at the end of a cul-de-sac. This site has a 
pedestrian overcrossing which allows accessibility to locate 
CO sensors on both shoulders and the median of the highway. 
Bag samples can be taken readily along the residential street 
to monitor the horizontal dispersion of CO. There is adequate 
room to park a van, housing all of the instrumentation, on 
both the south and north sides of the freeway. This site is 
on the Surveillance Project from which traffic volumes and 
speed estimates can be obtained. Pictures of this site and 
the surrounding area are shown in Figures 10 to 12. 

Harbor freeway at 146th Avenue Pedestrian Overcrossing 

This site is another typical 8 lane urban depressed 
section. Figure 13 shows the geometries of the section. 
This site is representative of a highway located within a 
single story residential area. The average height of 
dwellings ranges from 15 to 20 feet above the ground surface. 

21 



256 



y/A^y/^, 




24" 



v^/S^//^//^//^A 



162 




\/A$zx$y 



FIG. 9 GEOMETRICS OF SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 
AT 4TH AVE PEDESTRIAN OVERCROSSING 
Gjot to scale) 



22 




FIG 10 VIEW OF SITE 1 FROM FREEWAY 

LOOKING EAST 



23 




FIG. 11 VIEW OF SITE 1 LOOKING NORTH 
AND AWAY FROM FREEWAY 



24 




FIG. 12 VIEW OF SITE 1 LOOKING SOUTH 
AND AWAY FROM FREEWAY 



25 



The highway alignment is essentially a north-south direction. 
One of the most important reasons this site was selected is 
that the prevailing sea breeze is nearly normal to the highway 
alignment, This will allow a study to be made to determine 
the aerodynamic effects of the air flow within the depressed 
section on the CO concentrations to which drivers are subjected 
when using the facilities. It also enables a study of the 
downwind dispersion of CO, This site can be compared to the 
Santa Monica Freeway site for comparisons of CO concentrations 
for parallel and crosswind conditions. These aerodynamic eddies 
are caused by the air flow separation due to the configuration 
of the highway cut. Figure 14 illustrates the aerodynamic 
eddies to be studied. This site is located at the end of a 
cul-de-sac which minimizes the outside pollutant sources other 
than the freeway. The pedestrian overcrossing and residential 
streets provide access to locate sensors on the shoulder and 
median of the highway and in the downwind direction to study 
the dispersion of CO. This site is located on the Surveillance 
Project. Pictures of the site and surrounding area are shown 
in Figures 15 to 17. 

San Diego Freeway at Weigh Station 

This site is typical of an at-grade 8 lane highway 
section. This site is representative of a highway located in 
a rural area with a flat open fetch in the up and downwind 
directions. The area surrounding the highway consists of an 
open grassy field on the east side and a golf course on the 
west side. The total width of highway from edge of pavement 
to edge of pavement is 138 feet. There are no other local 
freeways or surface streets within the immediate area to 
contribute to the pollutant levels other than the highway 
itself. This site was selected to compare the effects of 
different land uses (flat open areas) adjacent to highways 
to those of the other urban sites (residential areas) and to 
evaluate the effects of land use on the dispersion of pollu- 
tants. Study of the surface streamline analysis indicates 
prevailing surface winds are generally in a crosswind direction 
with respect to the highway alignment. 

Pictures of the site and surrounding area are shown in 
Figures 18 through 20. This site is ideal for model validation 
because of the simplicity of the terrain. This site is off 
of the Surveillance Project; however, traffic monitoring pads 
for traffic census are located approximately 1/4 miles from 
the site. Traffic volumes can be obtained from the District 
07 Traffic Department, The CO measurements on the highway 
are limited to both shoulders of the pavement because there 

26 



284 



//A^y/^/i 



22" 



198' 




y/A^x^ 



FIG, B 6E0METRICS OF HARBOR FREEWAY 
AT M6TH ST. PEDESTRIAN OVERCROSSING 

GjOT TO SCALE) 



27 



SURFACE 
WIND 




//y^y^^// 



X/a$#*&/ 



V/^//^//^//^//^A 



FIG. M AERODYNAMIC EDDIES IN CUT SECTION 

ClJOT TO SCALE) 



28 




FIG, 15 VIEW OF SITE 2 FROM FREEWAY 

LOOKING NORTH 



29 




FIG. 16 VIEW OF SITE 2 FROM THE EAST 
SIDE LOOKING WEST TOWARD 
FREEWAY 



30 




FIG. 17 VIEW OF SITE 2 FROM THE WEST 
LOOKING EAST TOWARD FREEWAY 



31 



are no support structures located in the median to mount the 
CO sensors. The measurement of the horizontal dispersion of 
CO is limited to 400 feet from the shoulder in the easterly 
direction because of a local flood control channel. On the 
western side of the freeway the maximum distance from the 
shoulder is limited to about 60 feet because of the golf course 
facilities. This site can be used only to describe the dis- 
persion of CO for a wind from the westerly direction which 
in this case is the dominating sea breeze. 

San Diego Freeway at National Boulevard 

This site is typical of an at-grade 8 lane freeway, 
including an off ramp, in an urban area. The width of freeway 
from edge of shoulder to edge of shoulder is 130' not including 
the off ramp. The area surrounding both sides of the site 
consists of an apartment complex providing housing for students 
at the University of California at Los Angeles. These are 
two-story structures. This particular site is also located 
near a major freeway interchange of the Santa Monica and San 
Diego Freeways. The site is approximately 1/4 mile south of 
the interchange. This interchange is heavily congested 
during peak morning and evening traffic hours. There are also 
two major surface streets running parallel to the highway 
located about 300 feet from both shoulders of the highway. 
These surface streets are also heavily traveled during the 
morning and evening traffic hours. Also numerous car garages 
for the apartment dwellings are located about 20 feet away 
from the highway on both sides. This site was selected because 
of the CD close proximity of human receptors to the highway 
Capproximately 50 feet minimum distance) and (2) the possible 
interaction of the major freeway interchange and local streets 
with the CO concentrations. 

From the streamline analyses, the prevailing surface winds 
are generally in a crosswind direction with respect to the 
highway alignment. This site is on the Surveillance Project. 
A road sign across the northbound lanes was used to support 
sensors to monitor CO on the median and on the east shoulder 
of the highway. On the west side, a light standard was used 
to support the CO sensor. The measurements of the downwind 
CO dispersion are limited to about 300 feet before the major 
surface streets are reached. Pictures of the site and sur- 
rounding area are shown in Figures 21 through 23, This site 
is not the most ideal site for model validation because of 
the proximity of local background source; however, the 
pollutant measurements at this site can give valuable 
information to assess the impact of highways on air quality 
for. receptors located near major interchanges. 

32 





"£». 




FIG, 13 VIEW OF SITE 3 - SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT WEIGH STATION AS VIEWED FROM 
FREEWAY 



33 




FIG, 19 VIEW OF SITE 3 FROM THE EAST 
LOOKING WEST TOWARDS FREEWAY 



34 




FIG. 20 VIEW OF SITE 3 LOOKING WEST 
AWAY FROM FREEWAY 



35 








FIG. 21 VIEW OF SITE M - SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT NATIONAL BLVD. AS VIEWED FROM 
FREEWAY LOOKING NORTH 



36 




FIG. 22 VIEW OF SITE 4 - EAST SIDE 

LOOKING EAST AWAY FROM FREEWAY 



37 




FIG. 23 VIbW OF SITE 4 - EAST SIDE 
LOOKING WEST ACROSS FREEWAY 



38 



San Diego Freeway at 122nd Street 

This site is typical of an 8 lane freeway on a fill in 
an urban area. The height of the fill is 14 feet above the 
surrounding terrain. Figure 24 shows the geometries of the 
section. The area adjacent to the site provides a flat open 
fetch in both directions. A road sign located over the 
northbound lanes was used to support sensors to monitor CO 
on the east shoulder and the median of the highway. On the 
west side a light standard supported the sensor for the mon- 
itoring of CO. There were no other background interferences 
on CO from other freeways or local surface streets in the 
immediate area. The prevailing surface winds are in a crosswind 
direction with respect to the highway alignment. The site 
is located on the Surveillance Project. 

The major factors in selecting this site were to: (.1) 
evaluate the effect that an elevated source has on the ground 
level concentrations, (2) evaluate the aerodynamic effects 
of the air flow over the fill on the ground level concentra- 
tions (Figure 25) > (.3) compare elevated highways with at-grade 
and depressed sections, and (_4) evaluate a sampling plan for 
a fill section to determine the extension of the microscale 
region. Pictures of the site and surrounding area are shown 
in Figures 26 through 28. 

Table 1 gives a general summary of the sites. 



39 



~ 



'Ss^/s<$?V/S 




149' 



*W A 7Z& 



15" 




yx>y//^xsv 



FIG, 24 GEOMETRICS OF SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT 122nd AVE SITE 
(not to scale) 



40 



(Ik 




WW^ 




-^^S^^^r 



FIG. 25 AERODYNAMIC EDDIES OF AIR FLOW FOR FILL SECTION 



41 







FIG. 26 VIEW OF SITE 5 FROM FREEWAY 

LOOKING NORTH 



42 




FIG. 27 VIEW OF SITE 5 EAST SIDE LOOKING 
WEST TOWARDS FREEWAY 



43 




FIG. 23 VIEW OF SITE 5 WEST SIDE SITE 
LOOKING EAST TOWARDS FREEWAY 



44 



>H 
a 
D 
H 
CO 

o 
z 

H 



o 
raj 

03 

D5 
O 

■P fa 

w z 
►j o 





(A 




3 









v 




c 




* 




H 




rH 




OJ 




U 




in 




•H 




s 




>! 


(TV P 


C 


H 


•H 


r-{ 


u 


•H 


o 


X 


p 


•H 


•H 


Ul 


c 


fl 


o 


OJ 


s 


fa 


MH >1 




O id 


C 


3 


Cn 


0) £ 


■H 


ft en w 


>1-H 


OJ 


H 33 


D 




OJ 


T) 





§ 


C 
OJ 


O 


P 


P 


OJ 


CnMH 


^ 


p 


O 


<D 


(d 


P 


CO 


C 




M 




c 




p 




oj 




•p 




-p 




IT) 




CM 




T3 




C 




•H 




3 




c 









•h 




-p 




A 




u 









J 




ai 




p 




■H 




W 



oj 
c u 

•P C 

•a <-**> 
oj rH o 

P -H OJ 

nj 0J r "> 
u > o 

O P M 
rH 3fa 

OJ CU 
p OJ O 

o) jji-i 



P >i OJ 
OJ P TJ 



. -H.-i . 

o o > 
o 

C <J> u 

id a 

•p cn 

p c to 

P -H P 

to to oj 

oj in aj 

-a o p 

oj p P 

cu cj to 



-a 

OJ 
(0 

w 

OJ 

u 
a 

OJ 
Q 



P 

O <n 
P OJ 
•H -P 
C P 
O -H 
E H 
•H 
P XI 
C id 
oj a, 

rH rd 

■-• cj 

OJ 

U Cn 
X c 

OJ "rH 



OJ 

•a x 

OJ -P 

p e 

rd 

CJ C 
O -H 
H 


to id 

•H ") 

I 

OJ OJ 
P T3 
•H 



to 



C H 

(d id 

I p 

aj c 

c OJ 

o Tl 



a> 
u 

id h 
a) 

W rH 
T> rH 

C id 

•P P 

3 id 

Q. 

Cn >i 
c >i id 
•h ,-i ^ 

l-l rH OJ 

■h id oj 

p u 

OJ MH 

c 

OJ o 
enp 



5 

OJ 

p 



Id to 

3 oj en 

OJ T3 c 

OJ OJ 

p cm 



fa 
OJ 

id 3 

u c 

■rH OJ 

c > 

o <C 

X 

id p c 

p ■>* id 

C H 

id p p 

w id P 



OJ 

c u 
o c 

id 

■OH4J 
0) rH CJ 
P -rH OJ 

id OJ n 
U > O 
O P p 

H 3d, 
CO 

oj a. 

P OJ o 

■h .c o 

w P J 



i 

P >i OJ 
OJ P T) 
> -H -P 

o u > 
o 

C <-8 P 

id Q. 

•h cn 
p c in 

P -rH P 

to to OJ 
oj to oj 

XI O M 

oj u p 
a, u in 



OJ 

to 
to 

OJ 
M 
CU 

<D 
Q 



OJ 
i-H 

Cn 

■DC* 
OJ -H OJ 
P 10 M 

id id 
o C 

O -H rH 
rH Id 

-H 

to id p 

•H 10 C 

1 OJ 
OJ OJ T) 

p -a -h 

i 



i 

u 

O to 

P OJ 
•H -H 
C P 
O rH 

E rH 

•H 

P XI 

c id 
oj a 

rH Id 
rH U 
OJ 

U Di 

X c 

OJ H 



03 



OJ 
U O 

id p 



to 

c 

■H 

s 



M 
O 
C 

cn 
C >i 

•rH i-H 
rH rH >, 
•H Id Id 

id m ? 

> OJ OJ 
oj C OJ 

U OJ Vh 
P* DT4H 





01 


Cn 


p 


<D 


C 


id T) 


•H 




1) 


to 


>ld. 


to 


id 







3 


OJ 


M 


OJ 


3 


U 


OJ 


C 


M 


u 


OJ 


OJ 


ht 


> 


> 




< o 


u 






O £ 


c 


X 


p 


id 


u 


U3 


■H 


id 


-^ 


Vh 


S3 


rH 


4J 



-a 

Q) 
P 

id 
o OJ 

o u 

rH C 

id 

P rH 
O rH 
C -H 

OJ 

to > 

•rH U 

a 

OJ C/3 
P 
•H C 

tn o 



u 

-rH 
"4H 
• MH 
P Id 
O U 
OJ P 
•n 
O - 
P. P 
On OJ 

> 
a oj 
o 3 
o o 

J X 



I 

<y 

oj g p. 
m e o 

id h UH 



id 



id h 

-a 

to OJ 
3 P 



id id 

oj -a 
P 

id u 

•H 

OJ >4H 



P C P 

o to id o 

P OJ tH C 

•rH -H tl 

C P U) 



O -H 

EH 

•rH 0) > 

p x jc id 
c id P 3 
oj a. oj 

rH Id P OJ 
rH O O, P 
OJ OJ MH 

u tn u 
x C X<u 
w -h oj o 



oj 

<a 

id 

p 

en 

i 

p 

< 



i 

u -. e 

OJ T3 OJ 

MH OJ 10 

P P ~ 

oj td 

P o 

c o 



U) Id P MH 

c u id <d 

oj o -rH p 

OHfl+J 



oj en 

<-^ c 

X 'rH 
•rH U 

tfl o 

tO P 
Q) -H 

O c 
U O 
id E 



us 
ai 
P 
id 
t) to 

S-H C 
OJ 

o oj a. 

U P o 
Cn-H 

a; w p 

CJ 



id ^ 

. rH rH 

oj mh id 

u u 

C C 3 

OJ -H P 



I 

oj to 
p to 
id O 
p 
to o 

13 

c id c 
•h o 
5 c -H 
■H P 
tn O 
C >i OJ 
•HHU 
HP-H 
•H Id TD 

id P 
> oj -a 
OJ c c 

P OJ -H 

a< en 3 



>! 




10 


c 


3 





OJ 


■H 


OJ 


p 


u 


OJ 


b 


p 




to 


O 




Cnx: 


OJ 


En 


•p 


•H 


Q 


OJ 




s 


c 




ITJ 


p 


If) 


m 



c 

o a 
o 

T) o 

OJ PI 

p 

<d oj 

u o 

o c 

rH Id 



CO 



rH P 

•H U 

OJ OJ 

> n 

P O 

3 P 



MWft 



tfl I 

OJ 3 

■H O 

P .C T> 



O >, 

o id 

P en 
3 P 
O X 
X 

id E 

O 

oj a. oj --H c o p 

P MH 



OJ T3 



>i-H rH 

id E id 
C id 3 -h P 



P X 



id oj 

CJ p 
OJ MH 

U Cn 
X c c 

W -H O 



OJ 

-a 
id 
p 
en 

i 



p 

OJ I 

oj > id 

CJ OJ P 

C 3 c 

OJ O OJ MH 

p re w o 

OJ OJ 

MH • p to 

p E cu<-> 

OJ OJ OJ OJ 

P H P > 

CX OJ 

•H O tfl rH 

P -H 

t) a o 

§0j CJ 

id p 

O -H MH 

P OJ to o 
CnX 

^ tfl OJ 
CJ >vH > 

id id X -p 

m E p p 



OJ 

P o 
id p 

W rH 

-a id 

c E 

•h p 

3 O 

c 
Cn 
C Si 



» N 

P -H 
OJ P 

> o 

oj a 



c P 

o OJ 

■P OJ 

P MH 



rH rH >, 

-p <d id 

id P 3 

> oj oj 

oj c oj 

p OJ p 



CH CnMH 



>i • 

id -a 
3 > 

OJ rH 

oj m 
p 

fa rH 

id 

2. c 
Cn o 

OJ -H 
•H p 

a m 

2 



cn id 



C 

o a 
o 

TI O 

OJ PI 
P 

id aj 
u u 
o c 

r-t Id 
(0 rH p 

■P -H CJ 
OJ OJ 
OJ > -n 
P P O 
•H 3 p 
CO W PL, 



C P 

O H 

E rH 



>|rH 

id id 



p x p n 

C Id MH -H 

oj a p 

rH HJ OJ O 

HU££ 
OJ P 

cj cn -a 

x c c c 

WHO B 







•H 








Cn 








1 

P 




p 




OJ T> 


Id 1 rH 




MH 


OJ 


OJ P OJ 




P 


p id 


C OJ rH 




a> 


id oj 


P i-H 




p 


CJ P 


T) C id 




c 


o id 


OJ -H P 




•H 


r-t 


p id 






c 


id >. a 




-a 


tn oj 


u m 




§ 


•p a 


3-0 







r-i JC C 







OJ 


Cn id 




u 


p p 


P -p 




Cn 


■rH ITJ 


o X tn 


tn 


X 


CO rH 


■P OJ 


pi 


CJ 


MH 


a P Cn 


OJ 


Id 


• 


OJ o c 


OJ 


X 


oj id 


u T-> id 


p 




CJ 


oj id x 


p 


o 


c c 


P E CJ 


tfl 


2 

OJ 


OJ -P 






p 









id 


p 






to 


rH 






-a 


id 






a 


E 






•H 


p 






3 


o 
c 






Cn 








C 


>1 






•H 


rH 






r-i 


■H >, 






•H 


id id 






id 


P 3 






> 


OJ OJ 






OJ 


C OJ 






p 


OJ P 






cu 


CnMn 



>1 

id 
3 P 

oj oj 

OJ 0) 

p p 
fa p 
w 
o 

Cn>0 
OJ c 

•H <N 
Q IN 



45 



DATA COLLECTION SCHEME 

In all experimental designs, it is necessary to know the 
capabilities and limitations of the instrumentation used to 
monitor the variables under study, It is the purpose of this 
section to discuss the type of sampling apparatus used to 
monitor the CO concentrations, meteorological, and traffic 
parameters. The exact sampling procedures will also be 
discussed. 

Carbon Monoxide Bag Sampling 

For this preliminary study, the bag sampling technique 
was employed. This is one of the methods that has been 
used by the California Air Resources Board and the California 
State Department of Eealth. For this technique, the air from 
the desired sampling location is pumped through tubing to a 
flexible bag for collection. Variable flow pumps (.2 liter 
per minute maximum! manufactured by Atmospheric Sciences, 
Incorporated, draw air samples through 3/8" teflon and tygon 
tubing into 12" x 18" aluminized polyester bags. These bags 
have about a 10 liter capacity. These bags were made by the 
California Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory and the 
Transportation Laboratory, The pumps were powered by a 6 volt 
dry cell battery that can be purchased at most hardware stores. 
To determine the vertical dispersion of CO, lightweight aluminum 
poles were used. These poles can telescope up to about 30 
feet above the ground surface and provide a portable, easy 
to raise framework for monitoring CO at moderate elevations. 
Guy wires must be used to support these poles in their fully 
extended position. The exposure of each probe and sampling 
time to fill a bag sample will be discussed in the next 
sections. Figures 29 and 30 show a typical sampling setup 
for on and off freeway locations, respectively. 

A Beckman 315BL nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer 
located in a construction trailer adjacent to the monitoring 
sites was used to analyze the CO bag samples. The analyzer 
has two ranges, 0-100 ppm and 0-300 ppm. The accuracy of the 
analyzer is + 1% of full range. The analyzer uses a narrow 
band pass filter to screen out interferences from carbon 
dioxide and water vapor. Sample flow rates were manually 
adjusted by a regulator valve to one liter per minute as 
measured with a rotameter. The sample cell operates at 
atmospheric conditions. Bag samples are directed into the 
NDIR analyzers at a constant flow, by manually squeezing the 
bags. The analyzer was calibrated once a day with a zero 
and 90 ppm span gas. A separate and independent calibration 

k6 




FIG 29 SETUP BELOW RO.C. STRUCTURE FOR DEPRESSED FREEWAY SECTION 



47 





s 


- 1 r 

\ 


\ 






a. 



CO 



CO 

o 

Cl. 

>■ 



li_ 
I 



o 

Q. 

>- 



o 
ro 

CD 



of the CO analyzer was also made by the California Air Resources 
Board. The results of their calibration were well within 
the allowable experimental error C5.lt The output from the 
analyzer was recorded on a strip chart, Power for the 
analyzer was obtained from a hookup to a nearby power pole. 
Figures 31 and 32 are pictures of the construction trailer 
and CO analyzer. 

Meteorological Data 

Surface wind speeds, directions, and temperatures were monitored 
using a MR I Model 1071 Mechanical Weather Station (MWS). 
The outputs are on pressure sensitive chart paper. A battery 
wound drive powers the chart paper. The chart was changed 
once a month. The starting threshold speed and direction are 
0.50 mph and 0.75 mph, respectively. The overall accuracy 
for wind speed is + 2% of full scale while the overall direction 
accuracy is + 1% of full range. The relative accuracy of the 
temperature sensor is + 3°F. Figure 33 is a picture of the 
MRI mechanical weather station at Site 1. Figure 3^ is a close 
up view of the MWS and Figure 35 is a typical example of 
the output from the strip chart recorder. 

To measure the localized wind flow fields within adjacent 
streets at each site, a Belfort Hand Held wind system was used 
intermittently. This wind system measures wind speed and 
direction by means of a rotor and a vane. The wind speed 
can be read on two ranges CO to 15 knots and to 60 knots). 
The wind direction ranges from 0° to 360°. The overall 
accuracy of the wind speed and direction is + 3% and + 2%, 
respectively. The starting speed is 1.0 knot. Figure 36 is 
a picture of this wind system. 

Traffic Data 

All of the traffic data for the experimental sites (except 
the San Diego Freeway site at the weigh station) were obtained 
from the computerized Surveillance Project. The traffic data 
included a cumulative vehicle count at 5 minute intervals 
along with estimated traffic speeds. This information was 
obtained from traffic monitoring pads located at one half mile 
along the loop. Studies made by the California Department 
of Transportation, District 07, Freeway Operations Section, 
indicated the accuracy of the traffic data was within + 
10$. Generally the traffic volumes were averaged over a 30 
minute or 1 hour averaging time. 



49 




FIG. 31 CONSTRUCTION TRAILER AT SITE 1 
HOUSING CO ANALYZER 



50 




FIG, 32 CO ANALYZER IN CONSTRUCTION 

TRAILER 



51 




FIG, 55 MECHANICAL WEATHER STATION 

AT SITE 1 



52 




FIG. 34 CLOSE UP VIEW OF MECHANICAL 
WEATHER STATION. (THIS SET- 
UP NOT USED FOR DATA COLLECTION) 



53 




FIG 35 TYPICAL OUTPUT FROM MECHANICAL WEATHER STATION 



54 




FIG. 36 HAND HELD WIND SYSTEM 



55 



The traffic data for the site on the San Diego Freeway 
at the weigh, station were obtained from yearly traffic census 
pads located approximately one^quarter of a mile from the 
site. The District OJ Traffic Department indicated that 
the traffic volumes were within + 10$. Speed estimates 
Cmph) were obtained by "floating 17 " a car in the traffic stream 
on the freeway in both directions t This was done periodically 
during peak and off-peak traffic hours. 



5.6 



DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT 

As mentioned previously, one of the major objectives of 
this preliminary study was to characterize the dispersion of 
CO from a highway line source. In order to study the dispersion 
of CO it is necessary to determine the temporal and spatial 
distribution of the pollutant. This means that all sampling 
points at each site must be sampled at the same time. To meet 
all of the objectives of this study, the following items had 
to be considered: 

1) Determination of the averaging time for CO bag 
sampling that would be most practical for field 
studies. 

2) Standardized exposure of the meteorological 
instrumentation and air probes for all sites. 

3l A sampling program which would be associated 
with changes in traffic volumes Con and off- 
peak hours) and meteorological conditions. 

4). A sampling scheme to encompass 

(a) in-section study 

Cb) Downwind dispersion study 

CcX vertical dispersion study 

(.d) microscale region for ambient levels. 

5) Practicality in terms of manpower and equipment. 

Carbon Monoxide Averaging Time 

Determination of a minimum averaging time to collect an 
air sample which would adequately represent a continuous one- 
hour sample was the first step in the study. It was necessary 
to determine whether (1) a bag sample of 5 minutes averaging 
time (.12 samples average to obtain 1 hour average), (2) a 30 
minute averaging time (.2 samples averaged to obtain 1 hour 
average) or 03) a one-hour integrated sample (1 hour to fill 
an air sample bag) was most representative of a continuous 
one-hour air analysis. The averaging time selected should 
be as practical as possible because of equipment and manpower 
limitations. It must also be statistically representative 
of the continuous one-hour analysis. A complete discussion 
of the averaging time study is found in the section on Data 
Analyses . 



51 



Exposure of Instrumentation 

Standardization for instrument exposure jL ; s extremely 
important when statistically- comparing the CO concentrations 
of one site to another. The vertical extent of CO measurements 
downwind from the highway in this study was limited to about 
30 feet above the ground surface. This resulted from the 
physical height limitation of the sampling mast, which is 
about 30 feet. Standard exposure of probes for measurements 
of CO downwind of all sites were selected to be at heights 
of 5s 17s and 29 feet above the ground surface. The five-foot 
level would be representative of the air that receptors receive 
at ground level. The 17- and 29-foot levels are representative 
of the air that high level receptors (.apartments buildings, 
etc.) would receive. 

To examine the CO concentrations to which drivers are 
subjected, standard measurements of CO were made at both 
shoulders and the median Cwhere possible) of the freeway 
section. These standard heights were selected at 4, 8, 12, 
16, and 20 feet above the pavement. Also measurements at 36* 
44, 52, and 60 feet above the pavement on the median were 
made where possible. Figures 37 through 44 show a typical 
sampling scheme. Note that bag samples are taken on both 
sides of the freeway site. This allows an ambient CO level 
to be determined depending on the wind direction. 

Proper exposure of meteorological sensors is critical 
in built up and urban areas. Large roughness characteristics 
in these areas create dramatic wind shears along with localized 
aerodynamic effects. Obstructions (houses, trees, etc.) near 
the sensor can completely disturb the wind flow field. by 
generating local aerodynamic eddies. In order to minimize 
these effects and provide comparative measurement of wind 
speeds and directions at all sites, a standard height of 10 
meters or its equivalent (_3) was followed as close as possible. 
This standard height of 10 meters was applied to the exposure 
of the MRI Mechanical Weather Stations. Localized wind flow 
fields were measured with hand held wind systems held above 
and away from one's body to minimize the air flow disturbance. 

Design of Sampling Program Associated with Changes 
In Traffic and Meteorological Conditions 

Variation in pollutant source strength and meteorology 
are important considerations when field data are collected 
and used for any type of model validation or dispersion study. 
Traffic volumes and average route speed are a direct measure 

58 



H* 



CO h- 

<M — 

I I 



^JJ 



ro>y 



10 



G5) 



rioi 



CM tJ- 






© © © 



© © © 



© © © 




© © ® 

'8 S! > 




>2 = H 




CVJ «- 



59 



ce 

UJ 
CD 

2 

:=> 
z 

UJ 

CD 
O 

ce 
a. 

CO 

UJ 

o 

z 

UJ 







>- 



on 



CJ 



>- 



CO 

(=1 



co - ^ 



- I— 



CO O 

O 

•— . -y 



o 



CQ 

O H- 

on <c 






CD 



O 



m 



! 



gi- 



- j . 

o <vi <r 

(D lO t 



W 



rO 




UJ 
00 

3 

z 

UJ 
03 
O 
£E 
O. 

in 

UJ 
O 
UJ 



© 






>- 



on \— 
u_ oo 

<_> CD 



o 


CD 




s^* 


LU 


UJ 




OO 


_.J 


1— 


1 


< 

O 


3»" 


•— i 


<z 




<n 


OO 


- 


/o 



oo 



o 



<c > 

CD <C 
CD 



PQ 

O t— 



OO 



CJD 



0> 

® 






to 

fib 



© © ® 



(*) C$) 



w 



® 



& 



© ®® © 



O "<\J *}" 
(0 if) T 



10 



© 



0©© 




© 



©@© 



/ 



<D CM CO <t 




cvj — 



,2Z = H 



or 

CD 

Z 

UJ 
CD 
O 

oe 
o. 

to 
ui 

i- 
o 

2 
UJ 







>- 



QC 



eel 
O 
PQ 






o 



OQ 
CD 

ac 



cn 
ho 



e? 



>- 
n 



CO 









o 



lO 



r ro^ 



QJ (a 



"o 

CD 



C\J 

m 



w 






CO 

ro 




©©©©©/ — l 



O CO CM CD <fr 
CM «- — 







© 



-i ^ 




r 



22 = H 



r 



«r 

UJ 

QD 

Z 

UJ 
03 
O 

or 
a 

to 

UJ 

o 

2 
UJ 







>- 
<£ 

^ >- 

UJ Q 

LU ZD 

OC I — 

Ll_ OO 



en 


ZP* 




o 


CD 




§ 




UJ 


«=c 


C_D 


_J 


=c 


UJ 


«<£ 




CO 


o 


^ 


1 


to 


CO 


^*~ 




s^ 


1— 1 


o 


o 




*~ 


»— -4 


UJ 




h- 


> 


h- 


<c 


<c 


o 


c_> 




:<£ 


O 


3: 





uj -=r 

PQ H 
CD 

OH \— 

Q_ <£ 



CD 



CJD 

t— « 

Li- 



te 



r«n 



to 

d 
o 

D 
< 



CD 



I 



m 



O 
m 



o 
10 



(D © © 



© © ®E 



.1 j 

C\J ,- 



m 



I* 



© © ©* 
© © © 



o 



00 

to 



cc 

UJ 
CD 

Z 

UJ 
CD 
O 

cc 
a 

CO 
UJ 

\- 
o 

2 
UJ 









>- 




>- 


« 




•cC 


ZD 




^ 


h- 




UJ 


CO 




LU 






LL_ 


a 

z 




CO 
CD 
LU 


| 


uJ 


Q 


CD 


_l 


Q 


-rf 


Zg* 




O 


<C 




C/> 


CO 


% 






"Z^ 


o 


CO 


CD 


H 


o 




1— 


•— 1 


1 — 


o 




CO 


Z 


CD 


ZH 


■N-' 


CD 


CD 




1 


LU 




LU 






PQ 






O 


1 — 




Od 


<C 




D_ 







o 

m 



CD 



I 



63 



r«^ 



i 



r*n 



®<D©E 



!l 



;^ 



l 



00 ©t 

"CM "CO V 



"8 



-m* 



. 4 

o 

CVJ 



O 
JO 



<r 
iii 
oo 

D 
Z 

UJ 
CO 
O 

or 

tx 

co 

Ul 

h- 
o 

z 

Ul 









q 






=D 




>- 


h- 




<c 


OO 




~^ 






LU 






LU 






Q£ 






LL_ 


Q 




CD 


»— « 




CD 


_s; 




UJ 


zm 






~^g* 




S 


CD 


LU 
1 


2= 




< 


oo 




CO 


«* 


Q 


o 


*s^ 


> 


CD 


1 




1 


O 


cd 


<c 


N_y 


o 


zr 




i 


CD 




LU 


1— 




PQ 


<C 




CD 


^^ 




Cd 






Q_ 


1— 




CM 






-=r 







CD 



© 






64 



r ai\ 



3DN3J M/a(g 
®®®®©t 



£ 

% 



©©©©©! 

"O "e> "cvj ~co V 

CM — — 
33N3J M/8© 






lO 



© 



tr 

UJ 
CD 

D 
2 

UJ 
CO 

o 
a 

V) 



o 

2 
UJ 

o 





^ S 



UJ CO 
CXI 

LL_ 2= 
O 

CD —. 

CD h— 

UJ CD 

•—■ |_U 

Q CO 
I 

CO 

z: > 

CD —I 

•— PQ 
h— 

<C -J 

cd <c 

cd sr 



PQ 
CD 

Q_ 






CD 



UJ 

< 
o 
c/> 

o 

I- 



o 

o 



1 



6£ 



<^J 






>- 






<x. 






3= 






UJ 


>- 




UJ 


o 




on 


=D 


<r 


u_ 


I— 


UJ 




oo 


CD 


CD 




2 

3 


CJD 
UJ 


O^ 


Z 


*— -* 


2T -» 




Q 


—. < 


UJ 
CO 

o 


<c 


=1° 


<r 


C/0 


go 


Q. 


* 


(/) 


oo 


H 


UJ 


CD 


^ I— 


o 


h- 


<c o 


z 


<c 


~Z 


UJ 


CD 


Q 3 


o 


CD 


z 




1 


CNJ 


1 

© 


UJ 


CSJ 

l—J 




CD 


1— 




on 


«=t: 




Q_ 






c3- 






-=r 





(-D 



•o £6 



-"-© © — ©©©©© 
I J 



©©©©© 
J J J I 

O (Q CVJ CD "Vj- 




cr 

UJ 
CD 



LJ 
CO 
O 
OC 
CL 

</> 

UJ 

H 

o 

UJ 

o 



© 



5 



CD 
CD 



CO 



Q I— 

CD 

LU 

CO 

I 



CO 



CO 
CD 



CD 

CD 



PQ 
CD 
OH 
Q_ 



LA 

cr 



CD 



UJ 

> 

Q 

Z 

CNJ 

CN! 



< 
O 

CO 

o 



of source strength-, or the amount of CO generated. It is 
generally accepted that the. higher the ayerage route speed, 
the lower the emissions of CO Q>)._. The lower the average route 
speed, the higher the CO emissions-. Traffic volume can change 
significantly from peak to off-peak, hours. It is a necessity 
to design and schedule a sampling program to cover peak and 
off-peak periods to be able to characterize the source strength 
and dispersion. 

Meteorology is another important parameter to consider 
when designing any air quality study. Meteorology determines 
the extent to which the pollutants generated on highways will 
be transported and dispersed. A stable surface atmospheric 
condition can restrict the dispersion of pollutants from line 
sources causing high ground level concentrations. Unstable 
surface atmospheric conditions enhance the dispersion of 
pollutants from line sources and tend to minimize ground level 
concentrations. Generally a stable surface atmospheric con- 
dition occurs with light winds and clear skies and is associated 
with a nighttime or late evening or early morning condition. 
Peak morning traffic hours occasionally occur with stable 
atmospheric conditions in the Los Angeles Basin. The unstable 
conditions generally occur In the daytime associated with 
clear skies and light winds. This is a typical condition within 
the Los Angeles Basin during late morning and early afternoon. 
The wind speed also influences ground level pollutant concen- 
trations. Generally the higher the wind speed, the lower 
the ground level concentrations. Dominating sea breezes 
generally occur in the Los Angeles Basin beginning in early 
and mid-afternoon periods. To completely characterize the 
transport and dispersion of CO, the sampling program must 
include different types of meteorological conditions. 

Sampling Scheme For the Evaluation of CO 

A sampling plan to define the microscale region and also 
to encompass the temporal and spatial variations of CO for 
(1) in-section dispersion, (2) downwind dispersion, and (3) 
vertical dispersion was designed on the availability of manpower 
and equipment. Based on these limitations the sampling scheme 
used is shown in Figures 37 through 45. 

Temporal and Spatial Distributions of CO 

For any field study of dispersion, the measurements of 
pollutant concentrations must be made simultaneously at 
each sampling point to be comparable. Measurements made at 
one point for a given duration of time followed by a move 

6T8 



to another point for another measurement does not giye the 
temporal and spatial distributions of pollutants t The data 
measured under these conditions are not simultaneous and contain 
large yariations* in meteorologi-cal parameters from point to 
point. Also, the traffic conditions, which are a function 
of time, can significantly- affect pollutant concentrations. 
All measurements- of CO in this study were made simultaneously 
to determine and characterize the temporal and spatial distri- 
bution of CO at each site. 



6"9 



SYSTEM SETUP AND -RELIABIL ITY 

Prior to the beginning of monitoring operations, numerous 
tests were run to determine the accuracy of the hag sampling 
techniques^ and equipment used in the preliminary study. The 
following is a discussion of each, test made. 

Variability of CO Concentration Kith Location 

In this study, all of the monitoring equipment was stored 
overnight at or near each site in a trailer. For an experi- 
mental design requiring more than one day of sampling, the 
equipment must be relocated in the same position. Therefore, 
the degree of precision required in setting up each day was 
important. This was determined by comparing readings from 
several bags sampled at the same location. Since variations 
of carbon monoxide are larger near the source of emissions, 
this test Cone day) was conducted adjacent to the top of the 
cut on the 4th Avenue site on the Santa Monica Freeway. The 
test consisted of four probes separated at horizontal distances 
up to 8 feet. Each air sample was taken 5 feet above the 
ground surface. A 5 minute bag sampling time was used. Figure 
46 shows a layout of the test and the data. The range of the 
standard deviation was 0.045 as indicated. 

The measured CO concentrations showed the maximum differ- 
ence in site concentration to be 1 ppm. Most of the differences 
were 0.5 ppm or less. This is well within the accuracy of 
the operator and instrumentation to measure CO concentrations. 
For this reason, and the small number of tests, no statistical 
analysis of the variability was made. 

The measurements for this test were made on only one 
day. Other microraeteorological conditions of surface 
stability may possibly cause a greater variance depending 
on the amount of atmospheric turbulence to diffuse the 
pollutant plume. Since the measurements were made close to 
the source, where a large variability would be expected, it 
is reasonable to assume that under other atmospheric conditions 
the* variance will be similar. 

Effects of Bag Sampling Time on CO Concentrations 

Bag sampling averaging time was an important consideration 
in this preliminary study because of the necessity of using 
a scheme which would conserve manpower and equipment. Com- 
parative tests were made in which air was sampled simultaneously 
with air bags while continuous monitoring was done by the 

70 



> 



O'Od 3AV HI i? 



\:g- 



< 



< 
h- 

-z. 
< 

CO 



I :Q"l 




c_j 

cd 












CO 


CO 








CO 


CM 




- 


LO LO LO LO 


CO 


00 




00 


• 


. 


. 


CD 


+ 


LOCOOCOOOLOCOCOLO*3-^-LO 


CO 


1 — 


S 





1 — 


II 


+1 


i — i 






00 


II 


Q 






IX 


b ffi 


< 








LlJ 
DC 
























r-^ 


CM 


LU 






1 — 


co 


_1 


- 


LO LO LO LO 


«3- 


00 


<=c 


*d- 


. 


• 


. 


C_J 


+ 


LOCOOOOCT»COCOrv.LO , =d- , 5d-LO 


<JD 


1 — 


CO 


CD 


•— 


II 


+1 

1 1 


o 






IX 




2: 








t? 


_1 






LO 





Q_ 






r-« 


CO 


S 


- 


LO LO LO 


ro 


00 


<c 


CM 


... 


. 


. 


CO 


+ 


Lor*«.ococT>cocot^LO''stf-<s)- , vj- 


CO 


r— ~ 




O 


1 — 


II 


+1 


LU 






0J 


II 


1— 






IX 


b N 


ID 








<^. 










1— 1 






00 


LO 


2! 






LO 


1 — 




- 


LO LO LO 


■vf 


CO 


LO 


O 


. . 


• 


. 




+ 


LOr~>-OOOCT>UD>X)r^LO>^-^)-LO 


CO 


1 — 




O 




IX° 


+1 
II 

b° 


Q 
LU 








CO LU 


LOOLOOLOOLOOLOOLOO 






O- 51 


Oi — ■ — CMCMCOCO-sd-^J-LOLOCO 






■St t-H 
—1 1— 














LU 









CM 



CM 
CO 



■St 



LO 

o 
o 

I 

LO 

o 

CT> 
O 



o o 
o o_ 







O DC 

1 — 1 LU 

h- u_ 

<t LU 

CC DC 



LU O 
CJ> DC 



O 
O 



CM 



CM 



o 
o 



o 

o_ 



C_) 



o 

I — I 

<t 

1—1 

> 

LU 
Q 

Q 
DC 

< 
Q 
■Zl 
■st 
\— 
CO 

II 

I °° 

lo 



DC 



O 
DC 



LU 
CO 



C_J 

o 
co 

CD 



CD 

>- 






t-O 



71 



TABLE 2 



RELATIONSHIPS OF VARIOUS AVERAGING TIMES 
TO HOURLY AVERAGES 











Bag 


Sampling Averaging 


Time 


Run No. 


Date 


Time 


5 Mir 


L. 


30 Min. 


1 Hour 


1 Hour 
Integrated 


1 


3/20/72 


0835-0935 


19.2 




18.3 


17.5 


18.0 


2 


3/20/72 


1025-1125 


11.6 




11.8 


12.0 


12.5 


3 


3/20/72 


1240-1340 


9.3 




9.3 


10.0 


9.0 


4 


3/21/72 


0730-0830 


26.0 




26.0 


26.0 


26.0 



All values are in ppm. 






72. 



NDIR analyzer at the same location. The probes were located 
within the cut section on the 4th. Avenue pedestrian Oyercrossing 
on the! Santa : tyonlca freeway 3 atxout 15 feet from the edge of 
th-e pavement. The proh.es were located near the vehicular 
emi.S'Sion source to obtain maximum variability of CO concentration, 
Ih these tests, frag samples of different averaging times 
C5 minutes to one hour I were analyzed and compared to the 
integrated hourly average of the continuously recorded trace 
from tile NDXR analyzer. The integrated one hour average from 
the NDIR analyzer was determined using a planimeter. Table 
2 shows the data measured and the average values. A statistical 
test was made to determine if there was a significant difference 
in the averaging times to measure the one hour CO concentrations. 
The nonparametric Friedman Two Way Analysis of Variance test 
was used. This test was used because of the small sample 
size and lack of information about the distribution of the 
data. The results of this test at the 5% level of signifi- 
cance indicate that there is no significant difference in CO 
concentrations for the various averaging times. It was 
concluded that the bag sampling provides accuracy and repeat- 
ability within 1 ppm of reading obtained by direct continuous 
NDIR analyses for all the averaging times examined. 

Evaluation of Bag Materials in Bag Sampling 

During the course of this study on the dispersion of carbon 
monoxide from highways , various sampling bag materials were 
tested: aluminized polyester (Scotchpak), clear Mylar, and 
opaque Mylar. Prior to the use of any bags in the research, 
exhaustive tests were run to establish the repeatability and 
validity of CO data taken using the bags. A significant 
anomaly was discovered using Mylar bags purchased from Specialty 
Converting Incorporated, South El Monte, California. These 
bags were clear Mylar, 5 mil., 16" x 16" in size, and were 
equipped with Halkey-Robert ' s valves. The inconsistency with 
the Mylar bags was initially noticed when performing tests 
comparing these bags with previously tested aluminized 
Scotchpak (3M Company) bags received from the California Air 
and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory (AIHL) in Berkeley. These 
comparison tests resulted in the Mylar bags yielding consist- 
ently higher (sometimes more than double) readings than 
the Scotchpak bags when collecting the same ambient sample. 
Subsequent to this discovery, five of the Mylar bags were 
tested under different environmental conditions with varying 
CO concentrations. The procedure and results of these 
tests which were conducted on March 28, 29, and 30, 1972, 
follow: 



73 



Test No. 1 

A clear Mylar bag was flushed thoroughly with zero gas 
(00=0 ppm a hydrocarbon - free air) and then filled with zero 
gas. It was analyzed and then exposed to direct sunlight. 
During exposure the bag was analyzed hourly using a Beckraan 
Model 315 BL NDIR. Table 3 shows the results. 

Table 3 Mylar Bags Pilled With Zero Gas 

Time % Full Scale* 

(Filled and analyzed) 



10:30 





11:30 


3 


12:30 


9.5 


13:30 


19 


14:30 


36 


15:30 


70+ (bag exhausted 




with meter 




still deflect 




ing upwards) 



*NDIR meter deflection is percent full scale and only slightly 
higher than concentration in ppm for the 0-100 ppm range 
used Ce.g.j 36 percent full scale = 32 ppm) 

Test No. 2 

A clear Mylar bag was flushed and then filled with 
90 ppm CO span gas (92.8 meter deflection). The bag was then 
analyzed, placed in sunlight as before, and analyzed hourly. 
The results are shown in Table 4. 

Table 4 Mylar Bags Filled With 90 ppm CO 

Time % Full Scale 



(.Filled and analyzed) 10:45 

11:45 



92.8 
95.5 



- Misplaced in shade from 1145 to 1310 - 

14:10 100+ (exceed limit 

of scale 
with this 
range) 



74 



Test No. 3 

A clear Mylar bag was filled with a mix of CO span gas 
and analyzed to be 23.5 percent full scale. It was then 
subjected to the same conditions as previous tests (direct 
sunlight) and analyzed hourly. Table 5 shows the results. 

Table 5 Mylar Bags Fill With 23 ppm CO 

Time % Full Scale 

(Filled and analyzed) 



11:15 


23.5 


12:15 


26.5 


13:15 


32.0 


14:15 


43.5 


15:15 


64.0 



Test No. 4 

A clear Mylar bag was flushed and filled with zero 
gas and placed inside the monitoring trailer at 70°F where 
it was analyzed hourly. The results are shown in Table 6. 

Table 6 Mylar Bags Filled With Zero Air at 70°F 

Time % Full Scale 

(Filled and analyzed) 



12:00 





13:00 


0.8 


14:00 


1.0 


15:00 


2.0 



Test No. 5 

A clear Mylar bag was flushed and filled with zero 
gas and then placed out of the sun in a closed automobile. 
It was analyzed and the temperature recorded at each hour. 
Table 7 shows the results. 

Table 7 Mylar Bags Filled With Zero Air Exposed 
to Environmental Conditions 



Time % Full Scale Temperature 



(.Filled and analyzed) 



12:30 





Not available 


13:30 


1 


94°F 


14:30 


1.5 


94°F 


15:30 


2.0 


88°F 



75 



It was apparent after these tests that Mylar, when exposed 
to the direct sunlight, reacts with ambient air to produce 
a substance which the NDIR detected as CO. This may be caused 
by: (.1) mixture of gases in the bag undergoing photochemical 
changes, (.2). the ultraviolet (uv) wave lengths in solar 
radiation may cause out-gassing of plasticizers or other 
compounds from the bag wall, and (3) combination of both of 
the above. The product of the chemical reactions discussed 
above is either CO or a compound which the NDIR identifies 
as CO. No studies were made to investigate the effects of 
aging the bags before sampling. 

The bags which were held out of the sun but at different 
temperatures (.Tests Nos. 4 and 5) yielded only a slight 
increase in recorded CO, a difference that could possibly 
be attributed to instrument repeatability, human error, or 
even reflected sunlight. An attempt was therefore made to 
protect the Mylar bags from the sunlight by spraying the 
external surface with aluminum paint to make the bag opaque. 
Tests were then run comparing three bag types: Scotchpak, 
clear Mylar, and opaque Mylar. These bags were filled with 
zero gas and placed in the sunlight for hourly analyses. Table 
8 shows the results where Bag No. 1 - Scotchpak, Bag No. 2 
- clear Mylar, and Bag No. 3 - aluminum sprayed Mylar. 







r 


rable 8 


Comparison 

Mylar Bags 


of Scotchpak Bags 
and Opaque Mylar 


, CI 
Bags 


ear 






Te 


3t 


No. 6A 






% Full Scale 








Time 


Bag 


No. 1 




Bag No. 2 




Bag 


No. 3 


0830 
0930 
1030 
1130 


















4.5 

6.0 

11.5 








0.5 


0.5 




Te 


3t 


No. 6B 


(Same 


test < 


as 6A) 

% Full Scale 








Time 


Bag No. 1 




Bag No. 2 




Bag 


No. 3 


0630 
0730 
0830 
0930 
1030 



















1 
1 
2 














The above test results indicate that clear Mylar is 
undesirable for use in ambient air bag sampling for NDIR 
analysis. Substantial test data indicate that sunlight on 
these bags produces high NDIR readings for carbon monoxide. 
Because of these results Scotchpak bags were used exclusively 
for the bag sampling of carbon monoxide. 

Carbon Monoxide Decay With Time 

All CO air samples were collected using bags. Studies 
made by the California Air Resources Board and the California 
Department of Health indicate that CO is relatively inert . 
This implies that CO concentrations would not decay with 
time when using the bag sampling techniques. To verify this 
assumption, studies were made by the Transportation Laboratory 
to simulate bag sampling in typical field temperature and 
humidity conditions. For this test 14 air sample bags were 
filled in the laboratory with a span gas (4l ppm) which was 
certified by the California Air Resources Board. Seven of 
these bags were placed in a large cardboard box exposed 
outside in the sunlight. This was to simulate field environ- 
mental conditions. The diurnal change in surface temperature 
ranged from a low of 60°F to a high of 100°F. The other 
seven were placed in a large cardboard box and were placed 
inside of the laboratory under controlled environmental con- 
ditions of about 75°F. All bag samples for the inside and 
outside environmental conditions were analyzed 1, 3> 17 s 46, 
70 and 95 hours after filling. All of the air samples were 
analyzed by a Beckman 315 BL nondispersive infrared (NDIR) 
analyzer located in the Transportation Laboratory. Table 
9 is a summary of the results. 

Table 9 

Summary of "Variations in NDIR Response When Using Scotchpak Bags 



Date 


Time 


Reading 
Outside 


PPM 
Inside 


Decay 
Time Hrs . 


Remarks 


8-28-72 


1100 
1200 


41 
41 


41 
41 


1 


Bags 
filled 


8-28-72 


1400 


40 


40 


3 




8-29-72 


0900 


41 


41 


17 




8-30-72 


0900 


40 


40 


46 




8-31-72 


0900 


40 


41 


70 




9-1-72 


1030 


41 


40 


95.5 





77 



The difference between samples exposed to the two envi- 
ronments is 1 ppm which is well within the accuracy of the 
equipment. This result indicates that there is no decay in 
CO concentration when the sample is held in a bag made of 
approved material,, such as Scotchpak. 

Effects of Types of Tubing on 
Carbon Monoxide Concentrations 

During this preliminary study, all air samples were 
collected using Scotchpak air sample bags and 3/8" I.D. teflon 
tubing. Extensive use was made of teflon tubing because of 
its inert characteristics with respect to automobile exhaust 
pollutants; that is, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides 
of nitrogen, and secondary pollutants such as ozone. 

Field experience indicated one problem with teflon 
tubing in that great care must be taken to not kink the tubing 
when making small radius bends. It was apparent that a more 
flexible tubing material would be desirable provided it was 
inert to CO. The California Air Resources Board, State 
Department of Health, and various manufacturers of air 
monitoring instrumentation suggested that tygon tubing 
would be adequate to satisfy our needs in terms of flexibility 
and inertness. In addition, the cost of tygon was about one 
half that of teflon making it desirable from an economic 
standpoint . 

To minimize costs and to provide for ease of field 
installation, it was decided to test four different types 
of tubing material for reaction with CO: teflon, tygon, green 
polyvinylchloride, and white polyvinylchloride . The lengths 
of tubing were about 50 feet. The primary purpose for testing 
the polyvinylchloride tubing was not because of its additional 
flexibility compared to teflon, but its minimal cost. Therefore, 
the primary objective of this experiment was to (1) simulate 
field sampling conditions, and (2) determine if the tygon and 
polyvinylchloride tubing would provide valid samples as compared 
to teflon. To simulate field conditions the tubing lines 
were placed on a grass and concrete surface. A known span 
gas of 41 ppm was run through each type of tubing and collected 
in a Scotchpak bag at the end of each line. Table 10 is 
a summary of these results. 

In Table 10 the column heading "previous total exposure 
time", refers to the length of time the tubing was exposed 
to direct sunlight prior to testing. 

J8 



sz o 

H Z 
Hi H 

D 

o <; 

Hi 

HI fa 

S H 

2 Q 
W 2 

fa Z 

o o 

co. 
En 
U 

w 

fa 
fa 
fa 



en 

n 

3 

en o 

c x 

■H 
rH C 

ft o 

(0 +J 

10 rd 

M 

3 
Q 



C 
O 
•H 

0) (0 

M U 

3 4J 

10 C 

(0 Q) 

<D O 

S C 

o 

u 



Ifl CD 

■p e 

O -H 

E-i Eh 

m cu 

3 M 

O 3 

•H UJ 

> O 

CU ft 

U X 

fa W 



•o fa 

0) 
(0 o 

o m 

ftCTN 

x 

a> +1 

Cn c 
C 3 
•H U) 

3p 

-P o 
XI 
3 

a) c 



> 
o 

-Q 
Ifl 



a) 

> 

o 
a 

(0 

to 
ffl 

£ 
10 



+ 
O (N iH O 
^* T IT) O 



+ 
W rH O O 



*T *3* ^3* O 



o o o o 





-P 




■H 




3 




-a 


4-1 


c 


3 





ft o 


0) M 


<0 


u 


5 


(0 




H 


tn.Q 


c 




•H 


<fl 


"I 


0J 


4-> T> 




•H 


i-l 


Ifl 


rH 


c 


< 


•H 



m in in in in in t/i in 
oooo oooo 



o o o <-\ 
*f ■sy Q. ^1 



n n n n 



> > 

fa fa 



> > 



c 
ceo 

CD O -H 

0) CniH 

P >i <D 
U H H 



ceo 

<u rH 

a) cn<M 
m >■ <u 

O Eh H 



u u 
> > 

fa fa 



c 

c o 

r-t 

>i a) 

H Eh 



u u 

> > 

fa Oi 

I j 



c 
c o 

O rH 

Cn<*H 
>i 0) 



rH rH rH rH 



cncncncn roronn 



^* ^ *3" ^T 



I 





u 






0) 






N 


• 




>1 


"3 




rH 


M 




(0 


<C 




c 







< 


H 




« 


Ifl 




H 


cu 




Q 


u 




2 


)H 

3 




c 







IB 


CO 




e 


CD 




a; 


fa 




o 






a) 


>H 




CQ 


•H 
< 




c 













^_^ 






£ 


>H 




ft 


•H 




ft 


rH 
"3 




o 


U 




o 






rH 


>1 




~^ 


XI 




0) 


-a 




rH 


a> 




(0 


•H 




o 


m 




to 


-H 


CD 




+J 


13 


<H 


M 


•H 


o 


CU 


H 




o 





■p 




r-j 


•H 


g 


,C 


e 


ft 


o 


•H 


ft 


■H 


rH 




>1 




rH 


c 


T> 


T 


■H 


0) 




> 


tJ 


CO 


>1 


0) 


<a 


i-H 


(1) 


cn 


o 


o 




fa 


X 


c 


* 


fa 


10 




* 


ft 




* 


w 



79 



Examination of Table 10 clearly indicates that some kind 
of a reaction occurred with white polyvinylchloride, tygon, 
and teflon tubing when exposed to the direct sunlight. The 
most significant reaction occurred with the teflon tubing, 
much to our surprise, which more than doubled the NDIR reading 
of the span gas concentration of 4l ppm. Of all the tubing 
exposed to the direct sunlight, only the green polyvinylchloride 
tubing appeared to provide good values of CO. Generally, the 
longer the exposure of the tubing to direct sunlight, the 
more stable the CO reading. In Test 4 in, Table 10, 
all the tubing was put into a black conduit to screen out 
sunlight. This test was made because of the results from the 
green polyvinylchloride. 

The results from Test 4 showed essentially no difference 
(+ 1 ppm) in the measured concentration and the known span 
gas value. It should also be noted that in Test 3, for the 
teflon tubing with 2 hours of exposure in direct sunlight, 
the CO concentration measured was 96 ppm compared to 100 ppm 
plus in Test 1. When the teflon tubing was placed inside 
the black conduit, the CO measured was 4l ppm (same as the 
span gas). The limited amount of data suggests that certain 
wave lengths of the incoming solar radiation may possibly 
cause a reaction inside the tubing which produces either 
CO or a compound which interfere in the NDIR analysis. 

The conclusion from the Tests 1 through 4 indicates 
that green polyvinylchloride and tygon tubing can be used as 
an intake line to sample CO. This assumes that the tubing 
has been exposed to direct sunlight for at least 3 hours prior 
to use. It is interesting to note that most of the recommen- 
dations stating that teflon was chemically inert in the NDIR 
analysis of CO were based primarily on experience of local 
air monitoring districts and air surveillance networks. 
In most all of these cases, the length of teflon tubing 
exposed in direct sunlight is minimal because all of the CO 
analyzers are located in buildings and the probe placed just 
outside a window. The shielding effect of the building and 
tubing support is not representative of field conditions when 
sampling along highways. 

Further studies were made on teflon tubing with different 
sunlight exposure times. These studies were also conducted 
at the Transportation Laboratory. For these studies, previous 
total exposure times ranged from zero hours up to one week. 
A known span gas of 41 ppm was used for comparison. Table 
11 is a summary of results. It is interesting to note that 
in Test 5 with the new teflon, the measured CO concentration 

80 



exceeded 100 ppm. This tubing was stored in a trailer 
and was not exposed to the direct sunlight until the test. 
This gave the same results as Test 1 on September 8, 1972. 
In Test 5s CO concentration measured in the early morning 
with 51 hours of previous exposure was 45 ppm, while that 
measured at midday was 59 ppm. This constitutes an error of 
12.2$ and 42.8$ from the known span gas concentration of 4l 
ppm. This again suggests that some wave lengths of the radi- 
ation received from the sun acts as a catalyst causing the 
reaction. However, the possibility that the tubing sample 
received from the manufacturer could have been contaminated 
should not be overlooked. 

In Tests 6 and 7» all the teflon tubing was exposed 
over the weekend to direct sunlight. The measured CO concen- 
trations under these conditions were within experimental 
error and agreed well with the known span gas of 4l ppm. 

Based on these studies, it is recommended that when 
teflon tubing is used for sampling CO, the teflon be exposed 
to atmospheric conditions for at least three days prior to 
use. 



81 



Q 
W 
U 

< 

SB 
O 
D 
O 
« 
B 
En 

Q 

W U 

W 3 

W H 

< m 
a. D 

Eh 

o 
u 5 

w 
o s 
EH 

a 

« 2 
H rtj 

a 

3 

Ch 

O 

W 
w 

B 

An 



en c 
c o 

•H -H 
■H P 

e m 

* 3S 
(A Q 



C 



■H 

X) P 

a> re 

M M 
3 P 

in c 

(0 0> 
0> o 

r: c 
o 



fd <u 

p e 

O -H 

e-< eh 

CO 0) 

3 M 

3 

•H CO 

> O 

a) a. 

ft H 



en 

C 0) 

•h a 



■H O 
U S3 



T3 








0> 


u 




u 


TD CO 


-a oi 




TJ 0) 


0) 01 O 


CD > 




Q) > 


w x: a. 


en 




CO 


O P X 







o 


a <u 4J 


ftp 




ftp 


X M £ 


XX! 




X x: 


Q) Q) +J tn 


<u en 




oi en 


> O -H 


•H 




•H 


« OCH 


CO <-t 




CO r-l 


rd C 


id C 




«J c 


3 M •> 3 


3 3 




3 3 


Oi t) co 


CO 




CO 


tnH C 


en 




en 


C -H CD P 


C P 




C P 


■4 n X U 


•H U 




■H O 


XI H tt) 01 
3 +J 0> U 


XI <D t> 
3 M C 


Xj 0> Tl 
3 M C 


P 3 -H 


-P -H 


o> 


P -H OJ 


rO >a 


•a .* 


-a X 


H 0) 


i-H 


o> 


rH 0) 


HC£0 


m q 


Oi 


HC1) 


< -H .p -P 


rtl-H 


3 


<-h 3 


01 


01 




01 


c en 


en 




en 


3 c 


c 




c 


co rd 


(0 




fd 


c u 


M 




u 


Cn C 3 








C 3 (0 01 


Oi 




0) 


•H (0 M 


M 




u 


C -P 3 


3 




3 


M P P 


P 




P 


O Ofi lOfc 


rd fn 




rd w 


ex: mo 


U o 




U o 


» oi r» 


0) H 




01 H 


rH C C ftP- 


ftoo 




ftoo 


O g 1 


e i 




e i 


OOOdli' 


0) ai 




0) O^ 


uzzem 


Eh t 




Eh ■* 



in o 


o> 


rH H 


n in 


H 


■q> o 


in 


-tr <«* 


«* "S" 


Q 


.H 








Z 

C 
id 

e 

X 

u 

0) 

m 
c 




CO CO 


CO 








M U 


U 


U. M 


X X 


>^ 


3 3 


3 


01 a) 


QJ 0> 


e 


o 





0> 01 


01 01 


a. 


x: x: x 


3 3 


3 3 


ft 


rH O 


i-H 


CN H 


CN rH 


o 


in 


in 


\ 


\ 


o 






.-H 


r-t 


rH 
0) 


^-s 








rH 


3 








rd 


a) 








u 


c 








CO 












c n 


c 


C C 


G C 


m 


o o 


o 








O 


rH r-K 


i-H 


■H i-H 


rH i-H 




mh MH 


MH 


MH m 


Mh MH 


p 


Oi Oi 


0) 


0) a) 


0> 0> 


•H 


Eh Eh 


H 


Eh Eh 


Eh Eh 


rH 

-o 

0) 


in in 


m 


\o VO 


p- r~- 


-a 

dJ 

01 

o 

X 

w 


<N 




(N 


<N 


* 


1 

rH 




r~ 

CN 

rH 
1 


i 

CN 

V 

en 





u 
cu 

N 






82 






DESCRIPTION OF DATA BASE 

The data base for this study (Appendix A) consists 
of hourly values of (1) carbon monoxide concentrations, 

(2) meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction), and 

(3) traffic volumes. The location and measurement procedures 
for these parameters have been discussed previously. The data 
base is described by the site location, bearing of roadway, 
geometry of highway design, and height of the wind speed 

and direction sensors above surrounding terrain. The data 

bases in Appendix A are divided into site location: Site 

1 - Santa Monica Freeway, Site 2 - Harbor Freeway, Site 3 

- San Diego Freeway at Weigh Station, Site 4 - San Diego Freeway 

at National Boulevard, and Site 5 - San Diego Freeway at 

122nd Street. 

Meteorological Data Base 

For the meteorological data base, the cloud cover 
and ceiling height were obtained from the U.S. Weather 
Bureau station at the Los Angeles International Airport. 
No measurements of these parameters were made directly at each 
site. However, cloud cover and ceiling height are generally 
a mesoscale phenomenon. Because of the homogeneity of the 
terrain for the sites on the Surveillance Loop and the close 
proximity (2 to 10 miles) to the Airport, these data were 
assumed to be representative for all locations. The wind 
speed and direction were measured at each site and are in units 
of miles per hour and degrees from true north respectively. 
The column labeled STAB is the estimate of the surface stability 
class of the atmosphere for each location. The surface 
stability classes were determined using methods employed by 
Pasquill (_3 ) , and from an objective system of classifying 
stabilities using meteorological observations as suggested 
by Turner (3). Turner's approach considers the cloud cover, 
ceiling height, wind speed, insolation, time of day, and season 
of year. The stability classifications are as follows: 

A = extremely unstable 

B = unstable 

C = slightly unstable 

D = neutral 

E = slightly stable 

F = stable „ 
83 



Stability Class A is associated with a daytime condition 
with light winds and clear skies. Stability Class D is 
associated with a day or nighttime condition with strong 
winds or overcast skies. Stability Class F is associated 
with nighttime, late evening, and early morning conditions 
with light winds and clear skies. In general the unstable 
atmospheric conditions near the ground surface for a microscale 
condition result in relatively low pollutant concentrations. 
On the other hand, a stable surface atmospheric condition 
restricts the dispersion of pollutants resulting in high ground 
level concentrations. 

The numbers above the wind direction, e.g., 5-2-72, 
0900, 3 3 are interpreted in the following manner: 

5-2-72 - represents the month, day, and year 
data were measured. 

0900 - means integrated average from 900 to 
1000 and beginning sampling time for 
that day. 

3 - indicates three subsequent hours, 

1000 to 1100, 1100 to 1200, and 1200 
to 1300. 

Carbon Monoxide Data Base 

Each CO measurement location is identified by a Probe 
Number ranging from 1 to 26 depending on the site monitored. 
The vertical and horizontal relationships of the probe locations 
with respect to the freeway are indicated in Figures 37 through 
44. They are also repeated and shown in Appendix A before 
the CO data base. The symbol (e.g. 1) means Probe 1 location, 
etc. The number below the probe number in the data base is 
the concentration of CO in parts per million (ppm) . If, in 
the data base, the number -1 appears, it indicates that 
no data are available. This means that (1) no measurement 
at this probe location was made for that particular day and/or 
hour or (2) possible equipment malfunction. Again as in the 
meteorological data base, the number below "Pollutant Concen- 
tration" indicates the month, day, year, beginning of air 
sample, and subsequent hours of sampling. 

Traffic Data Base 

The traffic data base is identified by the site location 
and highway geometries. The traffic data are divided into 
the following: on 



1) directional lane volumes (vehicles per hour) 

2) directional lane occupancy (percent) 

3) directional lane speeds (miles per hour) 

4) total vehicles per hour for both directions 

5) average speeds for both lanes (miles per hour). 

Occupancy is defined as the percentage of time that a 
traffic loop detector is occupied. By knowing the vehicles 
per hour, the occupancy, the average length of vehicle, 
and number of lanes, the route speed can be estimated using 
the following equation (7. ) i: 

R o _ vph 

nD ' CNL) x Occ. x 5280 

ALV 

where RS = route speed in miles per hour 

vph = vehicle per hour 

NL = number of lanes 

Occ = occupancy in percent (decimal) 

ALV = average length of vehicle in feet 

The ALV for the freeway site locations are as follows: 

Santa Monica, ALV = 19.84 feet 

All other sites, ALV = 21.38 feet 

When the number or symbol -1 occurs in the data base, 
this andicates that no data are available. The notation, 
"* = Derived Data", indicates that the speeds were calculated 
using the above equation. The average speed for both 
directional lanes is the arithematic average of both directional 
lanes rounded off to the nearest whole number. For the site 
located on the San Diego Freeway at the Weigh Station, 
no monitoring of occupancy was available. For this site 
the traffic volumes were generally in a free flow mode of 
operation during peak and off peak hours ranging from 45 to 
70 raph. These estimates were made by driving a State 
vehicle randomly throughout several time periods for a given 
day. g 5 



Time Period of Data Base 

The time period for the data base is given in Table 12. 

Table 12 
Time Period For Data Base 



Site 
Location 


MonthCs) 


Number of 
Days Sampled 


Total 
Hours 


Santa Monica 
4th Ave. P.O.C. 


May & June 


21 




95 


Harbor 
146th Street 


August 


8 




74 


San Diego 

at Weigh Station 


April & August 


13 




101 


San Diego 
at National 


August 


8 




52 


San Diego 

at 122nd Street 


Sept. & Oct. 


15 




83 


Limitations of Data 


Base 









All of the measurements in the data base were from the 
beginning of May through mid-October. Five years of historical 
air quality data from the Los Angeles Air Pollution Control 
District (LAAPCD) air monitoring stations at Lennox and Pomona 
were analyzed. The analysis indicated that the highest 
carbon monoxide concentrations within the Los Angeles Basin 
generally occur within the winter months (November through 
February). These air monitoring stations are located in close 
proximity to major surface streets. They measure the effects 
of local traffic densities and possibly aerodynamic eddies 
(_4, _8, and 9.) . They are not representative of general ambient 
levels that exist away from these influences. Similar effects 
have also been observed in this study and are discussed 
in detail later in the report. 

The LAAPCD stations can indicate the general seasonal 
trends in CO concentration. The highest values generally 
occur during the morning rush hours with very stable air. 
There is a greater chance for stable surface atmospheric 



86^ 



conditions to occur during the winter months (in absence 
of frontal activity) because of solar geometry and the amount 
of incoming radiation. The nights are longer and there 
is less incoming radiation during the morning hours (peak 
traffic) to destroy the surface based inversions. Due to 
project scheduling, monitoring was not done during the winter 
seasons where the expected ambient concentrations of CO would 
be the highest. Also limited data were acquired for conditions 
when the surface winds were parallel to the highway alignment. 
Some data were available with strong surface winds greater 
than 10 mph; however, no data were taken for light winds 
parallel to the highways under stable atmospheric conditions. 

Because the traffic patterns are nearly reproducible 
daily, the major cause for the CO variations is change in 
meteorology. For the study period, the daily meteorological 
conditions did not change significantly and much of the 
CO data monitored were very reproducible on a daily basis. 
This strongly indicates that to fully identify the important 
transport and diffusion parameters the monitoring program should 
cover the extreme ranges of meteorological conditions. This 
should include monitoring for seasonal variations in meteo- 
rology so that the extremes of surface atmospheric stability 
will be encountered. In light of the above discussion, one 
should not consider the measured CO concentrations represen- 
tative of the typical winter season. The data should be viewed 
as representative for the May through October season only. 



87 



DATA ANALYSIS 

A statistical analysis of the data was performed in order 
to evaluate the effects of the following variables on the 
carbon monoxide dispersion rates downwind of the sampling 
sites: 

1) The size and extent of the mechanical mixing caused 
by the turbulent wake of the vehicles on the 
roadway . 

2) The effect of surface roughness and associated 
microscale turbulence (a function of the land 
use both upwind and downwind from the various 
sampling sites). 

The rates of dispersion in both the vertical and 
horizontal directions were determined from the data. These 
dispersion rates are functions of atmospheric stability, 
wind speed, vehicle speed and spacing on the roadway, and 
ajacent land uses. These dispersion rates may or may not be 
applicable to other sites. 

The optimum spacing of the probes and the minimum sampling 
time necessary for an adequate hourly carbon monoxide average 
were also evaluated. 

Mixing Cell Variability 

Figures 47 through 55 show the locations of the probes 
at each of the sampling sites monitored. In addition,, 
the one hour arithmetic means (X) and arithmetic standard 
deviations (a) of carbon monoxide levels at each of the 
probes are indicated. 

For the depressed freeway section on the Santa Monica 
Freeway (Figure 47), a visual inspection of the means within 
the highway section ranged from 10.7 ppm to 17.2 ppm. The 
corresponding standard deviations ranged from 3.8 ppm to 
5.6 ppm. These values are for CO measured on both shoulders 
of the roadway and at the center of the roadway, at heights 
of 4 feet to 20 feet above the pavement surface. 

It is apparent from these data that the sides of the 
depressed freeway section tend to restrict the lateral disper- 
sion of carbon monoxide. This can be observed from the 
relative uniformity of the mean concentrations at these 
points. The uniformity is even more evident for the lower 

88 



probes Cat 4, 8, and 12 feet above the pavement). The 
homogeneity of the standard deviations is also surprising. 
The physical parameters that may cause changes in the 
standard deviations are: 

1) Traffic volumes and operating modes. 

2) Meteorology. 

3) Combinations of 1) and 2). 

If one considers the mechanical mixing cell to be a 
region where the turbulence caused by the moving vehicles 
on the roadway creates a homogenous mixing process, then 
one would expect a uniform concentration within this cell. 

If the standard deviations (a) of the measured CO values 
are considered to represent the extent of turbulent mixing 
in the air, then it is possible to evaluate the extent of the 
mixing process by looking at the c values. Within the 
depressed section, the a values range from 3.8 ppm to 5.6 
ppm while the a value at the 36 to 60 feet levels are lower. 
This indicates that there may be less turbulence in the 
air above the freeway than within the depressed section. 
The turbulence within the mechanical mixing cell is also 
greater than that at the higher probe locations. 

The relatively high standard deviations could possibly 
be due to large changes in traffic densities. In the absence 
of vehicles, the carbon monoxide levels would be very low. 
As a group of cars pass the sampling site, a "cloud" of carbon 
monoxide is released, causing the CO values to go up. This 
is the concept of what microscale modelers call the cloud, 
or "puff" model. This might indeed be the case for values 
averaged over a few minutes or less. However, since the 
traffic volumes are as high as 17,000 VPH, the traffic stream 
is probably too uniform for this to be the cause of the 
high a values when averaged over 60 minutes. Therefore, it 
can be concluded that on the roadway, mechanical turbulence 
is the dominant dispersion parameter. 

Another interesting observation of the dat_a in Figures 
47 through 55 concerns the downwind values of X's and a's. 
As mentioned previously, CO values were measured at 5> 17 9 
and 29 feet above the ground surface for all sites for_the 
downwind studies. There is little variability in the X's 
and a's for all of the levels at each site. The a's downwind 
at all levels for sites located in residential and open areas 
indicate that there is enough turbulence to produce a complete 

39 



mixing process from ground level up to 29 feet. For resi- 
dential areas this indicates that the mechanical turbulence, 
caused by the air flow over and around obstructions (i.e., 
houses, trees, etc.), and thermal turbulence provide 
thorough mixing in this region. For the open sites (on the 
San Diego Freeway at the Weigh Station and 122nd Street) 
the mechanical turbulence caused by the wind shear or momentum 
transfer of energy creates enough turbulent eddies to thoroughly 
mix the CO in this region. 

In order to plan for further monitoring using the minimum 
number of probes both on the roadway and in the downwind 
region, it was necessary to determine the temporal and spatial 
distributions for carbon monoxide adjacent to roadways. For 
a maximum benefit at a minimum cost, it was decided to combine 
the in-section and downwind probe locations for all future 
field sampling. For the two depressed freeway sections, 
the Santa Monica and Harbor Freeway sites, the average CO 
concentrations from the 4 to 20 feet levels are fairly constant. 
To test the homogeneity of the concentrations within these 
sections, the nonpararaetric statistical test, Friedman Two- 
way Analysis of Variance, was used. The nonparametric 
test was used rather than the parametric test because no 
assumptions are made about the distribution of the data, and 
nonparametric tests are most appropriate for non-random data. 
The Friedman Test was made for probes (1) through (15) and 
probes (3) through (17) for the Santa Monica and Harbor 
Freeway sites respectively. Analyses were made for each hour 
for the total time sampled at each site. 

For both sites, at the 5% level of significance, the test 
indicates that the spatial distribution of the CO values was 
significantly different for all probes for the hours sampled. 
Even though there is a statistically significant difference 
between all probes, one can still describe the probe location 
that would be most representative of the CO concentrations 
to which drivers on roadways are subjected by combining 
statistics and physical reasoning. As previously discussed, 
the mechanical mixing cell is defined as the region where there 
is a zone of intense mixing and turbulence. The height of 
the cell has been found analytically (10) and experimentally 
(11) to be approximately twice the height of a vehicle. This 
region should be fairly representative of the air breathed 
by drivers of vehicles using a highway facility. 

To supplement the Friedman Test a simple statistical 
averaging analysis was made using the mean CO values for the 
entire sampling period for the sites (Figures 47* 49 and 55) • 

90 



lO 



<0 

of 



<3J 



t- 


CD 


00 


00 


<M 


<M 


OJ 


IO 


0? 




IO 


00 


D 


(D 

1 


© 


® 


O 
CD 


_ 1 
CVJ 

m 


V 

^ 


"CD 
ro 




O ^ Ol IO IO 

* <r * io\«> 

io «f o io cS 

^ w *■ io n' 



I 



't * * * io 

in" (O* (0 of N 

^ w n 5 t 1^ 

oo o o — io \ 

io <*' <* * <■ 

J^" N" IO <J> •-" 

O j; N jj J 



O CD CVJ 00 <f 

CM «- *- 







>2 = H 



C\J 
CD 



CD 

CM 



o >- 



cr 
uj 

CD 

z 
UJ 

CD 
O 

or 
a. 

to 

UJ 

h- 
O 

z 

UJ 



© 



CD 
OO 

zr 
o 



oo 
o 

5 <" < 



Q 



Q 

I— 
OO 



- o 

5 






CJ3 



91 



0> 
CM 



ran 



r«> 



o>- 



C\J 



I 
,cm) 



ra» 



© 



G8 



m 


in 


»- 


«- 


m 


m" 


CM 


CM 



'^ 



<P4J 



CM 


IO 

CM 


CM 


10 

iri 


ro" 


*" 
N 


1 


© 

| 


1 


1 
CM 

m 


_ 1 


"to 
ro 



o 


en 


CM 


„_ 


CM 


^■* 


m 


m 



© © ® 



(£> 


in 


<r 


*- 


*— 


v 


<£ 


r-' 


«T 


ro 


to 


ro 



© © © 



CVJ 



© 

I 




© © © 
I J I 

8 2 v 




>2 = H 




a: 

UJ 
CD 

z 

UJ 

m 
o 
a: 

Q. 

(/) 
UJ 

r- 
O 

z 

UJ 



© 



5 £ 

° EE ^T 

6 1 -J 

> o o 

uj q <n 

Q o 

1=1 - h- 

<t - r— 

CO UJ 

B 5 

r— 

UJ I— 



CO 



CD 






92 





CO 


K 


a> 


CM 




en 


of 


u> 


*r 




* 


in 


IO 


(0 


£l 


~© 


® 
■ 


® 


rt? 


a** 


(£ 




"o 

(0 


. 1 
cvj 
m 


V 
* 


"t0 
fO 




CD 
C_> 



>- 



cc 

UJ 
CD 

z 



go 
o 
or 
a. 

c/> 

UJ 

o 

2 
UJ 



© 



U_ CO 

o 

CO 

o 



a 



22 
I 1 

U-I o 



g u»- 

Q_ 



°:i 



<: 
I— 
co 



UJ 



CD 



e? 



UJ 






o 

(V) 

© 



lO 



OS 



«• 


in 


»- 


^ 


0» 


o" 


<*■ 


M 



® ® © 



10 



® 



o 

If) 



tf> 



in 






© ®© © 



O 
(0 



CVJ 

m 






(£> 
ro 



ro 
ro 



O 



o> 



m 

ro 



ro 



lO 



0) 
K) 



G © 




s w, 



CM 



0) N ro 



Of o *- 
K at oo 

©®0 , 

"«> In "oo V 




,22 = H 



UJ 
CD 

5 

3 



UJ 
00 

o 

<r 

QL 

c/> 

LU 

H- 
O 

z 







o 




CJ 




uu 


>- 


o 


a 




=> 


c/5 


r— 


2Z 


oo 


o 




»— 4 


— i 


H- 


<c 


<C 


H- ^- 


»— « 


2 UJ 


> 


O _J 


UJ 


M < 


« 


^ <£ 


§ 


CD C/> 


<c 


o 


o 


. : l- 


y 


cj 


«X 


• I— 


r— 


° o 


CO 


qTZ 


Q 


•*s 


2= 


UJ 


<£ 


> 




•a; 


§ 


CO 


UJ 


-=r 


s_ 


r-H 


CD 
LA 





CD 



CVJ 



lO 



ro 



ID 
fO 



CM 
JO 

r?o> 



m 
ro 



in 






<n 
ro 



10 



0> 



CM 



oo 

iri 



u> 

© 

.1 .1 

CVJ _ 



IO 

cm 



O 

ro 

<f 

in 



CM 



o 

CM 

<n 
ro 



to 

id 
o 

ID 
< 



(D © © 



to 

ro 



o 



in 
of 



( 



"0. 
CM 



® ©E 



I 



CM 
IO * 



© © ©E 



is 



IO 
CM 



© © 






UJ 

m 

3 
2 

UJ 
CD 
O 

<r 
a. 

en 

UJ 

l- 
O 
2 
UJ 



© 



95 



CO 



in 

ro 

© 



oo 



10 
ro 

© 

O 
c\J 

of 
ro 

© 

in 

CM 

of 

© 

ro 
csi 

N* 
(0 

© 



I 



% 



© 
O 
CM 

in 

ro 

© 



5: 



O 
O 



CD 

fO 



X- 



O >- 

C_> Q 



O OO 



ce: 

hr- 
OO 



CD 

3T -J 

O <* 
—i o 

I— o 

OO I— 



^ O 



CD 



CM •! 

IT d" 



tri 



3DN3d M/«(S) 



- q o o «i 

n in id n" in 

Kf n" q" of r»" 

o> cri — — ' cm 



Is 



<; N o n iq 

id id S io ui 

oT to q q" <d" 

0> Ci cm ro 4 s 



= S 



^ GO CO CO 

in tri in id 






IO N O O CM f: 
N K f^ 0> O 

©0©© © 
"O "to "cvi "co V 

CM — — 
33N3J M/H© 

CM 

•ri 

CM 



© 



_ O 



1 



m 



00 
fO 



o 

CO 



<r 

UJ 
CD 

Z 

Ul 
CO 
O 

cr 
o. 

co 

UJ 

h- 
o 

z 

UJ 



© 



o 


>- 




CO 


=3 




U_ 


1— 




O 


CO 




CO 


T*- 




7TZ1 


o 




o 


•—4] 




1— « 


H- 




H- 


O 


/^N 


<C 


UJ 


Ul 


1—4 


CO 


_l 


> 


1 


< 


UJ 


T~ 


a 


a 


•— ■ 


CO 


g 


g 


o 


<a: 


—1 




;=* 


CQ 


»- 


TZZ 




o 


<c 


•J 


f* 


1— 


^ 


o 


CO 


o 




3 


1—4 






1— 




^ 


< 




w-w 


— ■» 










3 


o 




21 


UL- 




CM 






m 







CJ3 



96 






ID 



0> 
0) 

(0 



I 



cvi 
b 



CNJ (0 GO 

cvi cvi cvi 

«o io~ *-7 

oi d ; 



©0© 

n n m 

Kl IO * 

» g 3 

co 2 *■ 

QAM 
* 5f * . 

* - - k 

cm r- to r 
m" <r * 

©0© 

"CM "00 V 



© 

ID 



(0 
IO 







C\J 



io 



I 



TO* 





CD 






t_> 


>- 




LL_ 


ZD 




O 


1— 
OO 


cc 


CO 




03 


f— > 


Q 


2 




.— 1 uJ 

o ° 


13 
2 

UJ 


t— « 

> 


03 
O 


UJ 


1=1 c/> 


or 

Q. 


Q 


o 


(/) 


as 


g H- 


UJ 


n 


— i H 


o 


z: 


pq 


Z 


i— 


td Z 


UJ 


oo 


•a: ^- 







2= •— i 

z: z= 

UJ h- 






CD 



97 



(£)-(§) -o^- 



o 



(0 

to 




01 


o* 


O) 


<M 


to 


in 


*o 


10 


r- 


t>- 


m 


w 


to 


t\l 


m 


CO 


o 


- 


to 


t 


©©(D©© 


n 


*- 


o 


0) 


CM 


10 


t^- 


f>- 


f^ 


00 


ro 


to 


«_ 


« 


CM 


r- 


^ 


h- 


r- 


00 


©0©@© 
i i • i i 


i 
"o 


i 

"to 


1 


i 
"oo 


1 


CVI 


"»- 


"" — 







<r 






UJ 






00 


o 




2 


c__> 




3 






Z 


u_ 


>- 




O 


Q 


UJ 




ro 


CO 


OO 


I— 


o 


T3^ 


oo ^7 


<r 


O 


Id 


Q. 


t— H 


z: _» 


UJ 




o ^ 


1- 

o 

z 

UJ 

o 


> 


C-J (/) 


UJ 


LU 


Q 

a 


co O 

z= *~ 


1 




•— 1- 


0> 


Q 


LU O 




zr 


> Z 




«=c 




h- 






CO 


Q 

Z 




Q 


CNJ 




z= 


CNI 




<C 


H 



<c <c 






CID 



<^J 



co~ 
® 



o> 



ro 






cb 



CO 



00 


to 


- 


N 


(\J 








00 


00 



© ® 



r<^ 



en 


<r 




to 


(0 


r^ 

10 


ro 


r- 


^s 


00 


00 


en 


D 


© 


@ 


0) 


10 


to 


u>_ 


s 


(O 



1 

CM 








h- 

n 


CD 
N 


to 

d 


cvi 


o" 

fO 







CD 






C_> 






U_ 


>- 




CD 


ro 


QC 


C/0 


h- 


UJ 


zzz 


oo ^ 


CD 


CD 


UJ 


2 


| — i 


<=i _j 


Z3 
Z 


<C 


2 <t 


UJ 
CD 
O 


> 
IxJ 

£=5 


DOWNW 
TO SC 


a. 


(=1 


in 


<C 


, h- 


UJ 


zr 


£o 


o 


<£ 


<C Z 


z 


r— 




UJ 


oo 


Q 


o 




Z 


1 


Q 


CNJ 




"Z^ 


CNI 


© 


<C 


i— 1 



«=C <C 



LA 



CD 



For each highway section a mean CO value was calculated for 
the 4, 8, and 12 foot probes for both shoulders and the median, 
These probes were considered to be well within the turbulent 
mixing cell. This approach involved using the mean CO concen- 
trations for the entire data base for the 9 probes located 
at the 4 3 8 and 12 foot locations. Then the arithmetic mean 
for the lower paired probes of 4 and 8 feet (.6 probes) and 
the upper paired probes of 4 and 12 feet C6 probes) were 
calculated. The percent change (or error) of the mean CO 
concentrations was compared to the 9 possible probes. This 
analysis was made for the cut and fill sections. 

From the above analysis, the maximum error for both the 
lower and upper pairs of probes was less than 12$. It was 
concluded that the probes at the 8 feet height were really 
not necessary and only the 4 feet and 12 feet probes will be 
used in future field work. The 4 feet and 12 feet probe 
locations will allow one to study the possible effects of 
heavy duty vehicles on turbulence in the mechanical mixing 
cell and the consequent effects on downwind transport and 
dispersion. 

Vertical and Horizontal Dispersion Rates 

An analysis was made to characterize the relative 
importance of vertical and horizontal dispersion rates. The 
data used for this analysis were the averages of the hourly 
CO concentrations measured at each site (entire data base) 
for a particular probe location. The data used for each 
site are shown in Figures 47 through 55. Horizontal and 
vertical dispersion curves are shown in Figures 56 through 
58. The gradients for the at-grade sections were not analyzed 
because of the limited height of CO measurements. 



There are two concentration gradients defined as follows: 
Vertical Gradient ; 



C l" C 2 



Horizontal Gradient = 



Li u -, — U r-. 

_C = C 1" C 2 
1 d^ 



100 



o 
o 




o 








IO 








to 


H 








UJ 


o 




o 


Id 


o 




o 
to 


U. 

z 


U_ 

o 






£ 


to 

UJ 






UJ 


_J 




o 
m 

CM 


2 

UJ 

3 


u_ 
o 

(XL 

a. 


<J) 




Q. 


„j 


o 




UJ 

z 


<t 


cr 




o 




o 


cr 

UJ 


UJ 

> 


o 

CM 


-J 


> 


n: 






o 


i— 




(T 




^- 




Ul 


«* 






h- 




cr 




Z 
UJ 


-J 
< 


o 

U- 


o 


o 


h- 




m 








^™ 


2 


o 






o 


M 






cr 


cr 






u. 


o 






UJ 






o 


o 






o 


z 






*~ 


< 


CD 






1- 


m 






(O 








o 


o 

u_ 




o 








in 









Wdd 00 NOI1VcJ1N30NO0 

101 



o 
o 




o 








m 








ro 


1- 








Ul 


O 




O 


Ul 


O 




o 


u_ 






ro 




u_ 






z 


O 






H 
Z 
UJ 


co 

UJ 






2 


U. 




o 
m 


O 

Q_ 






Q. 


-J 


o. 




5 


<t 


o 




O 


QJ 






1— 






UJ 


cc 


UJ 


o 


z 


UJ 


> 


o 


_l 


> 


<t 






Q 


3= 




or 




1— 




UJ 


<t 


CO 




H 




<a- 




Z 


_l 


^w. 


o 
in 


UJ 

o 




o 


5 


o 


u. 




o 


M 






<r 


ac 






u. 


o 






UJ 






o 


o 






o 


z 






«- 


< 


r*- 






K 


lO 






co 








Q 


u_ 




o 








m 









Wdd 03 NOLLVH1N30NO0 

102 




o 
o 



o 








in 








rO 


K 








UJ 


o 




o 


UJ 


o 




o 

rO 


u_ 


u. 






z 


o 








<n 






h- 


UJ 






z 


_i 




o 


5 


O 




IO 


UJ 


CE 




(VI 


1 


Q- 






0. 


_J 


UJ 

> 




5 


O 


<t 






h- 


o 




Ui 


CC 




o 
o 


z 
-J 


UJ 

> 


C\J 
C\J 






Q 


*~ 




tr. 








UJ 

z 


-J 


o 

u_ 




UJ 


<t 




o 


u 


h- 




m 


2 


O 






o 


M 






q: 


cr 






u. 


o 






UI 






O 


o 






o 


z 






*~ 


< 


CD 






h- 


m 






C0 







5 52 



VMdd 00 NOI1VH1N30NO0 

103 





Where — =■ is the vertical concentration gradient over 
the highway section, — == is the horizontal 
gradient downwind from the roadway, 

and C,, C„ are measured average CO values at two 

different locations in parts per million 
Cppm> 

Z.,, Z„ are the distances in feet from the ground 
surface that C, and C ? are measured. 

The subscripts X and Z in the above gradient equation 
refer to the horizontal and vertical gradients respectively. 

The method for calculating these gradients was to compute 
a vertical gradient over the roadway on the median and an 
equivalent horizontal gradient from the median to the nearest 
downwind probe. The word "equivalent" is used because an 
attempt was made to make the distances over which the changes 
in CO values were measured (Z-, - Z ? ) and (X, - X ? ) equal in 
the gradient equations. This is important so that actual, 
rather than interpolated gradients can be compared. However, 
the physical geometry and sensor locations of the different 
highway sections prevented the exact equivalence of (Z-, - Zp) 
and (X, - Xp). With this in mind the calculated gradients 
should be considered to be order of magnitude estimates. 
The vertical change in CO concentration (.C, - c o^z for the 
roadway was taken, where possible, to be trie difference between 
the CO values at 60 and 4 foot levels at the median. The 
horizontal change in CO concentrations (C, - Cp)v- corresponds 
to the difference between the CO values in the mixing cell 
at the median and the downwind probe closest to the roadway. 
Table 13 shows the calculated vertical and horizontal gradients 
in ppm per foot along with the probes considered and the 
distances between the horizontal (X) and vertical (Z) probes. 

The data summarized in Table 13 indicate that the vertical 
dispersion gradients for all sections monitored were much 
greater than the horizontal gradients. It might be hypothesized 
that this vertical mixing is caused by (1) differences in 
temperature of the exhaust gases emitted from vehicles (approx- 
imately 250°P) and the ambient air causing a vertical accel- 
eration of pollutants, (2) different thermal properties and 
heat fluxes of the concrete pavement and the land adjacent 
to the roadways, and (3) a combination of both. In any event, 
this analysis does imply the importance of measuring the 
vertical pollutant distributions over roadways for future 
studies . 

104 



EH 

fa 

V. 

S 
(^ 

fa 



co 



ro 



■-3 



P 

(U 
■H 

u 






0) 

o 

c ~ 
fd -p 
-P u-j 
10 

■H 
Q 



4J 



U 

c — 

<d -P 
+J H-i 

W *-' 

H 

Q 



CO 

CD 

X>. 
O 

u 

fa 



>i 
rd 
£ CD 

CD -P 
CD -H 
U CO 
fa 



<£> 


o 


in 


ro 


rH 


V£> 


00 


en 


■^ 


o 


o 


o 



00 
CN 



I 

O 



rH 
CN 

o 



00 



(N 

H 

I 

O 



CD 

cd 

XX 
•H -P 

C *■ 








l 

oo 



n 

CN 

00 

o 



in 



oo 



(d 

cu 
CD 

fa 



£ >i 




fd 


U 


fd £ 





•P 0) 


.q 


c cu 
f3 ^ 


u 
id 


CO Cm 


K 



CD 
> 

Xi 

-P 



<o 



O 
CN 

I 

CN 



IT, 



VD 



00 

I 

CN 



G 
CN 
CN 

H 

-P 
fd 



-P 
fd 



cu 

•H 

Q 

C 

fd 



fd 

CD 

cu 

CO fa 



ins 



Effects of Surface Roughness on Dispersion 

Land use adjacent to the roadway is considered an important 
parameter to describe the downwind transport and diffusion 
of pollutants. The land use can be characterized aerodynam- 
ically in terms of surface roughness. This is analogous to 
the effects of wall roughness on water flow in pipes. It can 
be shown, from fluid dynamics theory, that the larger the 
surface roughness elements, the greater the viscous shear within 
the fluid layers, near the surface. This viscous shear is 
associated with large energy dissipation rates. The result 
is a large rate of transfer of vertical momentum from one shear 
layer to adjacent layers. These are called mechanically 
produced turbulent eddies. Near the ground surface, the degree 
of mechanical turbulence is a function of the wind speed and 
the height of the surface roughness elements. 

There is also another form of turbulence that plays an 
important role in the dispersion of pollutants. This is thermal 
turbulence. Thermal turbulence is caused by nonuniform heating 
of the ground surface by the sun. The air near the ground 
surface is warmed as a result and tends to rise. The surface 
of the earth cannot support a vacuum, therefore, cold air aloft 
descends to take its place thus creating a convective cell 
with vertical air movement. Thermal turbulence can be considered 
to be a function of the thermal conductivities of the land 
surface Chouses, trees, concrete, etc.), incoming radiation 
and wind speed. It is most dominating during the daytime with 
light wind and clear skies. It is the interaction of mechanical 
and thermal turbulence that enhances the diffusion of pollu- 
tants . 

For this preliminary study the effects of surface roughness 
on the generation of turbulence were evaluated. Figures 59 
through 62 show typical sites where the temporal and spatial 
distributions of CO were measured. There are two striking 
effects that can be observed from the measured data. At the 
Santa Monica site, where the surface roughness heights range 
from 20 to 30 feet, there is enough mechanical and thermal 
turbulence present to thoroughly mix the air from the ground 
ourface up to at least 29 feet. The same applies for the Harbor 
Freeway site where the surface roughness heights range from 
15 to 20 feet above the ground. Surprisingly, for the two 
open sites at the Weigh Station and the Fill Site, the combi- 
nation of turbulence caused by wind shear and thermal effects 
also was great enough to thoroughly mix the air from the ground 
surface up to 29 feet. However, there is a significant effect 

106- 



of surface roughness on the downwind distance over which the 
CO from the freeway approaches ambient levels. For a given 
set of meteorological and traffic conditions, ambient levels 
are approached about 200-300 feet downwind in areas with 
moderate surface roughness. For the open section (Figures 
6l and 62) with small surface roughness effects, ambient levels 
are generally approached about 400 feet or more downwind. 
This indicates that the larger the surface roughness, the 
greater the turbulence and thus the sooner the pollutant levels 
return to their upwind values. Figures 63 through 65 are 
cumulative frequency plots showing downwind CO for different 
highway designs. 

From this analysis of the downwind transport and diffusion 
of CO, recommendations for the location of air sampling locations 
to describe the microscale region can be made. For all the 
sampling sites monitored, air sensors placed at intervals of 
100 to 150 feet apart in the downwind direction are adequate 
for measuring CO. This distance downwind should extend at 
least 400 feet from the edge of the nearest highway pavement. 

Since the vertical distribution of CO is fairly uniform, 
it is necessary to monitor only at one height up to 29 feet 
above the ground surface downwind of the highway. This is 
because atmospheric turbulence causes a thorough mixing in 
this area and there is little change in CO concentration with 
respect to height. It is therefore recommended that CO 
measurements be standardized at 5 feet above the ground surface 
since this is the typical height at which air is inhaled. 

With these recommendations a spatial sampling plan can 
be designed to describe adequately the downwind transport and 
diffusion characteristics of CO for different types of land 
use and highway geometry. 

Minimal Sampling Plan For Spatial Distribution of CO 

Based on the above findings, a minimum sampling plan to 
measure the temporal and spatial distributions of CO emitted 
from a line source is shown in Figure 66. The sampling plan 
shown will serve two purposes: (1) to monitor the air 
quality to which motorists are subjected while driving, and 
(2) to characterize the downwind transport and diffusion of 
CO. The above design does not apply to those areas where 
localized topographic effects alter the surface winds. A 
monitoring plan for those areas will require a special investi- 
gation beyond the scope of this study. The sampling plan 
presented here should be applied to urban and rural areas 
with relatively flat topography. 

107 



l/> 



in 

z 
o 



o 

o w 

ro «/> 

< 

II -I 

UJ ° 

-I *_ 
o 

z — 

< J 

z < 



S2 uj 
or -i 
ui o 
I- z 
o — 

< en 

DC - 

< Q 
X UJ 
O X 

tn 2 

is 

O -J . 

<r < > 
t uj z o 



(VI 



© © 



If) 



© 



£ ? OT CO 



3 UJ > 







C_> 
O 

Q_ 

LU 

> 



V>i 







CVJ «fr 



<0 

to 



s> 

<J> 
O CVJ 

I o 
o n 

cvj O 1 

2 o o 

oo" ■■ F 

"* UJ u. 

< _ £E 
Sl-I-D 



© © © 



© © © 




a: 

UJ 

oo 



UJ 
CD 

o 

AC 
0. 

CO 

UJ 

h- 

O 



© 



© © 

J J 

CO «- 



© 

l 



>2 = H 



CD 



O 
CD 

|— 
CO 
i— i 

a 



CO- 
CO 



en 



cd 



_j 

< 
u 

CO 




z 
g 

t 
o 

§ 

u 

-i 
< 
u 

O 

-I 

o 

£C 
O 

u 

£ - 
2 l=> 





</) 




O 




»- 




</> . 




f? H 




"> 




o uj 




< -J 




£ m 




3 " 




£ » 




<■> z 








</> </> 




</> . 


to 


uj< 


(/) 


Z uj 


< 
u 


x oc 
o< 

O -J 


> 


ac < 


i- 


"z 


_i 


dD 


£9 


■i < 


ac </> 


H 


3 UJ 


TQi (A 


w a: 



? T 
© © 



© © 



© © 



© © 



<34 



© ©@ 

- J - 

O <\J «fr 

ID iO ^J" 




CD 



ce 

UJ 
CD 



UJ 
CD 
O 

or 
o. 

</> 

UJ 

t- 
o 

z 

UJ 



© 



o 
o 



& • 

- o 

of 9 

CM ■• 

H ~ ° 

to .. u. 

3 Mil. 

O 5 < 

3 * ac 

< H H O 




© © © 



,Z2 = H 



UD 



CD 

CD < 

O 

2- CO 

2 o 



P3 •- 
ZZ o 

CO 



OO 



CD 
CO 



CD 






IO 



109 



<n 

z 
o 

a 

z 
o 
o 



< 
o 

o 

_1 
o 

£E 
O 
UJ 

I- 
s 



< 



ii ii 

Q UJ 

lli -I 

UJ U> 

Q- 2 

«/> <x 

Q O 

z z 



to . 

y z 

t- o 

UJ UJ 
(- to 
u 

<r UJ 

go 

< "* 
o o 



5J M 



Q © 



00 GO 



I 

CM 



O 
O 

00 

O 

I 

CM O 

"". ° <-> 
<r .. £ 

. uj *»• 
o ^ < 
3 £ oc 

< I- l-|3 






© © © 



(<£> 



lO 



II 



© © ©i 
© © © 






O 

»—— i 

I— 

I— 

CO 

m 

CD 



O 

m 



QC 


1— 




UJ 


<c 




CO 








CD 
CD 


-'-% 


2 


LL. 


UJ 


UJ 


CD 


1 

< 


CD 
O 
<£ 

a. 

CO 

UJ 


CD 

»— i 

h- 

ZD 
CQ 
»—i 


o 

CO 

o 
J- 


1— 

o 


1 — 


o 


2 

UJ 


CO 


s ~ - ' 



Q 



© 



Q 



CO 



CO 
CD 



110 



z 

to 
CO 

z 
o 



a 

o °- 

2 o 

-J O 

< N IO 

O 

— n ii 

o 

Q UJ 

JU J 

owe* 

(E Q- Z 
W) < 

te o o 
Lu? z 

5 J * 



to 
u 



to 
tr 



o <0 

S i 
< ? 

co=> . 

CO _ U 

z *-> — 

tH-W 

to ^ 
2 b. u- 

U| Q. Z 

o o 5 
£ H -z 

IE < 5 

3JO 
I/1U.Q 



<^J 



8 



«- cj 



H 2 < 
CJ _ QC 
O I- I- 






Q 






Z 






Csl 






CNJ 






•-H 






h- 




UJ 


«=C 




CO 


CD 




2 


CD 




Z) 






z 


LL_ 
CD 




UJ 




- — s 


CO 


^=- 


!-J 


o 


CD 


_J 


ce 




< 


Q. 


1 — 


O 




ZD 


CO 


Ul 


PQ 


o 


h- 


ce: 


H 



© 






Q_ 



CNI 
CO 



CD 



\ 



CO 



<a; 


a: 


H- 


r» 


CO 


o 




=c 


in 


^ 


CD 


< 


»— i 


lu 


LU 


Q- 


~^ 


i 




LL. 


h— 


UU 


«=C 


CD 


>- 


od 


<c 




^g 


^ 


LU 


< 


LU 


LU 


Od 


Q_ 


LL. 






Q 


O 


LU 


CD 


Z 


LU 


>— i 


« 


§ 




o 


"^* 


CD 


<C 


N-^ 


CO 





o 
o 



\ 

\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 






\ 



\ 



\ 






N 



\ 



\ 






\ 



\ 
\ 



o 

in 



o 

o 

ro 



Z 

o 

o 

LU 

o 

z 
< 

Y- 

o 



o 

lO 



JL^- 



o 

00 



o 



o 



o 

CVJ 



CD 

CD CO 

<C 
U_ LU 
CD Od 

<C 
GO 



CD 
Del 
CD 

:*: 

CD 

<C 
PQ 



CD 



CO 



CD CD 

LU 

h- CO 



LU 


LU 


^~ 


Q 


^^ 


<C 


t— i 


O^ 


<C 


CD 


h- 


1 


h- 


I— 


<C 


<=c 


K\ 




UD 





CD 



QNnOdDXDVa dO lAIdd I + > 3WI1 dO % 



112 



o 




o 




Q_ 


•"N 




CO 


- 


q: 


LU 


3 


> 


O 


«=c 


nz 


=c 


^ 


h- 


< 


-=r 


LU 




Q_ 


h- 


1 


<c 


U- 




LL. 


>- 


CD 


<c 




7^g 


oe» 


LU 




LU 


m 


Od 


< 


U_ 


UJ 




CL_ 


<c 




c_> 


Q 


I—* 


LU 


s>r 


Z 


O 


►-h 


s: 


CQ 




S 


<£ 


o 


h— 


LJ> 


t^ 


>— ' 


<£ 




CO 





\ 



o 







CD 








C_> 








LL_ 


_ 






CD 


CO 






CO 


LU 






1 


CXl 






LU 


<C 




, 


> 






h- 


LU 


^^ 




U. 


_J 


<C 




1 




PQ 




1 


(=3 


ce: 




o 


r^ 


=D 


o 


z 


ZD 




o 




CD 


"Z^ 


ro 


£ 


ee: 


i— i 




z 


CD 






^ 


co 




c_> 






o 


<c 


CD 




Q 


pq 


H^ 






u_ 


CD 




CD 


LU 
CO 




z 


1— 






< 




a 




1- 


LU 


LU 




(/) 


s: 


GO 




Q 


"^^ 


CO 




i— i 


LU 






<c 


Csl 






h- 


Q_ 


o 




i— 


LU 


m 




<c 


(=1 


^- , 




<JD 





CD 



O 
O 



o 

00 



o 

CD 



O 



o 



ONnOU9>IOV8 JO lAidd \ + > 3WI1 JO % 

113 



LxJ 


V) 


> 


cc 


<C 


3 







Q 


zc 


Z 




04 


^ 


CNJ 


< 


•— 1 


UJ 




Q_ 


1— 


1 


«=c 


u. 




u_ 


>- 


CD 


<c 




3: 


oB 


LxJ 




LxJ 


^ 


ex: 


< 


u_ 


UJ 




Q_ 


O 




CD 


Q 


UJ 


UJ 


t—t 


z 


Q 


»— H 




PQ 


z: 


21 


<£ 


O 


00 


CD 



t \ 



s 



J N 












m 








<r 




1 

CD 
CD 

Ll_ 
CD 


OO 






CO 


<C 






1 


LxJ 






LXJ 


ce: 






> 
LxJ 
1 


<c 




1 




LxJ 




O 

Z 

z 


a 


Q_ 


O 

ro 


CD 

cc: 

CD 


CD 
1— 

3 







CD 


Lx_ 







PQ 


•— • 




LJ 


LX_ 


CO 




O 


CD 


2= 




z 




CD 




< 
(0 


h- 


•— • 




^" 


1— 




LxJ 


CD 




5^" 


LxJ 







1— 1 


CO 






<c 


1 






1— 


_J 


O 




h- 


1— — 1 


10 




<c 


LJ_ 






LA 
UD 





CD 



O 
O 



O 
00 



o 



O 



O 



-J O 
O 



0Nn0H9>!3Va dO Wdd IT > 3WI1 dO % 

114 



O-s' O 



O 



150 



0-»" 



150 



150 



\0->2'0 o 
0-4' o o 




DEPRESSED SECTION 



O O 



150 



150 



O-s' O 



150 



150' 



0-«2'0 o 
0-4' o o 



o 



o 



o 



150 



150 




AT-GRADE SECTION 



O-12'O O 

0-4-0 Q 




150 



FILL SECTION 



150 



o o 

//AW/AW 



150 



FIG 66 TYPICAL SAMPLING PLANS TO MEASURE THE 
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OP CO ON OR NEAR 
HIGHWAYS 
(not to scale) 

115 



Spatial Distribution of CO During Periods 
of High Concentrations 

The highest CO concentrations measured during the sampling 
period occurred on October 6, 1972 from 0800 to 0900 in the 
morning. On this particular day, CO sampling was being done 
on the highway fill section (San Diego Freeway at 122nd Street). 
The highest measured one hour CO value was 46 ppm, measured in 
the median at a height of 4 feet above the pavement. Upwind 
values of CO measured simultaneously ranged from 33 to 35 ppm. 
The carbon monoxide levels for this hour are shown in Figure 67. 

It is interesting to note that the vertical concentrations 
of CO on the upwind side of the roadway are relatively uniform, 
ranging from 33 to 35 ppm. This indicates that even in this 
period of stable air (stability F was estimated for 0700 to 
0800 and stability B was estimated for 0800 to 0900) there 
is enough atmospheric turbulence near the ground surface to 
thoroughly disperse CO, at least up to 29 feet above ground 
level. 

It is also interesting to note that if the ambient CO 
concentration were considered to be 33 ppm (lowest value 
measured in Figure 67) that the maximum contribution of CO 
coming off the roadway at the 4 foot median is only 13 ppm. 
Upon analyzing the data from all sites it can generally be 
said that the highest contributions of CO from the roadway 
occur at the median probe 4 feet above the pavement. The 
concentrations at this point range from about 10 to 25 ppm 
above background. This, of course, applies to the meteorol- 
ogical and traffic conditions that existed in the Los Angeles 
areas for those days monitored. These values, or ranges, should 
not be representative for other roadways where traffic and 
meteorology differ significantly from those conditions in Los 
Angeles. Typical CO concentrations upwind and downwind from 
the highway for all sites range from 1 to about 5 ppm above 
background levels for all meteorological and traffic conditions. 

Further Statistical Studies 

When analyzing the CO data, there are various statistical 
distributions that may exist. One possible distribution is 
the gaussian or normal distribution which is characterized 
by a mean and a standard deviation. These are measures of 
the central point and spread of the well known bell shaped 
curve. Previous studies made by Saltzman (12) and Larsen (13) 
in analyzing air pollutant data indicated that a normal curve 

116" 




CO 

cd 



en 



c_> 



UJ 
CD 



UJ 

en. 



00 



UJ 



— • <c 



z cd 

CD 



CD 



UJ 

m 
o 
tr 
o. 

to 

UJ 

O 
2 
UJ 
O 



© 



UJ 

—I 

< 
o 
05 

o 

I- 

h- 
o 



Lul 



O 
c_> 



IS 



UJ 



o 

o - 

i» do ~ 



o 



to 



H S < 

o - cc 

O t- H 



117 



generally does not describe the distribution. Larsen (13) 
has shown that the log-normal distribution more accurately 
describes the pollutant concentrations measured in the 
atmosphere. In the log-normal distributions the concentrations 
must be transformed to their logarithms of base 10. Once this 
transform has been made, a statistical analysis of the data 
can follow. The antilogarithm of the standard deviation of 
the logarithm is the standard geometric deviation. It has 
been suggested by Saltzman (.12) that log normal distributions 
are applicable only if the sampling is random. The concentra- 
tions of pollutants fluctuate in cycles depending on the 
meteorological conditions. Random samples of pollutants must 
be collected over a period of time long enough to include many 
cycles. Sampling over a period of one month can possibly 
provide values which deviate seriously from random sampling 
relationships (12). Because of the shortcomings of determining 
the statistical distribution of CO for a short period of record, 
no attempt was made in this study to determine if these data 
followed a log normal distribution. 

The importance of the distribution of pollutant data should 
be emphasized. If the distribution is known, statistical infer- 
ences can be drawn concerning the CO concentrations in the 
microscale region. Also, once the distribution is known, the 
frequency of occurrence of exceeding air quality standards 
can be determined for a given time period. The use of the 
above information can be of great value in air quality studies 
to assess the impact of transportation systems on the air 
environment. It is recommended that further research be 
conducted in this area as such work is beyond the scope of 
this preliminary study. 



118 



REFERENCES 

1. Ranzieri, A. J., Bemis, G. R. , "Air Pollution and 
Freeway location, Design and Operation - Overview of 
Project," California Department of Transportation, 
Transportation Laboratory, to be published. 

2. Minutes of the Second Advisory Committee Meeting "Air 
Pollution and Roadway Location, Design and Operation," 
Los Angeles, California, June 29-30, 1972. 

3. Beaton, J. L.; Skog, J. B.j Shirley, E. C.j and Ranzieri, 
A. J., "Meteorology and Its Influence on the Dispersion 
of Pollutants From Highway Line Sources," California 
Division of Highway Research Report No. CA-HWY-I4R- 657082 (1 )■ 
72-11, April 1972. 

4. Grisinger, John E.., "Survey of Los Angeles County Air 
Pollution Control District's Meteorological and Air 
Monitoring Sensor Exposures," California Department of 
Transportation, District 07, May 19 73. 

5. Field calibration made by Don Crow, California Air 
Resources Board, August 17» 1972. 

6. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Compilation of 
Air Pollutant Emission Factors," Second Edition, 
April 1973. 

7. Grant, Ian, California Department of Transportation, 
Freeway Operations, District 07 3 telephone conversation. 

8. Johnson, W. B., et al, "Field Study for Evaluation of 
Urban Diffusion Model for Carbon Monoxide," Stanford 
Research Institute, January 1971. 

9. Ott, W. "An Urban Survey Technique For Measuring the 
Spatial Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentrations in 
Cities," Department of Civil Engineering, Stanford 
University, October 1971. 

10. Eschenroeder, A. Q., "An Approach for Modeling the 
Effects of Carbon Monoxide on the Urban Freeway User," 
General Research Corporation, January 1970. 

11. California Department of Transportation, Research 
Laboratory, unpublished study, "Project Smoke," 
April 1971. 

119 



12. Saltzman, B. E., "Simplified Methods for Statistical 
Interpolation of Monitoring Data," Journal of the Air 
Pollution Control Association, February 1972. 

13. Larsen, R. I., "A Mathematical Model for Modeling Air 
Quality Measurements to Air Quality Standards," Environ- 
mental Protection Agency, November 1971. 



120. 



APPENDIX 



BAG SAMPLING STUDY DATA BASE 



121 



SITE 1 



SAN MONICA FREEWAY 
AT 
4th AVE. P.O.C. 

DEPRESSED SECTION 



0,22. 



SANTA MONICA FREEWAY Q tfTH AVE P.O.C. 
MAY 2»1972 TO JUNE 2»1972 

bearing: N 80 i2»b3»*E 

b LANES EACH DIRECTION 

22 FT MEDIAN 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT = 2b6 FT 

BOTTOM WIDTH OF CUT = 162 PT 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = lhb FT 

DEPTH OF CUT = 2M- FT 
SIDE SLOPES = 211 

WIND MEASURED AT 10 METER HEIGHT (OR EQUIVALENT) 

METEORLOGICAL DATA 



DATE=b-2-72 



STARTING HR= 900 



NO. OF HRS= 3 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


9 


200 


k 


5 


C 


20 


240 


3 


2 


R 


201' 


230 


7 


2 


B 



DATE=b-3-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


9 


2^0 


2 


8 


D 


9 


2<S0 


3 


8 


D 


23'» 


khb 


3 


b 


B 


20 


190 


t+ 


2 


B 


20 f i 


220 


4 


2 


A 



DATE=b-<+-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




IL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


2b 


220 


b 


8 


D 


27 


230 


b 


8 


D 


30 


220 


^ 


8 


D 


3 b 


210 


b 


8 


D 


2 b 


230 


b 


6 


D 



123 



PAGE 2 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 4TH AVE P.O.C 



DATE=b-b-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




IL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


40 


240 


b 


8 


D 


uo 


kbit 


3 


5 


C 


40 


240 


4 


5 


C 


40 


210 


b 


5 


D 


40 


220 


7 


b 


C 



DATE=b-8-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STAB 


-1 


80 


3 


-1 


-1 


27 


80 


3 


8 





2b 


120 


4 


b 


C 


2b 


90 


4 


b 


c 


200 


lbO 


4 


2 


A 



DATE=b-9-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


200 


190 


k 


2 


R 


kbb 


190 


3 


2 


8 


lb 


200 


4 


b 


C 


200 


kbb 


b 


2 


B 


kbb 


220 


7 


2 


B 



DATE=b-10-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OP HRS= 4 





WIND 


WTNO 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


20 


40 


2 


2 


B 


12 


lbO 


3 


8 


D 


12 


bO 


4 


8 


D 


18 


380 


4 


b 


C 



124 



PAGE 3 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY fa) i+TH AVE P.O.C. 



DATE=b-ll-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= <+ 



CEIL. 

200 
200 
200 
200 



WIND 
DIRE. 

100 

mo 

170 
£50 



WIND 
MPH 

2 
2 
3 
4 



SKY 
CODE 


2 
? 




STAR. 

R 
B 
B 
B 



DATE=b-12-72 STARTING HR= 70f» 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

-1 
2 

200 

200 

-1 



WIND 
DIRE. 

130 
lftO 
210 
240 
2<+0 



WIND 
MPH 

2 
2 

3 
b 
ft 



SKY 
CODE 

-1 
ft 
2 
1 

-1 



STAB. 

-1 

D 
B 
B 
-1 



DATE=b-lb-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 



CEIL. 

6 

ft 

11 

-1 



WIND 
DIRE. 

lftO 
130 
170 
160 



WIND 
MPH 

2 
2 

b 



SKY 
CODE 

A 

ft 

ft 

-1 



STAB. 

D 
D 
D 
-1 



DATE=b-16-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= i+ 



CEIL. 

22 
23 
2b 
26 



WIND 
DIRE. 

170 
190 
210 
230 



WIND 
MPH 

3 
3 

6 



SKY 
CODE 

ft 
ft 
b 
b 



STAB. 

D 
D 
C 
D 



12-5 



PAGE <f 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY & <+TH AVE P.O.C. 

DATE=b-l7-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




TL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


30 


220 


b 


ft 


D 


30 


230 


4 


ft 





30 


210 


3 


ft 


D 


27 


220 


*+ 


8 


D 






DATE=b-lft-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


160 


200 


2 


ft 


C 


2b 


200 


3 


ft 


B 


230 


190 


<+ 


ft 


B 


300 


lftO 


*f 


ft 


8 



DATE=b-19-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 



CEIL. 

bb 
3fa 
60 
3b 



WIND 
DIRE. 

170 
190 
190 
lftO 



WIND 
MPH 

3 
6 
b 
7 



SKY 
CODE 

b 
b 
ft 
ft 



STAB. 

C 
D 
D 
D 



DATE=b-23-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

17 
19 
22 
2b 

200 



WIND 
DIRE. 

130 
l«+0 
1**0 
1U0 
210 



WIND 
MPH 

3 
3 

b 



SKY 
CODE 

8 
ft 
ft 
8 
2 



STAB. 

D 
D 
D 
D 
A 



126 



PAGE b 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 13 4TH AVE P.O.C. 



DATE=b-2*i-72 STARTING HR= 700 



CEIL. 



WIND 
OTRE. 



WIND 
MPH 



NO, OF HRS= b 



SKY 
CODE 



STAR 



21 

2 b 
2 b 
2b 
20 



130 
130 

140 

140 



k 
4 

b 
4 



8 
8 
8 
8 
8 



D 
D 
D 
D 
D 



DATE=b-2b-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

19 
19 
33 
18 
3b 



DATE=b-28-72 



CEIL, 

23 

23 
20 
30 



WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


220 


3 


210 


3 


200 


b 


220 


7 


230 


8 


2 STARTING HR= 


WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


280 


2 


280 


3 


2b0 


3 


230 


b 



700 



SKY 
CODE 

8 
8 
b 
8 
b 



SKY 

CODE 

8 
8 
8 

8 



STAR 

D 
D 
D 
D 
C 



NO. OF HRS= 4 



STAB. 

D 
D 
D 
D 



DATE=b-3l-72 



STARTING HR= 800 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


140 


140 


2 


b 


R 


140 


220 


4 


8 


C 


140 


2)0 


4 


8 


B 


180 


230 


8 


b 


B 



127 



PAGE h 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY ft <*TH AVE P.O.C. 

DATE=6-l-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=10 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


\y> 


180 


2 


5 


C 


r-> 


130 


2 


tf 


C 


Si 


lUh 


2 


2 


B 


20 '; 


S-SfJ 


3 


2 


A 


20<» 


2b0 


*4 


2 


8 


300 


2*+0 


7 


7 


B 


i>ot< 


2*+0 


10 


7 


C 


30 d 


230 


10 


7 


C 


500 


230 


8 


7 


C 


301' 


2*0 


7 


7 


C 



DATE=8-2-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 1 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




CEIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STAB. 


12 


210 


4 


ft 


D 



128 



<OJ 




>- 

LU 

OH 



>- 



CO 



QC 
Ld 
CO 

Z 



CD 
O 

cc 

Q. 

CO 

UJ 



© 



<C —J 



CD 



or 

CD 



CO 

■> 
CO 



c_> 

CD 



LU 

-I 
< 
O 
CO 



1- 
o 



uj cr 

O !— 



CO 



lO 



^M 



(2>) (*) (t- 



O "<\J <vT 

co m ^- 



® 

"to 
ro 



t 




q: 

CD 

Z 

UJ 
CO 

o 

QC 
Q. 

</> 



O 

z 

UJ 

o 
I 

© 



>- 

LU 
UJ 



CD 



CD 



CO 
CO 



c_> 

CD 



>- 



CO 

o 



cd 

LU 
CO 



CD 
CD 



UJ 
< 

o 

CO 

o 

I- 

o 



LU ^3" 
O J— 



CB 

to 



(JD 



130 



SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 4TH AVE P.O.C. 
MAY 2rl972 TO JUNE 2>1972 
REARING: M 80 12»53»E 

5 LANES EACH OTRECTTON 

22 FT MEG I AM 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT = 256 FT 

BOT'OM WIDTH OF OUT = 1.62 FT 

WIDTH OF ROAnWAV =160 FT 

DE^TH OP CUT ~ 24 FT 
SIDE SLOPES =2:1 

POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS 



DATE=5-2-72 



STARTING HR= 900 



NO. OF hRS= 3 



PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 U 12 13 14 15 ) 6 17 18 19 20 21 2? 23 2^ 

5 4 5 4 4 5 4. 5 5 16- 14 12 8 8 6-1 3-1-1 3 -1 -1 3 -1 

4 2 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 -1 10 7 5 6 4-1 3-1-1 2-1 -1. ? -1 

2 3-1 12022875332-1 1-1-1 -1 -1 -1 



DATE=5-3-72 



STARTING H»r 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 



PRORE NUMBERS 
8 o 10 1.1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2; 



23 24 



•1 3 ^ -1 3 5-1 3 5 19 18 14 10 

•1 3 3 -1 3 3 -1 3 3 14 13 1 I 8 

■1 4 6-1 3 5-1 3 5 13 12 9 7 

■12 2-112-112886 3 

1 -1 -1 1-1 2 9 9 7 4 



8 


7 


-I 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


6 


^ 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


u 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


6 


5 


-1 


3 


-1 


-3 


3 


-I 


-1 


3 


-1 


3 


3 


-1 





-1 


-1 





-1 


-1 





-1. 


3 


3 


-1 





-1 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 



DATE=h-4-72 



STARTING HR= 70'^ 



MO. OF HRS= 5 



PROBE N'JMRERS 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1Q 20 21 22 23 24 



1 3 


6 


-1 


3 


6 


-1 


3 


ft 


18 


19 


1J 


8 


7 


7 


-1 


5 


-1 


-: 


L 2 


-1 


-1. 


2 


-1 


1 3 


7 


-1 


3 


7 


-1 


3 


7 


17 


19 


11 


8 


6 


5 


-1 


3 


-1 


-' 


I 2 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


1 3 


4 


-1 


•*> 


5 


-1 


3 


5 


13 


13 


8 


7 


5 


4 


-1 


2 


-1 


-: 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


1 3 


4 


-1 


3 


4 


-1 


3 


4 


12 


1. 1 


7 


6 


4 


3 


-1 


2 


-1 


-' 


( 1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 


1 2 


3 


-1 


2 


4 


-1 


2 


4 


10 


10 


ft 


4 


3 


3 


-1 


1 


-1 


-■ 


1 


-1 


-1 





-1 



131 



PARE 2 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY Q 4TH AVE p.O.C. 



OATE=5-ft-72 



STARTING HR = 70 r > 



NO. OP HRS= 5 



2 3 



PROBE NUMBERS 
ft 10 11 12 13 14- 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 



1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


— 1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


— i 


-1. 


_i 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-i 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


- 


i -l 


-1 


1 


3 


6 


-1 


3 


ft 


-1 


3 


F> 


2n 


17 


13 


« 


7 


7 


-1 


r> 


-1 


-1 


? 


-1 


-' 


1 2 


-1 


1 


3 


4 


-I 


3 


4 


-1 


3 


a 


15 


1.3 


10 


7 


6 


ft 


-1 


p 


-1 


-1 


2 


-' 


[ -' 


l 2 


-1 


1 


3 


4 


-I 


3 


4 


-1 


3 


4 


14 


11 


ft 


5 


4 


4 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1. 


i 


-1 


l -: 


| 1 


-1 


3. 


2 


3 


-I 


2 


4 


-1 


2 


4 


13 


10 


A 


a 


3 


3 


-1 





-1 


-1 





-1 


-■ 


I 


-1 



OATE=5-ft-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OP HRSr ft 



PROBE NUMBERS 
ft 9 10 1i 12 13 14 15 16 17 1.8 .19 20 21 22 23 24 



-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 - 



4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


ft 


-1 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


ft 


3 


2 


> 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


P 


3 


2 



1 -1 -1 -1 -I 

4 7 14 .12 10 

3 5 14 12 10 

3 4 11 9ft 

2 4 11 9 7 



■1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 - 

6 ft ft -1 2 -1 - 

7 ft -1 -1 2 -1 - 
4 4 a -x 2 -1 - 
4 3 3-1 1 -I - 



I -1 -1 


L -1 


-1 -1 


1 2 -1 


L -1 


3 -1 


1 2 -1 


L -1 


2 -1 


1 2-1 


-1 


2-1 


1 1 - 1 


. -1 


1 -1 



OATE=5- c >-72 



STARTING H^?= 700 



NO. OP HRS= 5 



ft 


7 


10 


7 


7 


9 


ft 


3 


4 


7 


3 


4 


ft 


3 


3 


4 


ft 


4 


4 


7 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


-1 



2 3 



PROBE N U M B E R S 
ft 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1ft 19 20 21 2° 23 24 



ft ft 21 21 17 13 11 10 - 

5 ft 17 16 13 Q ft 7 - 

4 7 14 14 11 ft 7 7 - 

3 4 1110 ft 5 4 ^ - 

? 410 9 7 4 3 3- 



1 ft 


-1 


-1 


ft 


-1 


-' 


1 ft 


-1 


1 3 


-I 


-1 


3 


-1 


-; 


I. 3 


-1 


1 3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


- 


I 3 


-1 


1 2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-' 


1. 2 


-1 


1 1 


-1 


-i 


1 


-1 


-. 


i i 


-1 



OATE-5-10-72 STARTTNG HR= 700 



NO. OP HRS= 4 



2 3 4 

4 4 4 

4 7 3 

3 3 3 



PROBE NUMBERS 
ft 9 10 IT 12 13 14 15 1ft 17 1ft i.o 20 21 22 23 24 



*> 



4 4 4 a 4 £3 £0 14 10 

4 7 3 4 7 20 17 13 Q 

3 3 3 3 3 14 13 10 7 

2 3 2 2 3 13 li ft 5 



Q 


7 


-1 


6 


-1 


-1 


ft 


-1 


-.1 


5 


-1 


ft 


7 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


ft 


ft 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-i 


3 


-1 


4 


;* 


-t 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-I 



132 



page 3 

santa monica frefwa/ 13 4jh ave d .o.c. 

OATE=ft-lt-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OP HRS= a 

PR08E NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 b 6 7 8 ^ 10 U 12 13 If 15 16 17 18 19 ?0 21 22 23 24 

7 ft 10 7 8 10 7 7 9. 29 26 '21 '.14 12 11 -1 5-1-1 6 -1 -"• ft -1 

ft 6 8 5 6-1 ft 6 8 22 20 lft 10 Q 9-1 4 -1 -1 4 - 1 - 1 4 -1 

4 U 6 ^ 4 5 4 4 5 16 14 10 8 7 * -l U -t -1 3-1-1 3 -1 
-1 -1 -1 -1 -J. -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -.1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

0ATE=b-1.2-72 STARTING ^R- 700 NO. OP HRS= b 

PRORF NNMRERS 

1 2 3 4 b 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2 23 ?4 

-1 -1 -1 -.1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 - 

7 8 10 7 8 10 6 8 9 24 21 18 13 11 10 - 1 5 -1 -1 b -1 -1 5 - 

5 6 8 5 6 8 b 6 ft 19 16 13 10 8 8-1 5-1-1 5 -1 -J ft - 

3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 14 13 9 7 5 4-1 3-1-1 3-1-1 3 - 
-1 -1 -1. -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -! -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 - 

OATE=5-15-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OP HRSr 4 

PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 lb 1ft 17 1ft 19 20 21 22 ?3 24 

4 b 8 4 ft 8 4 ft ft 24 2? 17 9 ft 7-1 3-1 -1 3 -1 -1 3 -1 
4 4 ft 4 4 6 4 4 6 1ft 14 12 8 ft 7-1 3-1-1 3-1-1 3-1 
4 ft 6 ft ft 7 'ft ft 7 14 12 10 7 7 6 -1 3-1-1 3 -1 -1 3 -1 

-1 -1 -I -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 '-! -1 

0ATE=ft-16-72 STARTING HR= 70o NJO. OP HRS= 4 

PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 ft 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1ft 19 20 21 2° 23 ?4 



4 


6 


9 


4 


ft 


Q 


4 


ft 


9 


23 


21 


17 


ii 


9 


8 


-1 


2 


-1. 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


3 


4 


6 


3 


4 


7 


3 


4 


7 


20 


17 


14 


9 


8 


7 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


3 


3 


ft 


3 


3 


ft 


3 


3 


5 


14 


12 


10 


6 


5 


b 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


P 


-1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 1 


ft 


7 


4 


3 


3 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1 


? 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 



133 



PAGE 4 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAV 4TH AVE P.O.C. 



0ATE=5-17-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OP HRS= 4 



3 



1 


4 


6 


-1 


4 


6 


-1 


4 


1 


u 


ft 


-1 


4 


6 


-1 


4 


1 


a 


4 


-1 


?S 


4 


-1. 


3 


1 


3 


4 


-1 


25 


4 


-1 


3 



PROBE NUMBERS 
b 6 7 6 9 10 11 12 1.3 14 J 5 16 17 18 IP 20 21 22 23 24 



7 22 20 15 10 
7 20 17 14 P 

4 15 13 11 7 

5 13 11 ft 6 



p 


7 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


ft 


7 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


6 


5 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


S 


4 


-1 


2 


-I 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 



0ATE=5-lft-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



MO. OP HRS= 4 



PROBE NUMBERS 
3 4 5 6 7 ft P 10 1! 12 13 1.4 1.5 16 17 1ft IP 20 21 2? ?3 24 



7 27 23 -1 13 -1 

ft 22 20 16 10 ft 

7 16 14 l 1 ft 7 

5 14 13 10 7 ft 



1 


5 


7 


-1 


5 


7 


-1 


5 


1 


5 


7 


-1 


5 


ft 


-1 


5 


1 


4 


5 


-1 


4 


6 


-1 


4 


I 


3 


4 


-1 


3 


5 


-1 


3 



ft 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


7 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


5 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 



DATE=b-19~72 STARTING HR= 70'> 



NO. OF HRS= 4 



1 2 



PROBE NUMBERS 
3 4 5 ft 7 ft P 10 11 12 1.3 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 



I 


5 


-1 


-1 


5 


8 


-I 


5 


ft 


2? 


1ft 


14 


8 


7 


6 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


5 


-1 


3 


5 


17 


1.4 


12 


8 


7 


ft 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


P 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


1 


3 


'+ 


-1 


3 


5 


-1 


3 


5 


1.3 


H 


Q 


ft 


5 


4 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1 


.1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 


1 


3 


4 


-! 


3 


4 


-1 


3 


5 


12 


.1.0 


7 


5 


4 


3 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 



nAIE=5-23-72 



STARTING MR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 



.*> 



5 



7" 



PQQBE NUMBERS 
ft P 10 1.1 12 13 14 15 16 17 1A IP 20 



1ft 20 1ft 17 22 1ft 19 ?A 21 20 25 24 20 25 27 -1 -1 - 

12 1ft 14 13 17 1ft 15 IP IP 16 20 ?o 1ft 1.9 25 -1 -1 - 

ft 9 11 9 13. 11 10 -1 13 11 13 14 1» -1 15 -1 -1 - 

ft 7 ft 8 ft ft 9 9 P 9 13 10 10 -1 11 -1 -1 - 

6 6 6 7 8 8 ft 8 8 ft 13 9 8. 9 9 — <1 -1 - 



-I 
-1 
-1 
-1 
-1 



3 
3 
2 
I 



134 



PAGE ft 

SANTA MONICA FREEw/AY Q 4TH AVE ^.O.C, 



0ATE=ft-24-72 



STARTING HR = 70H 



NO. OP HRS~ 5 



















PRO 


8 E 


N '• 


J M 


« E R 


S 








1 


2 


3 


a 


5 


ft 


7 


8 


9 10 


ii 12 


13 


iu 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


17 


20 


I ft 


19 


2^ 


17 


20 


22 


21 2- 


24 24 


22 


27 


■244. -1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


2 


13 


13 


12 


1.3 


14 


13 


US 


IS 


16 1ft 


18 17 


16 


18 


20 -1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


3 


10 


9 


o 


12 


1.1 


i ; 


'2 


1 ; 


12 13 


14-13 


1 '<■ 


14 


14 -1 


-1. 


-1 


_ 1 


2 


8 


8 


8 


9 


u 


a 


10 


9 


1 l 


12 11 


? 1 


1 3 


12 -1 


-1 


-t 


-1 


2 


9 


9 


9 


10 


1 '■ 


10 


TO 


i 'i 


1 ' ' ! 


14 1 2 


12 


14 


13 -1 


-1 


_ 1 


-1 


2 



0ATE=ft-2ft~72 



S TAP T TNG HR= 70' 



NO. 



HRS= ft 



















P R 


8 F 




N ' 


J M 


8 E R 


s 








1 


2 


3 


4 


ft 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


14 


1ft 


10 


16 


17 


12 


17 


19 


14 18 


22 


1ft 


17 


2^ 


17 -1 


-1. 


_i 


-1 


2 


10 


11 


1 !, 


12 


12 


12 


13 


14 


14 14 


15 


15 


13 


16 


16 -I 


-1. 


-1 


-1 


2 


8 


8 


9 


Q 


Q 


10 


10 


1 X 


1 ' 1 


13 


13 


9 


14 


14 -1 


_i 


-1 


-.1 


1 


8 


8 


7 


8 


9 


8 


q 


10 


A 10 


12 


Q 


9 


13 


10 -1 


-1 


„i 


-1 


1 


8 


8 


7 


A 


9 


8 


9 


11 


9 It 


1 3 


10 


1 


14 


10 -1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


1 



DATE=ft-26-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



MO. OF HRS= 4 



















PRO 


8 E 


N i 


J 'VI 


p E R 


s 




1 


2 


3 


it 


ft 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


I J «2 


13 


14 


1ft 16 


17 I Q 1 Q 


20 


1 ! 


1 3 


19 


13 


14 


21 


13 


16 


24 14 


18 28 


15 


!9 


30 -1 


-1 -1. -1 


a 


10 


9 


13 


1 * 


1 


1 s 


1 1 


12 


1 7 13 


1 4 19 


1 4 


1 U 


22 -1 


- 1 - 1 - 1 


3 


9 


9 


c, 


c, 


10 


1 1 


Q 


12 


1 2 11 


1 4 13 


1 i 


1.4 


1ft -1 


- 1 ~ 1 - 1 


2 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


c 


7 


9 


8 9 


10 1 


Q 


1 l. 


1 i -1 


-1 - 1 - 1 


n 



OATE=ft-31-72 



STARTING u^- AO 1 



MO. OP HRS= 4 



3 



22 23 20 23 -l 21 

17 1. ft 1 ? 1 « 1 ft 1 ?\ 

1? 12 12 12 14 13 

8 A 8 10 <■» 9 







PRO 


8 E 


N 1 


J M 


8 E R 


S 








7 


8 


9 10 


.1 3 1 2 


13 


14 


1ft 16 


17 


1 8 


19 


20 


24 


-1 


23 2ft 


-1 27 


2 ft 


2P 


29 -1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


Q 


18 


19 


18 19 


21 20 


20 


21 


20 -1 


-1 


_i 


— ! 


p 


12 


14 


13 13 


16 I ft 


14 


17 


18 -1 


-1 


-1 


_i 


5 


li 




9 13 


12 V. 


?3 


1 3 


12 -J 


_i 


-1 


-1 


3 



135 



PAGE 6 

SANTA MONICA PHEF.WA* Q 4TH AVE P.O.O 



0ATE=6-l-72 



STAR TING HH= 700 



MO. OP- HRS=10 



PR DRP NUMBERS 
9 10 I? 12 13 14 IS 16 .17 



J.fl 1.9 20 



16 l.Q 1.7 I? 21. Ifi 18 22 20 20 25 19 21. 25 26 14 12 11 10 

15 18 20 3.5 19 21 16 -1 23 17 23 2* 18 2^ 30 13 1J 1 9 

3.U i/i 16 j. 5 1.5 1.7 14 16 18 16 1ft 1,9 17 19 21 10 10 ° 9 

12 13 14 ia 1 u ia 13 15 15 15 16 16 15 17 16 10 9 ft 8 

o 1 1. 10 IX 13 12 1 ? 13 13 13 

ft ft Q 9 9 1111 9 12 111- 

ft Q ft 9 ft 910 10 Q 12 11 

9 Q 9 10 10 11 12 11 12 -1 12 

ft 10 10 -1 12 12 12 13 1^ 14 1.4 15 16 15 6 5 -1 

9 9 10 .11 11 12 14 13 16 16 13 -1 19 15 -1 6 -1 



ft 


ft 


9 


9 


7 


8 


ft 


A. 


? 


? 


ft 


7 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 



6 


A 


ft 


s 


3 


a 


5 


a 


4 


2 


<+ 


a 


a 


3 


2 


5 


5 


u 


3 


1 



nATE=6-2-72 



STARTING M*- 70'T 



NO. OP HRS= 1 



p»08E NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 ? 6 9- 10" li 12 13 14 15 16 1.7 18 19 20 

-1 15 -1 -1 17 -1 -1 19 -1. -1 20 -1. -1 22 -I 10 9 7 6 3 

PTLP OOES NOT EXIST 



136 



SANTA MONICA FREEWAY Q 4 TH AVE P.O.C. 
MAY 2 * 1972 TO JUNE 2 1 1972 
BEARING! N 80 12 f 53"E 



5 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
2? FT MEDIAN 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT = 256 FT 
BOTTOM WIDTH OF CUT = 162 
WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 160 FT 



FT 



DEPTH OF CUT = 24 FT 
SIDE SLOPES =2:i 



TRAFFIC 



DATA 





0ATE=5- 


-2-72 


STARTING HF 


!= 90U 


NO. 


OF 


HRS= 


: 3 






EASTBOUND 




WESTBOUND 






TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 






VPH 


SPEED 


5233 


.10 


39 


3669 


• 08 


34 






8902 


37 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 






-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 






-1 


-1 



DATE=5-3-72 



STARTING HR' 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUNO 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9529 


• 11 




65 


7361 


• 10 




55 


16890 


61 


9562 


.15 




48 


6954 


• 11 




48 


16516 


48 


7819 


.09 




65 


6202 


• 08 




58 


14021 


62 


7416 


.07 




70 


5905 


.07 




63 


13321 


67 


7236 


• 08 




68 


6649 


• 08 




62 


13885 


65 




DATE=5- 


-4« 


-72 


STARTING HR= 700 




NO. OF 


HRS= 5 






EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC, 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9850 


.14 




53 


7401 


.15 




37 


17251 


46 


9492 


.14 




51 


7026 


.11 




48 


16518 


50 


8069 


.08 




70 


5948 


.08 




56 


14017 


64 


7207 


.07 




70 


6081 


.07 




65 


13288 


68 


7155 


.07 




70 


6497 


.08 




61 


13652 


66 



137 



PAGE 2 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 13 4TH AVE P.O.C. 



DATE=5-5-72 





EASTBOUND 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


9252 


.14 


50 


9008 


.18 


38 


8598 


.13 


50 


7503 


.09 


63 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 



ING HF 


!= 700 




NO. 


OF 


HHS: 


= 5 






WESTBOUND 








TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 






VPH 


SPEED 


7264 


.19 




29 






16516 


40 


6^12 


.16 




32 






15920 


35 


6005 


.10 




45 






14603 


48 


6142 


.10 




46 






13645 


55 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 






-1 


-1 



DATE=5-8-72 



STARTING HK= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEEO 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


7706 


.08 




70 


6579 


.09 




55 


14285 


63 


1722 


• 06 




70 


5762 


• 08 




54 


13484 


63 


7266 


• 06 




68 


5777 


.07 




62 


13043 


66 


6845 


.08 




64 


639 7 


.08 




60 


13242 


62 



DATE=5-9-72 



STARTING HHZi 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC, 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9359 


• 12 




59 


7081 


.14 




38 


16440 


50 


9202 


.14 




49 


6552 


.13 




38 


15754 


45 


8774 


.09 




70 


6169 


.09 




52 


14943 


62 


-1 


-1.0 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


7163 


.08 




67 


6883 


.08 




65 


14046 


66 



DATE=5-10-72 STARTING HH^ 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8240 


.15 




41 


7205 


.19 




29 


15445 


35 


9125 


.13 




53 


6799 


.14 




37 


15924 


46 


8341 


.09 




70 


5H09 


.08 




55 


14150 


63 


7344 


.07 




70 


5837 


.07 




63 


13181 


67 



138 



PAGE 3 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 13 4TH AVE P.O.C. 



DATE=5-ll-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EASfBOUND 




WESTBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


occ. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO 


VPH 


SPEED 


9356 


• 14 


50 


7206 


• 14 


39 


16562 


*+5 


9467 


.15 


47 


6892 


• 13 


40 


16359 


44 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1,00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1,00 


-1 


-1 


-1 



UATES5-12-72 STARTING HH' 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


••1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-i 


■»i 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-l. 00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


mm 1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 



DAfE=5-15-72 STARTING HR^ 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9363 


• 14 




50 


7129 


.15 




36 


16492 


44 


8923 


• 12 




56 


6 745 


• 11 




46 


15668 


52 


8351 


• 09 




70 


5881 


• 08 




55 


14232 


64 


-1 


-1,00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 




DATE=5- 


-16-72 


STARTING HR= 700 




NO. OF 


HRS= 4 






EASF80UND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9479 


.14 




51 


7337 


• 17 




32 


16816 


43 


9352 


.16 




4«4 


6844 


.15 




34 


16196 


40 


8857 


• 13 




51 


5857 


• 08 




55 


14714 


53 


7117 


.07 




70 


5941 


.07 




64 


13058 


67 



139 



PAGE 4 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY 4TH AVE P.O.C. 

DATE=5-17-72 STARTING HR=: 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9688 


.13 




56 


7301 


.15 


37 


16992 


48 


9510 


.15 




48 


6942 


• 06 


65 


16452 


5b 


8175 


• 08 




70 


6025 


• 06 


57 


14200 


64 


7174 


.07 




70 


6045 


.07 


65 


13219 


68 



DAT£=5-18-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO, OF HRS= 4 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


PH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


~1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 



0ATE=5-19-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9171 


.17 




41 


7178 


.17 




32 


16349 


37 


8788 


.13 




51 


6703 


.17 




30 


15491 


42 


8370 


• 13 




48 


5880 


.09 




49 


14250 


49 


7296 


.09 




61 


6173 


.09 




52 


13469 


57 



DATE=5-23-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OP HRS= 5 





EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC, 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO 


VPH 


SPEED 


9556 


• 14 




51 


7329 


.17 




32 


16H85 


43 


9355 


.16 




44 


6858 


• 12 




43 


16213 


44 


8444 


.09 




70 


6009 


.08 




56 


14453 


64 


7469 


.07 




70 


6214 


• 08 




58 


13683 


65 


6968 


• 08 




65 


6784 


.08 




64 


13752 


65 



140 



PAGE 5 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAr U 4TH AVE P.O.C. 



date=5-24-72 



STARTING HK= 700 



NO. OF HKS= 5 





EAST80UND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9600 


.15 




48 


7448 


.16 




35 


17048 


42 


9411 


• 14 




51 


657 7 


• 10 




49 


15988 


50 


8364 


.09 




70 


6249 


• 08 




59 


14613 


65 


7181 


.07 




70 


6102 


.05 




70 


13283 


70 


7017 


.07 




70 


6588 


.08 




62 


13605 


66 




DATE=5« 


-25-72 


STARTING HK= 700 




NO. OF 


HRS= 5 






eastbound 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG, 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9781 


• 14 




53 


7463 


• 14 




40 


17244 


47 


9477 


.13 




55 


6924 


.11 




47 


16401 


52 


8250 


• 08 




70 


5867 


• 08 




55 


14117 


64 


7367 


.07 




70 


6144 


• 08 




58 


13511 


64 


-1 


-1,00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 



DATE=5-26-72 STARTING HH= 700 



NO. OF HRSr 4 





EASTBOUND 






WESTBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9600 


• 14 




52 


7470 


.15 




37 


17070 


45 


9414 


• 15 




47 


6810 


• 11 




47 


16224 


47 


8316 


• 08 




70 


5901 


• 08 




55 


14217 


64 


7757 


.07 




70 


6429 


.09 




54 


14186 


63 



DATE=5-31-72 STARTING HR= 800 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





EAST80UND 






WES WOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


9506 


.15 




48 


6956 


.14 




37 


16462 


43 


8278 


.09 




69 


6179 


.09 




52 


14457 


62 


7571 


• 08 




70 


6555 


• 08 




62 


14126 


66 


7191 


• 08 




68 


6889 


.09 




58 


14080 


63 



141 



PAGE 6 

SANTA MONICA FREEWAY Q 4 TH AVE P.O.C. 





DATE=6- 


•!■ 


-72 


STANTING HF 


tr 700 




NO. 


OF 


HRS: 


=10 






EASTBOUNO 






WESTBOUND 








TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 






VPH 


SPEED 


9497 


.14 




51 


7236 


.16 




34 






16733 


44 


9239 


• lb 




46 


684b 


• lb 




34 






16084 


41 


8452 


.10 




64 


6188 


• 08 




58 






14640 


61 


7159 


.07 




70 


6415 


• 08 




60 






13574 


65 


7014 


• 08 




66 


7122 


• 08 




67 






14136 


66 


6969 


.07 




70 


6618 


• 08 




62 






13587 


66 


725S 


.08 




68 


6880 


• 08 




6b 






14135 


66 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 






-1 


-1 


8368 


• 12 




52 


937 7 


.13 




54 






17745 


53 


7221 


• 2kf 




2b 


9432 


.14 




51 






16653 


39 




DATE=6- 


-2- 


-72 


STARTING HH 


(= 700 




NO. 


OF 


HRS: 


= 1 






EASTBOUNU 






WES TBOUND 








TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 






VPH 


SPEED 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.0U 




-1 






-1 


-1 



142 



SITE 2 

HARBOR FREEWAY 
AT 
146th AVE. P.O.C. 

DEPRESSED SECTION 



143 



HARBOR FREEWAY lffcTH AVE 
JULY 2b>1972 TO AUGUST 10*1972 

bearing: n oo oe>» b7'-E 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 

22 FT MEDIAN 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT = khk FT 

BOTTOM WIDTH OF CUT = 196 FT 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 1SH- FT 

DEPTH OF CUT = 22 FT 
SIDE SLOPES =2:i 

WIND MEASURED AT 10 METER HEIGHT (OR EQUIVALENT) 

METEOR. LOGICAL DATA 



DATE=7-2b-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=ll 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 


EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


200 


—1 


— 1 


2 


200 


-1 


-1 





-1 


■» j[ 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





20 


-1 


-1 






STAB. 



DATE=7-26-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 


EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


200 


-1 


-1 


2 


200 


-1 


-1 


2 


200 


-I 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 





200 


-1 


-1 






STAB. 



144 



PAGE 2 

HARBOR FREEWAY Q 146TH AVE 



DATE=7-2b-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=1! 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 


EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


200 


-1 


— 1 


2 


200 


-1 


-1 


2 


200 


-1 


*m J^ 


2 


200 


-1 


-1 


1 


20U 


-1 


-1 


1 


200 


-1 


^ 1 


1 


250 


-1 


-1 


4 


2hO 


-1 


^1 


U 


2^0 


^1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-I 



STAB. 



DATE=7-M-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=10 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STAB 


20 


-1 


-1 





-1 


200 


-1 


-1 





-1 


200 


-1 


-1 





-1 


200 


-1 


-1 





-1 


200 


260 


8 





B 


200 


240 


li 





C 


200 


260 


12 





C 


200 


2b0 


12 





C 


200 


240 


11 





C 


~1 


260 


9 


-1 


-3 



145 



PAGE i 

HARBOR FREEWAY Q 1<+6TH AVE 

DATE=b-*£-7£ STARTING HR= 700 NO. OP HRSrl 1 

WIND WIND SKY 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAR. 

£00 10<» 3 B 

£00 mo 4 B 

£0<» 170 6 B 

£00 170 10 C 

£0f. 160 ft B 

£00 160 10 B 

£00 170 9 B 

£01; 160 9 C 

£00 lbO ft B 

£00 lbO 6 C 

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

DATE=b-ft-7£ STARTING HR= ftOO NO. OF HRS=10 

WIND WIND SKY 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAB. 

£00 lftO SOB 

£00 £70 b 1 B 

£00 ££0 b R 

£00 £10 ft B 

£0 £bO 9 B 

£0(j £i+0 10 B 

£0 £bO 10 C 

£00 £i+0 HOC 

£0(. £bO 1£ D 

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 



146 



PAGE 4 

HARBOR FREEWAY to 146TH AVE 

DATE=6-9-72 STARTING HR= 800 NO. OF HRS=10 

SKY 
CEIL. COOE 

lb 
lb 

16 

20 M 

20 
200 
2<j0 
200 
200 
-1 

DATE=6-10-72 STARTING HR= 700 



CEIL. 

k oo 

200 

200 
200 

200 



WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


210 


b 


240 


b 


2 Mi 


6 


210 


6 


210 


6 


250 


7 


240 


6 


2bO 


6 


240 


6 


240 


6 


2 STARTING HR= 


WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


260 


2 


200 


5 


160 


3 


210 


b 


220 


7 



8 


D 


8 


D 


8 


D 


2 


A 





A 





8 





B 





B 





C 


-1 


-1 


NO. OF 


HRS= b 


SKY 




CODE 


STAB 





B 





B 





B 





B 


1 


B 



147 



CM 

® 









© ® ® 



c<o) re?) 



*>\ w 



® 



r^ 



^j 



© ©© © 

"O "CM V "ID 

co m t ro 



© 



© © © 




CO CM CD ^* 




CM «- 



ZZ = H 





LU 




LU 


tr 


ce: 


LU 


u_ 


CD 




z 


CD 


3 


3Q 


Z 


C£ 




<C 


Ui 


-T- 


CD 




O 


• 


tr 


oo 


0- 





>- 



GO 



LU 

< 

a 

•— « w 

CD O 

3= I- 






UJ 

h- 
o 

z 

LU 
O 

I 

© 



CD 



CD 



CD 



CD 



re 

UD 



1- 
O 



148 



m 



lO 



© 



^>J 



© ©<§) ® 

"o "CJ V ~io 
(O m t to 




@&&S®} — l 



O (O W 00 <t 
CVJ «■- — 



© 







-i ^ 




r 



E2 = H 



a: 

00 



CO 

o 
or 

0. 

co 

UJ 

i- 
o 

z 







>- 
<C 

S: >- 

UJ Q 

uj rs 

CC ! — 

U_ CO 

or zz: 

O CD 

P3 _ 

<c c_> 

rr uj 

CO 

co s: 






CD 

on \— 



LU 
_J 
< 
O 
CO 

o 

H 

H 
O 

2 



CD 



149 



HARBOR FREEWAY (3 146TH AVE 
JULY 25 f 1972 TO AUGUST 10 1 197? 

bearing: n on 06»57"E 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 

22 FT MEDIAN 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT = 284 FT 

BOTTOM WIDTH OF CUT = 196 FT 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 134 FT 

DEPTH OF CUT = 22 FT 
SIDE SLOPES =211 



POLLUTANT CONCENTRATION 



DATE=7-?5-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=1 1 

PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 IP 20 21 22 23 

6 9 14 -1 -1 14 18 16 19 16 28 25 -1 20 26 19 33 10 -I 8 11 11 4 

5 8 11 12 11 11 14 13 14 10 17 17 10 10 13 8 10 8 8 7 6 5 12 

2 3-1 9 3 8 8 5 6 5 8-1-1 6-1 47483-1 43 
22572784455-1-1424 4 33 3232 

■1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

•1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

■1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

32793885566-1 454553333-13 

338 10 49988 10 8 14 56467458343 

338 10 4 11 11 88R9 11 76467554444 

338 10 4 11 12 7889 10 56477544454 



DATE=7- 26-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2? 23 

6 6 12 13 13 12 16 14 16 19 19 22 19 22 23 19 27 10 9 8 7 14 8 

4 6 8 9 9 9 IP 10 10 11 12 12 

236666878689 

335767868689 

335787967789 

335666856778 



8 


8 


Q 


10 


11 


8 


7 


6 


6 


7 


4 


5 


6 


6 


7 


7 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


7 


7 


7 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


5 


6 


7 


6 


7 


4 


4 


4 


3 


5 


3 


4 


5 


6 


5 


6 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 



150 



PAGE 2 

HARBOR FREEWAY 146TH AVE 

DATE=7-28-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=11 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 It 15 16 17 18 IP 20 21 22 23 



8 


7 


14 


14 


14 


15 


17 


17 


17 


16 


22 


2? 


17 


22 


12 


24 


27 


1 1 


P 


8 


8 


14 


P 


7 


7 


12 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


14 


1? 


16 


17 


12 


13 


10 


15 


16 


10 


Q 


8 


8 


11 


Q 


5 


5 


P 


-1 


P 


10 


12 


P 


10 


8 


11 


12 


8 


P 


8 


10 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


8 


6 


4 


4 


8 


8 


8 


10 


10 


8 


8 


8 


10 


10 


7 


-1 


7 


8 


8 


6 


5 


5 


5 


7 


5 


4 


5 


8 


-1 


P 


11 


11 


8 


8 


8 


Q 


10 


7 


8 


7 


8 


Q 


6 


6 


6 


5 


8 


ft 


5 


5 


8 


-1 


-1 


10 


11 


8 


8 


7 


8 


P 


6 


7 


6 


7 


8 


6 


5 


5 


5 


6 


5 


4 


4 


8 


8 


8 


10 


1 1. 


6 


7 


6 


8 


8 


5 


6 


5 


5 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


4 


8 


8 


8 


Q 


10 


7 


7 


6 


P 


P 


5 


-1 


5 


6 


6 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


5 


3 


3 


8 


9 


P 


10 


13 


8 


7 


7 


10 


1 1 


6 


7 


6 


-1 


8 


6 


-1 


5 


-1 


4 


ft 


5 


5 


11 


12 


IP 


14 


15 


P 


1 1 


P 


13 


15 


7 


Q 


Q 


10 


11 


7 


7 


6 


6 


ft 


8 


3 


6 


8 


P 


8 


11 


13 


P 


Q 


P 


12 


12 


7 


7 


6 


P 


P 


7 


6 


ft 


4 


7 


4 



DATE=7-31-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=10 

PROBF NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1.1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1P 20 21 2? 23 

5 5 10 11 10 12 13 14 10 10 IP 20 -1 17 IP 22 24 10-1 7-1 8 5 
3 3 8 8111011 10 12 8 13 15 11 12 14 15 16 7 7 6 6 8 5 
4388 17 8PP98 10 11 7788877ft5ft4 
438811 810676885567754445 3 
3 3 6 7 8 8 8 5 6 5 7 8 4 5 5 6 6 4 6 3 3 4 3 
3367788554674555543 3 333 
23565884456645644 3 4333 3 
27768785646744 4 44 3 33 3 33 
■1 57878P5556-1 4458443-1-1 33 
359 15 P 12 14 8P7 10 12 8777854446^ 



151 



PAGE 3 

HARBOR FREEWAY Q l<+ftTH WE 



DATE=8-?-7? 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 



PRORE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 ft 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1R 19 20 21 2? 23 

7 11 14 14 15 14 17 16 Ifl 1ft 21 22 14 V6 16 10 21 12 9 R 7 5 5 

6 8 9 10 9 11 13 10 12 10 15 16 10 11 12 13 16 9 P 7 5 5 5 



5 


7 


8 


8 


8 


Q 


10 


8 


R 


8 


10 


12 


7 


R 


8 


8 


9 


7 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


8 


8 


8 


9 


Q 


8 


8 


8 


9 


Q 


7 


8 


8 


8 


R 


ft 


ft 


6 


5 


6 


5 


6 


7 


7 


7 


7 


8 


8 


6 


6 


ft 


8 


R 


6 


6 


ft 


8 


8 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


8 


8 


8 


ft 


8 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


8 


8 


8 


6 


5 


5 


'S 


ft 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


8 


8 


8 


6 


7 


7 


8 


8 


ft 


8 


8 


8 


Q 


5 


8 


8 


7 


<=> 


-1 


6 


ft 


6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


ft 


7 


7 


8 


-1 


ft 


ft 


7 


7 


7 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


8 


8 


8 


10 


1 1 


7 


R 


8 


8 


P 


7 


7 


ft 


7 


ft 


5 


5 


6 


7 


Q 


q 


10 


Q 


8 


9 


Q 


52 


1? 


7 


7 


9 


9 


10 


ft 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


4 


8 


6 


8 


8 


ft 


8 


6 


10 


10 


ft 


ft 


7 


8 


R 


4 


5 


3 


4 


4 


3 



DATE=8-8-72 



STARTING HRr 800 



NO. OF HRS=10 



PRORE NUMBERS 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 



3 - 

3 - 

3 - 

2 - 

3 - 
3 - 
3 - 

3 - 

4 - 
3 - 



8 8 11 



8 



3-1 8 -1 12 8 7 12 
3 3 8 9 9 9-1 8 
6 5111.21212 810 
44.13 9c»-Q7 6 



2 -1 



3 2-1 



u - 1 - 1 



4 5 



3 3 



3 3 3-1 



3 3 



5 


7 


6 


4 


4 


4 


4 


7 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


-1 


3 


3 


5 


-1 


u 


3 


4 


5 


5 


3 


4 


4 


4 


U 


-1 


4 


U 


a 


5 


5 


6 


6 


7 


ft 


8 


ft 


5 


6 


4 


7 


5 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


4 


5 


U 


5 


ft 


5 


7 


4 


4 


7 


7 


ft 


ft 


5 



152 



PAGE 4 

HARPOR FREEWAY 13 14ftTH AVE 



DATE=R-9-72 



STARTING HRr R00 



NO. OF HRS=10 



PROBE N UMBERS 
R 9 10 11 12 13 la 15 16 17 1R IP 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 



3 


3 


3 


3 


7 


7 


q 


1.0 


R 


5 


-1 


L 6 


,5 


s 


4 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


5 


5 


R 


R 


10 


fl 


R 


-1 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


a 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


4 


R 


R 


fl 


q 


7 


R 


-' 


I 5 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


a 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


R 


R 


R 


R 


7 


R 


-: 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


^ 


a 


3 


3 


5 


7 


R 


R 


R 


6 


7 


-i 


L 4 


u 


4 


3 


4 


a 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


4 


7 


7 


R 


7 


6 


6 


-; 


4 


4 


4 


3 


-1 


a 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


3 


-1 


7 


-1 


R 


R 


7 


7 


-: 


L 4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


a 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


U 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


R 


R 


q 


R 


7 


7 


-1 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


9 


R 


10 


q 


R 


fl 


-1 


5 


4 


4 


3 


4 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


11 


10 


10 


12 


7 


7 


-' 


ft 


6 


6 


5 


5 


"5 


4 


a 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


a 



DATE=«-10-72 STARTING HRr 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 



PPOBE NUMBERS 
q 10 11 12 13 14 1.5 16 17 18 iq 20 21 22 23 24 °5 2ft 



4 


4 


4 


5 


10 


11 


10 


15 


13 


14 


-1 


R 


R 


7 


R 


fl 


R 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


a 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


q 


10 


q 


14 


R 


10 


-1 


R 


7 


7 


6 


ft 


6 


6 


5 


6 


ft 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6 


5 


5 


7 


8 


R 


r 


14 


R 


R 


-1 


7 


R 


7 


7 


7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


5 


ft 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6 


7 


q 


-1 


9 


10 


R 


q 


-1 


6 


6 


6 


ft 


7 


7 


6 


-1 


ft 


5 


5 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


7 


6 


R 


R 


R 


q 


R 


R 


-1 


6 


ft 


ft 


ft 


7 


7 


6 


6 


5 


5 


6 


6 


5 


ft 


ft 



153 



HARBOR FREEWAY 19 1*6TH AVE 

JULY 25» 1972 TO AUGUST 10* 1972 

BEARING: N 00 06»57"E 

* LANES EACH DIRECTION 

22 FT MEDIAN 

TOP WIDTH OF CUT s 28* FT 

BOTTOM WIDTH OF CUT = 196 FT 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 13** FT 

DEPTH OF CUT = 22 FT 
SIDE SLOPES =2!1 

TRAFFIC DATA 



OArE=7-25-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO, OF HRS=11 





NOR THBOUND 




SOU !"HB OU 


ND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC» 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


6632 


• 18 


37 


*610 


.05 


70 


112*2 


51 


6352 


• 13 


*9 


2830 


• 03 


70 


9182 


56 


298* 


• 03 


70 


336* 


• 03 


70 


63*8 


70 


3198 


• 03 


70 


339* 


• 03 


70 


6592 


70 


3*1*+ 


• 0* 


70 


3828 


• 0* 


70 


72*2 


70 


*61* 


• 06 


70 


55*8 


• 06 


70 


10162 


70 


5292 


.07 


70 


61*6 


• 08 


70 


11*38 


70 


368* 


• 0* 


70 


7508 


• 10 


70 


11192 


70 


*61* 


• 06 


70 


55*8 


• 06 


70 


10162 


70 


5292 


.07 


70 


61*6 


• 08 


JO 


11*38 


70 


368* 


• 0* 


70 


7508 


• 10 


70 


11192 


70 



OATE=7-26-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC« 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


690* 


• 21 




33 


*502 


• 05 




70 


11*06 


*8 


6256 


• 09 




70 


2720 


.03 




70 


8976 


70 


*350 


• 05 




70 


2572 


• 03 




70 


6922 


70 


3*08 


• 0* 




70 


2875 


• 03 




70 


6283 


70 


3170 


• 03 




70 


3308 


• 03 




70 


6*78 


70 


2582 


• 03 




70 


3386 


• 03 




70 


5968 


70 



15* 



PAGE 2 

HARBOR FREEWAY 146TH AVE 





DATE=7- 


-28-72 




NORTHBOUND 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


6786 


• 20 


34 


6180 


.09 


70 


4412 


• 05 


70 


3524 


• 05 


70 


3258 


• 03 


70 


3470 


• 03 


70 


3192 


• 03 


70 


3324 


• 04 


70 


4733 


• 06 


70 


5120 


.07 


70 


3558 


.04 


70 



STARTING HR= TOO 



NO, OF HRS=11 



SOUTHBOUND 
VPH OCC. SPEED 



4494 


.05 


70 


2772 


• 03 


70 


2608 


.03 


70 


3060 


.03 


70 


3672 


• 04 


70 


3440 


• 03 


70 


3646 


.04 


70 


4250 


.05 


70 


5972 


.07 


70 


6524 


.09 


70 


7200 


• 10 


70 



TOTAL 


AV6. 


VPH 


SPEED 


11280 


49 


8952 


70 


7020 


70 


6584 


70 


6930 


70 


6910 


70 


6838 


70 


7574 


70 


10705 


70 


11644 


70 


10758 


70 



DATE=7-31-72 STARTING HRr 700 



NO. OF HRS=10 





NOR THBOUND 




SOUTHBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


6800 


• 22 


31 


4454 


• 05 


70 


11254 


47 


6082 


• 11 


56 


2618 


• 03 


70 


8700 


60 


4536 


• 05 


70 


2398 


• 03 


70 


6934 


70 


3476 


• 04 


70 


2770 


.03 


70 


6246 


70 


3052 


• 03 


70 


3310 


• 03 


70 


6362 


70 


2780 


• 03 


70 


3256 


• 03 


70 


6036 


70 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


4448 


• 06 


70 


5452 


.07 


70 


9900 


70 


5058 


.07 


70 


5810 


.07 


70 


10868 


70 



155 



PAGE 3 

HARBOR FREEWAY Q 146TH AVE 



DATE=8-2-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 





NORTHBOUND 




SOUTHBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


6854 


.17 


41 


4620 


• 05 


70 


11474 


53 


6024 


.11 


5b 


2770 


• 03 


70 


8794 


60 


4294 


• 05 


70 


2474 


• 03 


70 


6768 


70 


3602 


• 04 


70 


2764 


.03 


70 


6366 


70 


3226 


• 03 


70 


3130 


• 03 


70 


6356 


70 


2888 


• 03 


70 


3356 


• 03 


70 


6244 


70 


3052 


• 03 


70 


3288 


• 03 


70 


6340 


70 


3412 


• 04 


70 


4002 


.04 


70 


7414 


70 


4644 


• 06 


70 


5562 


• 06 


70 


10206 


70 


5204 


.07 


70 


6280 


• 08 


70 


11484 


70 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 



0ATE=8-8-72 



STARTING HR= 800 



NO. OF HRS=10 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


1 OCC. 


SPEED 


VPh 


1 OCC. 


SPEED 


yPH 


SPEED 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-x 


mm 1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




** 1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-J 


-1.00 




-1 


••j 


•1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


• 1 


-1.00 




-1 


-J 


«• 1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-] 


-1.00 




-1 


-] 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


m» 1 


-1.00 




-1 


am 1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




«1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-I 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-»1 


-J 


mm % 



156 



PAGE 4 

HARBOR FREEWAY fiD 146TH AVE 



DATE=8-9-72 



STAHTIN6 HR= BOO 



NO. OF HRS=10 





NORTHBOUNO 


« 


iOUTHHQU 


NO 


TOTAL 


avg. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO 


VPH 


SPEED 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1 


3212 


• 04 


70 


3246 


• 04 


70 


6458 


70 


2818 


• 03 


70 


3128 


• 03 


70 


5946 


70 


2932 


• 03 


70 


3190 


• 03 


70 


6122 


70 


3481 


• 04 


70 


4058 


• 04 


70 


7539 


70 


4648 


• 06 


70 


5590 


• 06 


70 


10238 


70 


5360 


.07 


70 


6432 


• 08 


70 


11792 


70 


3632 


• 04 


70 


7528 


• 10 


70 


11160 


70 



0ATE=8-10-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





N0RTH8OUN0 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


)/PH 


SPEEO 


7080 


• 14 




51 


4548 


• 05 




70 


11628 


59 


5946 


• 06 




70 


2622 


• 03 




70 


8568 


70 


4494 


,.05 




70 


2498 


• 03 




70 


6992 


70 


3568 


• 05 




70 


2830 


• 03 




70 


6398 


70 


3214 


• 03 




70 


3216 


• 03 




70 


6430 


70 



157 



SITE 3 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT WEIGH STATION 
AT-GRADE SECTION 



158 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 13 WEIGH STATION 
APRIL b»1972 TO AUGUST 17 * 1972 
REARING: N bO 2b»00"W 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
22 FT MEDIAN 
AT-GRADE SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 1*6 FT 

WIND MEASURED AT 10 METER HEIGHT (OR EQUIVALENT) 

METEORLOGICAL DATA 



DATE=4-b-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO, OF HRS= 7 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE, 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


2b0 


270 


3 


8 


C 


2b0 


2b0 


7 


4 


C 


250 


260 


6 


8 


C 


250 


260 


7 


b 


B 


180 


270 


8 


b 


B 


160 


270 


10 


6 


C 


140 


260 


11 


8 


D 



DATE=4-6-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


200 


260 


7 





C 


200 


500 


4 


2 


B 


20 't 


160 


4 


1 


B 


200 


260 


12 





C 


200 


270 


16 





D 


200 


260 


lb 





C 



159 



J J 



r» , i 



I 



•n 



(D © © 



© © © 



to 



V) 

o 

D 
< 



ll 

I 



© © & 



© © © 



o 
to 



o 

lO 



o 
to 



UJ 

t- 
o 

z 

UJ 



© 



£3 



UJ CO 



UJ 


I_U 

C£ 


_1 


CD 


U_ 


<c 




h^ 


2 


o 




13 


CD 


o 


Z 


LU 


r^i 




•— H 


i i 


UJ 


Q 


r^ 


CD 




O 


o 












QC 


<C 




0. 


CO 


> 



UJ 

-J 
< 
o 



a: o 



CD 
CD 



UJ 
CD 



CM 



CD 



I— 

CO 

nr 

CD 
i— a 

UJ 






160 



m 
ro' 






1" 






i 


. 


00 


^ 


"o 




^* 


S 


o 




u> 




■*■" 




to 








© 




I 


' 




1 1 


o 




"o 




oJ 




o 




of 




•*" 




K) 








© 




! 






, 


1 


in 




"o 




cJ 




o 




oT 




*"" 




f2s 




' 


f 


(*) 




1 





cd 
c_> >- 



CD 
CO 
O 



£3 

i— 
co 



UJ 



N^ 



OO 



CD 

CD 



J— 

CO 

=r: 

CD 
UJ 



UJ 

-J 
< 

o 

CO 

o 

I- 

I- 
o 



ro 



CD 



L6l 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY Q WEIGH STATION 

DATE=4-7-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 





WIND 


WIND 


SKr 




EIL. 


HIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


12 


150 


4 


b 


C 


200 


360 


3 


2 


8 


200 


300 


2 





B 


20 


260 


3 





B 


200 


180 


6 





B 


20 b 


260 


10 





8 


200 


2b0 


16 





D 



DATE=<+-10-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 

SKr 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAB, 

100 240 4 ft C 

200 160 3 ft C 

20 30 3 ft B 

200 360 2 ft B 

200 120 4 ft B 

lftO 190 12 ft C 

160 260 12 ft C 



WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


240 


4 


160 


3 


30 


3 


360 


2 


120 


4 


190 


12 


260 


12 


2 STARTING HR= 


WIND 


WIND 


DIRE. 


MPH 


30 


ft 


20 


5 


110 


4 


210 


4 


230 


a. 


260 


9 


270 


11 



DATE=4-l.l-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 

SKY 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAB. 

120 300 ft ft 

120 20 5 ft D 

120 110 4 ft C 

120 210 ^ 8 C 

120 230 ^ ft B 

120 260 9 ft C 

100 270 11 ft D 



162 



page 3 

san diego freeway id weigh station 

date=4-12-72 starting hr= 70f) no. of hrs= 4 

wind wino sky 

ceil. dire. mph code star. 

6b 20 4 5 C 

200 280 10 2 C 

20 ,.» 270 10 2 C 

200 260 15 2 C 

DATE =4- 15-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

WIND WIND SKY 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAR. 

200 280 17 D 

20'. ^70 19 n D 

200 270 13 1 C 

20'» 280 14 1 D 

200 280 lb C 

200 27 (j 16 C 

DATE =4- 14-7 2 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 





W I ND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


sta 


200 


230 


4 





8 


200 


240 


3 





B 


200 


l'-'O 


4 





R 


200 


180 


8 





8 


200 


20 


9 





B 


200 


260 


13 





C 


200 


260 


16 





C 



163 



PAGE t* 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 



DATE=b-ll- 


■7£ STARTING 


1 HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=ll 




WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


COOE 


STA 


9 


560 


5 


8 


D 


9 


£0 


5 


8 





£00 


100 


£ 


2 


8 


£00 


£00 


1 


2 


B 


£00 


£4-0 


6 


2 


A 


£00 


£70 


9 


2 


B 


£0 


£60 


15 


£ 


C 


10 


£60 


15 


5 


D 


£00 


£70 


14 


2 





£00 


£60 


14 


2 


D 


£00 


£60 


10 





C 



DATE=8-14-7£ 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


COOE 


STA 


5b 


£40 


4 


b 


C 


5b 


£70 


U 


5 


C 


£00 


£90 


b 


2 


B 


£00 


£bO 


b 


2 


B 


£00 


££() 


b 


2 


A 


£00 


£40 


7 


2 


B 



QATE=b-lb-7£ STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=1T 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


£00 


50 


4 


£ 


B 


£0'> 


7 


5 


2 


B 


£0 


3 70 


b 


2 


B 


£0 


lbO 


6 


b 


D 


£0 


17 


6 


2 


A 


£00 


lbO 


7 


2 


B 


£00 


1B0 


8 





B 


£00 


££0 


9 





C 


£0') 


£7 


lb 








£0i» 


£60 


lb 





D 


£00 


£60 


16 


2 


D 



164 



PAGE b 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 



DATE =8- 16-7 2 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=H 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


200 


300 


2 





R 


2100 


hO 


3 





R 


200 


100 


3 





R 


200 


170 


b 





R 


200 


160 


b 





A 


200 


160 


7 





R 


20'* 


260 


12 





C 


200 


270 


lb 








200 


260 


14 





D 


200 


270 


14 





D 


200 


2b0 


13 









DATE=8-17-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



MO. OF HRS=13 





WIND 


WIND 


SK/ 




EIL. 


DIRE 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


8 


130 


4 


b 


C 


200 


100 


4 





B 


200 


130 


4 





R 


200 


IbO 


7 





B 


20ii 


190 


8 





R 


200 


180 


7 





B 


200 


160 


8 





R 


200 


160 


11 





C 


200 


240 


12 





C 


200 


2b0 


14 





D 


200 


26 


12 


2 


D 



165 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY (3 WEIGH STATION 
APRIL 5»l<->72 TO AUGUST 17»1972 
BEARING! N 50 25»00"W 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
2? FT MEDIAN 
AT-GRADE SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 13R FT 

POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS 



DATE=4-5-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 7 



P R 


B E 


NUMBERS 


1 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 


1? 


13 14 


16 -1 -1 11 


9 


q q 


12 -I -1 R 


5 


5 6 


R -1 -1 -1 


5 


5 -1 


7-1-1 4 


4 


4 5 


6-1-1 4 


4 


4 5 


6-1-1 3 


3 


3 4 


5 -1 -1 3 



UATE=4-6-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



P R 


O B 


E 


N U 


M B 


E 


R S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




3 


3 


H 


6 


— \ 


— \ 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


-1 


5 




4 


5 


6 


-1 


-1 


-1 


5 




4 


a 


5 


6 


-1 


-1 


4 




-1 


-1 ■ 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 • 


-1 




4 


4 


a 


5 


-1 


-1 


3 





DATE=U-7-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 7 



PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

3 3 3 3 -1 -1 7 

3 3 3 3-1-1 4 
-1 2 3-1 -1 -1 4 

4 U -1 5-1-1. 6 
4 5 5 6-1-1 4 
4 4 5 6-1-1 3 
q. 4 5 5-1-1 3 



166 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREE-WAY WEIGH STATION 

DATE=4-10-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 

PPOBE NUMHERS 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

3 ^ 4 7 13 -1 3 

2 2.235-14 

3 3 3 3 5-15 

i+ 4 4 4 6 -1 6 

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

4 4 4 6 8 -1 3 
3 3 3 4 7-1 3 

DATE=4-l1-72 STARTING hp= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 



P R 


B 


E 


N 


U 


M B 


E R S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


3 


u 


5 


8 


-1 


5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 


-1 


6 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


4 


6 


12 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 ■ 


-1 


5 


8 


-1 


3 


1 


3 


7> 


3 


7 


-1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


-1 


I 



i)ATE=4-12-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 4 

PROBE NUMBERS 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

^13 3 4 7-12 

1 1 2 3 4-1 

2 2 2 4 5-10 



167 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 

DATE=4-13-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 



2 


3 


3 


4 


7 -1 


I 


2 


2 


3 


4 


5 -I 


-I 


2 


2 


3 


4 


6 -1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


4 


7 -1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


7 -1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 -1 


3 



DATE=4-14-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 7 

PROBE NUMBERS 
12 3 4 5 6 7 



4 


4 


5 


8 


12 


-1 


u 


2 


7> 


3 


4 


7 


-1 


2 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


-1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


-1 


2 



DATE=8-l1-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS=11 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

8 a 9 -1 10 13 3 4 3 -1 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 

7488109 3 343333 3 3 33 3 
554766789445-1 34 334 



4 


-1 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


8 


10 


6 


5 


6 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


6 


8 


10 


5 


6 


6 


4 


5 


5 


5 


-1 


IX 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


6 


7 


9 


5 


5 


5 


U 


4 


a 


4 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


U 


6 


9 


6 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


a 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


7 


9 


4 


5 


6 


4 


4 


5 


4 


a 


4 


3 


4 


5 


3 


5 


6 


3 


ft 


13 


5 


7 


8 


6 


6 


fy 


-1 


-1 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


5 


4 


5 


R 


12 


5 


6 


-1 


-1 


5 


6 


4 


4 


5 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


7 


11 


5 


6 


7 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 



168 



PAGE 4 

SAN niEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 



DATE=8-14-72 



STARTING HR= 70" 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ft 9 10 1112 1314 15 16 17 18 



3 



3 



4 9 10 16 8 



R 



7 6 



4 


4 


3 


4 


5 


5 


7 


Q 


13 


6 


6 


5 


4 


5 


5 


4 


6 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 


6 


6 


6 


7 


8 


5 


4 


'4 


4 


'4 


a 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


5 


4 


6 


7 


q 


4 


4 


5 


a 


a 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


6 


6 


7 


8 


5 


P5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


a 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


8 


8 


6 


6 


5 


4 


4 


a 


3 


a 


a 



DATE=8-15-72 STARTING HR= 70n 



NO. OF HRS=11 



2 3 



PROBE NUMBERS 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 la IS 16 17 1« 



10 -1 14 12 13 15 



7 « 



8 



7 



7 



6 


-1 


7 


6 


9 


8 


3 


4 


4 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


-1 


4 


5 


4 


u 


6 


6 


3 


5 


7 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


7 


8 


4 


4 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


? 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


7 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


^ 


"5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


a 


4 


5 


8 


-1 


-1 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


8 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


10 


-1 


-1 


6 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


Q 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


10 


-1 


-1 


6 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


3 



DATE=8-16-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS-1 1 



PROBE 
5 6 7 8 



N U M B E R S 
9 10 1.1. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 



8 10 10 
6 6 6 

5 

a 






14 15 
8 8 



8 
4 
4 
5 

4 

4 



5 

4 
3 
3 
2 
? 



5 
5 
4 
3 
3 
3 



4 
3 

3 
3 
1 

2 



-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 

-1 2-1-1 2 -1 -1 6-1-1 3 -1 -1 3 -1 -1 2 

-1 2-1-1 2 -1 -1 8-1-1 4 -1 -1 3 -1 -1 3 

-1 2-1-1 2 -1 -1 a -1 -1 5 -1 -1 3 -1 -1 3 

-1 2-1-1 2 -1 -1 8-1-1 5 -1 -1 3 -1 -1 3 



169 



PAGF 5 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 13 WEIGH STATION 

DATE=8-17-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 



PROBE NUMBERS 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11. 12 13 1U 15 16 17 18 



8 -1 10 -1 5 -1 



3 3 -1 



5 


5 


6 


4 


5 


8 


4 


5 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


3 


a 


5 


3 


-1 


5 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


U 


U 


■5 


4 


3 


3 


5 


3 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


-1 


3 


4 


7 


4 


4 


7 


4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


6 


^■ 


4 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


1. 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-l 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


8 


-l 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


4 


1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


10 


-l 


-1 


6 


-1 


-1 


5 


-1 


-1 


4 


1 


-1 


■^ 


-1 


-1 


3 


-1 


-1 


10 


-l 


-i 


7 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


4 


1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


2 


-1 


-1 


Q 


-l 


-1 


6 


-1 


-1 


4 


-1 


-1 


4 



170 



SAN OIEGO FREE WAT WEIGH STATION 
APRIL 5*1972 TO AUGUST 17U972 
BEARING! N SO 25»00"W 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
22 FT MEDIAN 
AT-GRAUE SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY S 138 FT 

TRAFFIC DATA 

* S DERIVED DATA 



0ATE=4-5-72 

NORTHBOUND 
VPH OCC. SPEED* 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HHS= 7 



6939 


-1.00 


45 


6222 


-1.00 


45 


4957 


-1.00 


45 


4592 


-1.00 


60 


4299 


-1.00 


60 


4225 


-1.00 


60 


4239 


-1.00 


60 




0ATE=4- 


-6-72 





SOU fHBOUND 




VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


6489 


-1.00 




45 


4892 


-1.00 




45 


4075 


-1.00 




60 


3926 


-1.00 




60 


4040 


-1.00 




60 


3712 


-1.00 




60 


4249 


-1.00 




60 



TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


SPEED* 


13428 


45 


11114 


45 


9032 


52 


8518 


60 


8339 


60 


7937 


60 


8488 


60 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO* 


ypH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


6939 


-1.00 




45 


6489 


-1.00 




45 


13428 


45 


6222 


-1.00 




45 


4892 


-1.00 




45 


11114 


45 


4957 


-1.00 




45 


4075 


-1.00 




60 


9032 


52 


4592 


-1.00 




60 


3926 


-1.00 




60 


8518 


60 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


4225 


-1.00 




60 


3712 


-1.00 




60 


7937 


60 



171 



PAGE 2 

SAN 0IE60 FREEWAY Q WEIGH STATION 



DATE=4-7-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 7 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7083 


-1.00 




45 


6835 


-1.00 




45 


13918 


45 


6613 


-1.00 




45 


5217 


-1.00 




45 


11830 


45 


5113 


-1.00 




45 


4133 


-1.00 




60 


9246 


52 


4580 


-1.00 




60 


3917 


-1.00 




60 


8497 


60 


4469 


-1.00 




60 


3978 


-1.00 




60 


8447 


60 


4212 


-1.00 




60 


3675 


-1.00 




60 


7887 


60 


4124 


-1.00 




60 


4194 


-1.00 




60 


8318 


60 



OATE=4-10-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 7 





NORTHBOU 


NO 




SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


6939 


-1.00 


45 


6489 


-1.00 




45 


13428 


45 


6222 


-1.00 


45 


4892 


-1.00 




45 


11114 


45 


4957 


-1.00 


45 


4075 


-1.00 




60 


9032 


52 


4592 


-1.00 


60 


3926 


-1.00 




60 


8518 


60 


-1 


-1.00 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


4225 


-1.00 


60 


3712 


-1.00 




60 


7937 


60 


4239 


-1.00 


60 


4249 


-1.00 




60 


8488 


60 



DATE=4-ll-72 STARTING HH^ 700 



NO. OF HRS= 7 





NOR THBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7083 


-1.00 




45 


6835 


-1.00 




45 


13918 


45 


6613 


-1.00 




45 


5217 


-1.00 




45 


11830 


45 


5113 


-1.00 




45 


4133 


-1.00 




60 


9246 


52 


4580 


-1.00 




60 


3917 


-1.00 




60 


8497 


60 


4469 


-1.00 




60 


3978 


-1.00 




60 


8447 


60 


4212 


-1.00 




60 


3675 


-1.00 




60 


7887 


60 


4124 


-1.00 




60 


4194 


-1.00 




60 


8318 


60 



172 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 



DATE=4-12-72 STARTING HR= 70U 



NO. OF HRSS 4 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


6613 


-1.00 




45 


5217 


-1.00 




45 


11830 


45 


5113 


-1.00 




45 


4133 


-1.00 




60 


9246 


52 


4580 


-1.00 




60 


3917 


-1.00 




60 


8497 


60 



DATE=4-13-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 




y/PH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


7083 


-1.00 




45 


6613 


-1.00 




45 


5113 


-1.00 




45 


4580 


-1.00 




60 


4469 


-1.00 




60 


4212 


-1.00 




60 





SOUTHBOUND 




VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


6835 


-1.00 




45 


5217 


-1.00 




45 


4133 


-1.00 




60 


3917 


-1.00 




60 


3978 


-1.00 




60 


3675 


-1.00 




60 



TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


SPEEO* 


13918 


45 


11830 


45 


9246 


52 


8497 


60 


8447 


60 


7887 


60 



UATE=4-14-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OR HRS= 7 





NOR THBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7083 


-1.00 




45 


6835 


-1.00 




45 


13918 


45 


6613 


-1.00 




45 


5217 


-1.00 




45 


11830 


45 


5113 


-1.00 




45 


4133 


-1.00 




60 


9246 


52 


4580 


-1.00 




60 


3917 


-1.00 




60 


8497 


60 


4469 


-1.00 




60 


3978 


-1.00 




60 


8447 


60 


4212 


-1.00 




60 


3675 


-1.00 




60 


78fl7 


60 


4124 


-1.00 




60 


4194 


-1.0U 




60 


8318 


60 



173 



PAGE 4 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY B WEIGH STATION 



DATE=8-ll-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 





NORTHBOUND 




SOUTHBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


6972 


-1.00 


45 


6007 


-1.00 


45 


12979 


45 


6837 


-1.00 


45 


4690 


-1.00 


60 


11527 


51 


5966 


-l.po 


45 


4420 


-1.00 


60 


10386 


51 


5810 


-1.00 


45 


5042 


-1.00 


45 


10852 


45 


5758 


-1.00 


45 


5416 


-1.00 


45 


11174 


45 


5395 


-1.00 


45 


5426 


-1.00 


45 


10821 


45 


5478 


-1.00 


45 


5468 


-1.00 


45 


10946 


45 


6121 


-1.00 


45 


6121 


-1.00 


45 


12242 


45 


6920 


-1.00 


45 


5841 


-1.00 


45 


12761 


45 


7325 


-1.00 


45 


5478 


-1.00 


45 


12803 


45 


6430 


-1.00 


45 


5748 


-1,00 


45 


12178 


45 



DATES8-14-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


\fPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7584 


-1.00 




45 


6080 


-1.00 




45 


13664 


45 


6796 


-1.00 




45 


4835 


-1.00 




45 


11631 


45 


6215 


-1.00 




45 


4420 


-1.00 




60 


10635 


51 


5841 


-1.00 




45 


4814 


-1.00 




45 


10655 


45 


5416 


-1.00 




45 


5053 


-1.00 




45 


10469 


45 


4928 


-1.00 




45 


4835 


-1.00 




45 


9763 


45 



DATE=B»15~72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7501 


-1.00 




45 


6059 


-1.00 




45 


13560 


45 


6785 


-1.00 




45 


4804 


-1.00 




45 


11589 


45 


6069 


-1.00 




45 


4399 


-1.00 




60 


10468 


51 


5654 


-1.00 




45 


4949 


-1.00 




46 


10603 


45 


5312 


-1.00 




45 


5001 


-1.00 




45 


10313 


45 


4918 


-1.00 




45 


4897 


-1.00 




45 


9815 


45 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


•» 1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 



174 






PAGE 5 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY WEIGH STATION 



DATE=8-l6-72 STARTING HH= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 





NOR TH80UND 




VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


6982 


-1.00 




45 


6267 


-1.00 




45 


61,37 


-1.00 




45 


5758 


-1.00 




45 


5312 


-1.00 




45 


4648 


-1.00 




60 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


mm \ 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




m» ^ 


-1 


-1.00 




*m \ 





SOUTHBOUND 




VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


6049 


-1.00 




45 


4814 


-1.0U 




45 


4762 


-1.00 




45 


5063 


-1.00 




45 


5074 


-1.00 




45 


4939 


-1.00 




45 


-1 


-1.00 




on J 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 



TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


SPEED* 


13031 


45 


11081 


45 


10899 


45 


10821 


45 


10386 


45 


9587 


52 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 



OAlE=8-17-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HKS=11 





NOR THBOUNO 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED* 


VPH 


SPEED* 


7128 


-1.00 




45 


5997 


-1.00 




45 


13125 


45 


6516 


-1.00 




45 


4472 


-1.00 




60 


10988 


51 


5966 


-1.00 




45 


4596 


-1.00 




60 


10562 


52 


5758 


-1.00 




45 


5032 


-1.00 




45 


10790 


45 


5446 


-1.00 




45 


5250 


-1.00 




45 


10696 


45 


4762 


-1.00 




45 


4876 


-1.0U 




45 


9638 


45 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




mm 1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1.00 




-1 


-1 


-1 



175 



SITE 4 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT NATIONAL BLVD. 
AT-GRADE SECTION 






176 



f*>l 



I 



o 
o 



®(D©E 



©0© 
"c\j "oo V 

© 



o 

o 



"8 



to 



00 



or 

UJ 
CD 

5 
r? 
z 

UJ 
CO 

o 
cc 

0. 

to 

UJ 

t- 
o 

z 

UJ 



© 



o 

CVJ 



>- 


>- 




<c 


q 




^g 


=3 




UJ 


\— 




LU 


CO 




O^ 






U_ 


I 




CD 


1— 




CD 


T7^ 




UJ 


CD 


^— x 


•— — t 


INI 


UJ 


^ 




_J 




OC 


< 


^** 


■Z2 


o 


<C 


rn 


CO 


CO 








- 


o 


■\ 


Q 


h- 


T^ 


> 




CD 


i 


h- 


•— • 


CQ 


o 


I— 






<C 


1 


«_> 


LJ> 


^ 




CD 






—J 


O 




LlJ 


h- 




CQ 


<c 




CD 






OC 






Q_ 


I— 




•=r 






r^ 







o 

ID 



CD 










177 



3DN3i M/d@ 



II 



©©©© © 

"O ~tD "(VI "CO "«J" 

eg -^ 

33N3J M/u(^J 



i 



© 



il 



o 



to 



00 



o 

CM 



O 

in 



CO 

2 

3 
Z 

UJ 
CD 
O 
CC 

a 
</) 

Ul 
O 

z 

UJ 







>- 


>- 




<c 


Q 




^ 


^3 




UJ 


1— 




UJ 


CO 




Qi 






U_ 


o 




CD 


—4 




t£> 


I— 




UJ 


<-J> 


y-% 


i-^ 


UJ 


UJ 


Q 


CO 


_J 




1 


< 


H3 


~^ 


o 


<c 


1— • 


</> 


CO 








• 


C 


■\ 


Q 


H 


SE 


> 




CD 


1 


1- 


H— I 


CQ 


O 


h- 




3 


<c 


1 


>-> 


c_> 


<C 




CD 






— 1 


CD 
i— i 




UJ 


J— 




CQ 


<C 




CD 


22E 




Q£ 






a_ 


I— 




Lfi 






(^ 







'JD 






178 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 19 NATIONAL BLVD. 
AUGUST 22>1972 TO SEPTEMBER 11 > 1972 
BEARING: N 33 19'31 W W 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
22 FT MEDIAN 
AT-GRADE SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAYS 138 FT 

POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS 



DATE=8-22-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

17 15 16 18 -1 19 22 31 33 34 -1 -1 24 -1 27 27 29 23 -1 

14 14 15 16 -1 17 19 26 28 29 36 37 21 26 32 30 30 29 -1 

11 9 11 8 -1 13 14 14 18 17 21 24 16 18 19 20 20 19 -1 

5 3 4 4 5 6 7 7 8 8 11 12 9 11 12 13 14 13 -1 

3 2 3 2 3 3 4 5 6 5 8 10 8 9 9111110-1 

31 3332334478688998-1 



DATE=8-23-72 



STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



14 19 20 22 23 25 26 19 21 22 23 25 13 14 15 16 17 15 - 
13 20 20 22 24 26 28 19 18 21 23 26 14 12 13 14 14 12 - 



6 11 14 12 -1 15 16 15 18 20 21 21 
5-1 6 8 7 8 9 10 10 14 14 16 
44565677879 12 
43343455688 10 



9 9 10 11 12 9 - 

9 9 10 11 12 10 - 

9 10 10 13 14 13 - 

8 9 9 10 11 10 - 



DATE=8-24-72 STARTING HR^ 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



6 13 9 11 13 14 15 8 9 11 13 14 



7 13 9 10 -1 14 15 

3 7 8 7 8 10 11 

3 3 3 3 4 4 6 

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 



7 8 9 11 13 
9 10 12 13 14 

8 8 10 11 13 
5 6 7 8 9 
5 5 7 8 9 



179 



2 2 3 3 3 3 3 

4 3 3 3 4 5 4 

4 5 6 7 8 5 3 

9 10 11 12 13 13 6 

8 8 10 11 13 12 7 

8 8 9 10 11 11 6 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY NATIONAL BLVD. 

DATE=8-25-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HKS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



6 13 11 13 14 15 17 8 9 



9 14 



5 6 



5 


10 


8 


9 


9 


11 


12 


9 


11 


14 


14 


17 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


5 


9 


8 


9 


8 


11 


-1 


9 


9 


13 


12 


14 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


12 


8 


10 


11 


13 


14 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 


5 


3 


3 


7 


7 


8 


9 


9 


11 


9 


10 


12 


12 


14 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


8 


8 


9 


-1 


13 


7 


7 


9 


8 


11 


10 


4 



DATE=8-28-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



6 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


6 


6 


6 


8 


8 12 


8 


5 


4 


4 


5 


6 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


7 8 


8 


5 


6 


4 


3 


3 


4 


5 


5 


5 


7 


8 9 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 9 


9 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


5 


6 


7 


11 10 


8 



9 10 11 12 11 - 

8 9 11 11 10 - 

8 9 11 11 10 - 

8 9 11 12 11 - 

8 10 11 13 14 13 - 

8 9 12 14 20 10 12 14 15 16 14 - 



OATE=8-29-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 



PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



14 


16 


19 


20 


21 


23 


22 


19 


19 


19 


22 


22 


11 


12 


14 


14 


14 


13 


-1 


14 


15 


17 


18 


-1 


21 


20 


22 


22 


25 


26 


24 


18 


19 


18 


19 


21 


20 


-1 


12 


10 


13 


12 


14 


15 


14 


15 


18 


22 


22 


21 


22 


22 


22 


22 


24 


22 


-I 


8 


6 


5 


6 


5 


8 


9 


10 


11 


15 


14 


15 


12 


14 


14 


15 


15 


15 


-1 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


7 


8 


8 


8 


10 


12 


12 


12 


12 


14 


15 


14 


-1 


5 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


7 


6 


6 


8 


9 


11 


11 


11 


11 


12 


13 


13 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


10 


11 


11 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


5 


5 


6 


7 


9 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


10 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


5 


6 


8 


9 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


6 


6 


8 


10 


13 


8 


10 


11 


13 


14 


13 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


5 


7 


6 


6 


6 


9 


11 


9 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


-1 



180 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FHEEWAY NATIONAL BLVD. 



DATE=9-6-72 



STARTING HR= 800 



NO, OF HRS= 5 



PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

4 8 17 IB 17 14 16 19 7 7 7 6 4 3 4 
3 3 5 3 3 10 11 12 10 11 13 12 8 6 5 
3 3 4 3 3 6 8 9 10 11 12 11 8 6-1 
3 3 3 3 3 9 12 15 10 11 13 11 8 6 5 
3343389 11 8899654 



DATE=9-ll-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

7 4 5 4 5 12 14 12 14 15 16 15 10 8 6 
4 4 5 4 4 12 17 21 12 14 14 14 9 6 6 
3 3 5 5 4 8 9 11 11 11 12 11 7 5 4 
333336788898543 
33333 5 678999664 
333334687888543 



181 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY Q NATIONAL BLVD. 
AUGUST 22 » 1972 TO SEPTEMBER 11 > 1972 
BEARING: N 33 19» 31" W 

4 LANES EACH DIRECTION 
22 FT MEDIAN 
AT-GRADE SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 138 FT 

TRAFFIC DATA 

DATE=8-22-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG* 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7564 


• 16 




43 


7460 


• 26 




27 


15024 


35 


6940 


• 20 




35 


6780 


• 13 




53 


13720 


44 


6894 


• 18 




39 


6238 


• 10 




63 


13132 


50 


0792 


• 15 




46 


6448 


• 11 




59 


13240 


52 


6610 


• 13 




51 


6914 


• 12 




58 


13524 


55 


6246 


• 12 




53 


6286 


• 10 




64 


12532 


58 



UATE28-23-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7082 


• 18 




40 


7443 


• 20 




38 


14525 


39 


7432 


• 16 




42 


6941 


• 18 




39 


14373 


40 


6886 


• 13 




54 


6241 


.09 




70 


13127 


61 


6274 


• 13 




49 


6641 


.14 




48 


12915 


48 


6674 


• 13 




52 


6796 


• 11 




63 


13470 


57 


6382 


• 10 




65 


6223 


• 10 




63 


126U5 


64 



DATE=8-24-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7680 


• 15 




52 


5718 


.19 




30 


13398 


43 


7236 


.15 




49 


5083 


• 16 




29 


12319 


40 


6626 


• 12 




58 


4726 


• OV 




53 


11552 


56 


6527 


• 12 




5^ 


5143 


• 11 




47 


11670 


52 


6/62 


• 13 




50 


5146 


• 10 




52 


11906 


52 


6814 


• 13 




53 


4 761 


.09 




54 


11575 


53 



182 



PA6E 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY NATIONAL BLVD. 



DATE=J-25-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC, 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7198 


.1*4 




52 


7781 


.15 




53 


14979 


52 


72m 


• 13 




56 


6362 


.09 




70 


13576 


63 


6776 


• 11 




62 


6210 


.09 




70 


12986 


66 


666b 


• 11 




61 


6529 


• 10 




66 


13195 


64 


7050 


• 15 




46 


7097 


.11 




65 


14147 


56 


7152 


• 16 




45 


6613 


• 10 




67 


13765 


56 



DATE=8-28-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


6824 


• 12 




58 


6285 


• 09 




70 


13109 


64 


6662 


.10 




bf 


6160 


.09 




69 


12822 


68 


6920 


• 12 




58 


6857 


• 11 




63 


13777 


61 


7156 


.15 




48 


7192 


.13 




56 


14348 


52 


7276 


.13 




57 


7353 


.17 




44 


14629 


50 


6994 


• 11 




64 


6502 


.14 




47 


13496 


56 



DATE=8-29-72 STARTING HK= 700 



NO. OF HRS=11 





NOR THBOUND 




SOUTHBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7354 


• 18 


41 


7629 


.19 


41 


14983 


41 


7344 


.18 


41 


6651 


.15 


45 


13995 


43 


7056 


• 13 


55 


6220 


• 08 


70 


13278 


62 


6198 


• 13 


48 


6485 


• 10 


66 


12683 


57 


6676 


.14 


48 


6 764 


• 10 


68 


13440 


58 


6706 


.11 


62 


6181 


.09 


70 


12887 


65 


6562 


.10 


66 


6013 


.09 


68 


12575 


67 


6932 


• 11 


64 


6836 


.10 


69 


13768 


66 


7448 


• 15 


50 


7380 


.11 


68 


14828 


59 


7094 


• 12 


60 


7328 


• 12 


62 


14422 


61 


6582 


22 


30 


7X228 


.11 


67 


13810 


49 



183 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY Q NATIONAL BLVD. 



DATE=9-6-72 



STARTING HR= 800 



NO. OF HRS= b 





NORTHBOUNO 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


7414 


• 16 




47 


70b2 


• 20 




36 


14466 


41 


7006 


• 12 




b9 


6344 


.10 




64 


133b0 


62 


6824 


.12 




b8 


b990 


• 20 




30 


12814 


4b 


6632 


.13 




b2 


60bb 


.31 




20 


12687 


36 


6bl4 


• 11 




60 


6113 


.09 




69 


12627 


64 



DATE=9-ll-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG, 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8180 


.16 




b2 


7787 


• 16 




49 


lb967 


bl 


7260 


.13 




b7 


6997 


• 20 




3b 


142b7 


46 


7012 


.13 




bb 


60U0 


.08 




70 


13012 


62 


6448 


.11 




b9 


b634 


• 08 




70 


12082 


64 


6430 


• 11 




b9 


61b0 


.09 




69 


12bB0 


64 


6146 


.16 




39 


b824 


• 08 




70 


11970 


b4 



184 



SITE 5 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
AT 122nd AVE. 
FILL SECTION 



185 



I 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 
SEPTEMBER kbtl^fk TO OCTOBER lkfl97k 

b LANES NORTHBOUND— -^ LANES SOUTHBOUND 
?.k FT MEDIAN 

lb FT FILL SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = lbO FT 

SIDE SLOPES = l.bll 

WIND MEASURED AT 10 METER HEIGHT (OR EQUIVALENT) 

METEORLOGICAL DATA 

DATE=9-20-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= b 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


201) 


3£0 


3 





C 


koo 


40 


3 





B 


kbb 


hb 


3 





R 


kbb 


kbb 


7 





B 


kbb 


kbb 


9 





C 



DATE=9-£l-7k STARTING HR= 700 NO. OP HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


kbb 


30 


3 


I 


C 


kbb 


bO 


3 


4 


B 


kbb 


60 


3 


4 


B 


kbb 


kbb 


b 


4 


B 


kbb 


kbb 


9 


*+ 


C 


kbb 


kbb 


10 


u 


C 



DATE=9-22-7k STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

WIND WIND SKY 

CEIL. DIRE. MPH CODE STAB. 

kbb 100 3 7 C 

kbb Ikb 4 7 C 

kbO 170 <+ 7 C 

kbb kbb 7 "> C 

kbO £40 b 7 C 

2b0 240 b b B 

186 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 

DATE=9-2b-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


sky 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


40 


1)0 


3 


b 


C 


40 


120 


3 


b 


C 


40 


120 


3 


b 


C 


2ft 


240 


b 


b 


D 


200 


230 


b 


2 


B 


20«> 


220 


10 


2 


C 



DATE=9-26-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


200 


260 


6 


2 


8 


200 


2b0 


9 


2 


C 


200 


2bO 


10 





C 


200 


270 


11 





D 


200 


260 


12 





D 


20 


260 


12 





E 



DATE=9-27-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


23 


40 


7 


5 


D 


2b0 


HU 


9 


4 


C 


2bO 


90 


11. 


7 


D 


2bO 


230 


11 


6 


D 


2bO 


230 


10 


ft 


D 


2bO 


220 


10 


b 


D 



187 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY Q 122ND AVE 



DATE=9-26-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



CEIL. 

2b0 
200 
200 
20 
200 
160 



WIND 
DIRE, 

2b0 
240 
240 
240 
240 
2b0 



WIND 
MPH 

10 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 



SKY 
CODE 

5 
2 
2 
1 
1 
5 



STA8. 

C 
C 
C 
D 
C 
D 



DATE-lO-*2-?2 



STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OF HRS= 4 



CEIL. 

200 
20U 
20 u 
200 



WIND 
DIRE. 

20ft 
210 
220 
220 



WIND 
MPH 

13 
13 
10 

6 



SKY 
CODE 

2 
2 
2 

2 



STAB. 

C 
C 
C 
C 



DATE=10-3-72 



STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

9b 

9b 

100 

20 

-1 



WIND 
DIRE. 

2b0 
260 
2b0 
260 
-1 



WIND 
MPH 

9 
9 
9 
ft 
-1 



SKY 
CODE 

ft 
b 
5 
2 
-1 



STAB. 

D 
C 
D 
C 
-1 



DATE=10-4-72 STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OF HRS= 5 



CEIL. 

200 
20'/ 
200 
20 
200 



WIND 
DIRE. 

260 
240 
230 
230 
240 



WIND 
MPH 

13 
14 
13 
13 

10 



SKY 
CODE 









STAB. 

C 
D 
D 
D 
E 



188 



PAGE *f 

SAN DIEGO PREEWAY (3 122ND AVE 



DATE=10-b-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



CEIL. 

2b0 
2b0 
2b 
2b0 
2b0 
2b0 



WIND 
DIRE. 

hb 
2b0 
240 
240 
270 
2b0 



WIND 
MPH 

5 
7 
9 
10 
7 
4 



SKY 
CODE 

7 

7 
7 
ft 
7 
7 



STAB. 

C 
C 
C 
D 
D 
F 



DATE=10-6-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

200 
200 
2b0 
2b0 
2b0 



WIND 
DIRE. 

140 
160 
110 
120 
130 



WIND 
MPH 

?> 
3 
2 
4 



SKY 
CODE 

2 
2 
b 
b 
b 



STAB. 

F 
B 
B 
B 
B 



DATE=10-10-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= b 



CEIL. 

120 
120 
200 
20 
200 



WIND 
DIRE. 

210 
230 
230 
210 
210 



WIND 
MPH 

6 
7 
12 
9 
9 



SKY 
CODE 

ft 
8 
b 
2 
2 



STAB. 

D 
D 
C 
C 
C 



DATE=10-ll-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



CEIL. 

2b0 
2b0 
2b0 
200 
2b0 
2b0 



WIND 
DIRE. 

240 
2b0 
24-0 
260 
2b0 
2b0 



WIND 


MPH 


8 


9 


10 


12 


13 


13 


189 



SKY 
CODE 

4 
4 
4 

1 
4 
4 



STAB. 

B 
C 
C 
D 
D 
D 



PAGE b 

SAN DIEGO FREF.WAY Q IkkND AVE 

DATE=10-l>-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OP HRS= 6 





WIND 


WIND 


SKY 




EIL. 


DIRE. 


MPH 


CODE 


STA 


1 


30 


4 


b 


F 


90 


7 


3 


b 


C 


90 


90 


3 


b 


C 


90 


f>0 


3 


8 


c 


90 


100 


4 


ft 


c 


90 


130 


b 


ft 


D 



190 



<^J 




hi 

CD 

Z 

UJ 
CD 
O 

<r 
o. 

w 

UJ 

h- 
o 







>- 

UJ >- 
UJ (=J 



CD 



CO 
CO 



CD 

CD 



UJ 
CD 
CL. 



UD 



CO 



1^] 

en 



Q 

csi 

CSJ 



UJ 

< 
o 

o 

I- 




®©@®© 



^<D~® — ©0® ©© 



i J 
§ 8 



®©0®© 
j i i i i 

O "<o C\J "co V 






ro 

C\J 







cc 

LU 
CD 

2E 

3 



UJ 

m 
o 
or 
a. 

en 



o 

z 



I 





on 



CD 



>- 



CO 



C=J I— 
CD 
UJ 
CO 

I 



CO 

CO 



CD 



23 
CD 






CJD 



LU 

> 

Q 
CM 



LU 

_J 
< 
O 
CO 

o 
o 



192 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 
SEPTEMBER 20»1972 TO OCTOBER 12>1972 
BEARING: N 10 32'09"E 

5 LANES NORTHBOUND — 4 LANES SOUGHBOUND 
22 FT MEDIAN 

15 FT FILL SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 150 FT 

SIDE SLOPES = 1.5:i 

POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS 

DATE=9-20-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 5 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 



15 


14 


14 


14 


15 


16 


18 


21 


22 


23 


25 


26 


20 


22 


23 


24 


25 


15 


14 


21 


18 


13 


14 


17 


19 


-1 


IP 


2? 


-1 


20 


21 


23 


23 


14 


13 


14 


14 


15 


15 


14 


12 


1.3 


12 


13 


14 


14 


17 


24 


16 


14 


14 


15 


16 


17 


10 





20 


21 


10 


11 


10 


q 


11 


8 


8 


9 


10 


10 


q 


10 


12 


13 


15 


14 


17 


13 


11 


11 


12 


10 


11 


10 


11 


9 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


11 


11 


8 


10 


10 


8 


7 


6 


11 


8 



■ DATE=9-21-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

24 22 23 24 24 26 26 24 27 29 29 30 22 24 24 25 26 19 16 19 14 

23 22 24 26 21 24 29 -1 27 26 31 31 21 20 22 19 22 22 2? 20 21 

13 14 16 17 17 18 IP 17 19 20 22 22 14 15 13 12 14 16 14 13 13 

9 13 12 12 11 12 14 14 14 15 17 17 in 12 10 12 11 13 10 9 8 

6 5 5 6 5 5 5 7 8 91011 ^ l 1 9 1011 7 610 8 

6655656678PP7888 11 6 5 P 7 



DATE=9-22-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 q 10 11 12 1.3 14 15 16 17 1 8 19 20 21 

20 20 24 25 25 27 28 21 22 ?5 26 28 17 iq IP 19 21 18 17 10 15 

16 18 21 22 -1 20 24 -1 25 22 ?8 28 15 14 16 14 16 18 17 14 16 



8 


10 


13 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IP 


in 


10 


11 


q 


12 


12 


11 


q 


8 


5 


7 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


8 


10 


q 


12 


12 


8 


8 


q 


10 


12 


8 


8 


10 


8 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


U 


5 


6 


6 


8 


8 


q 


8 


8 


q 


q 


11 


3 


3 


8 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


-1 


5 


6 


8 


q 


10 


12 


13 


8 


q 


q 


10 


12 


6 


6 


8 


6 



193 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 

DATE=9-25-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1R 1Q 20 21 

12 14 16 17 18 21 21 IP 21 ?2 22 24 14 10 14 14 16 14 13 7 8 
10 -1 12 14 16 18 17 -1 18 15 21 21 

3 5 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 91111 

33343-14778-19 

333333344578 

33 3 2-12 3-14688 

DATE=9-26-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE N U M B E R S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 IP ?o 21 



9 


7 


10 


7 


10 


13 


9 


8 


8 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


6 


6 


6 


7 


8 


6 


-1 


4 


3 


5 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


3 


6 


3 


4 


5 


5 


7 


8 


-1 


3 


6 


3 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


5 


5 


7 


8 


6 


6 


6 


8 


R 


4 


3 


6 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


? 


2 


-1 


4 


5 


6 


8 


4 


5 


5 


6 


8 


3 


3 


5 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


5 


7 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


3 


7 


4 


3 


7 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


8 


6 


8 


10 


6 


7 


8 


8 


10 


3 


7 


10 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


R 


12 


16 


6 


7 


8 


in 


13 


3 


3 


9 


6 



3-1 3 3-1 5 8 11 15 6 8 8 10 13 3 3 10 



DATE=9-27-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 



PROBE NUMBERS 
8 9 10 11 12 1.3 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

456787778*33-1-1 



3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


5 


6 


7 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


? 


2 


6 


-1 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


R 


4 


5 


5 


7 


R 


3 


2 


7 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


6 


7 


R 


11 


11 


3 


3 


Q 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


7 


q 


10 


15 


19 


R 


9 


10 


12 


14 


R 


3 


12 


7 


3 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


8 


12 


16 


2^ 


R 


10 


11 


14 


15 


3 


3 


13 


R 



194 



PAGE 3 

SAN OIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 



n>ATE=9-28-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



5 



PROBE NUMBERS 
« 9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 18 19 ?0 21 



3 


3 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


s 


6 


7 


8 


8 


6 


7 


8 


8 


8 


4 


3 


6 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


4 


s 


6 


6 


8 


3 


3 


ft 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


S 


7 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


3 


6 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


6 


6 


8 


Q 


S 


7 


8 


8 


10 


3 


4 


8 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


10 


7 


-1 


12 


IS 


6 


7 


8 


10 


12 


? 


3 


10 


S 


3 


3 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


14 


8 


1? 


13 


19 


6 


8 


Q 


11 


7 


3 


2 


11 


7 



PATE=10-2-72 



STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OP HRS= 4 



PROBE NUMBERS 

8 Q 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 



2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


5 


-1 


-1 


-1 


3 


3 


3 


4 


S 


-1 


-1 


3 


3 


2 


2 


-1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


4 


S 


ft 


-1 


-1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


S 


ft 


7 


8 


a 


7 


7 


8 


8 


-1 


-1 


7 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


8 


9 


12 


-I 


-1 


8 


11 


14 


14 


14 


-1 


-1 


10 


ft 



DATE=10-3-72 



3 



STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OF HRS= 5 



PROBE NUMBERS 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 1ft 17 18 19 20 PI 22 



3 
2 
2 
3 

3 



3 
3 
2 
2 

3 



3 5686568 
^ ^ 4-1-1 5 7 8 

226ft 10 788 

1 2 12 IS IS 10 13 14 



4 


ft 


6 


^ 


3 


4 


3 


3 


a 


4 


3 


3 


4 


ft 


6 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


S 


ft 


8 


3 


4 


S 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


7 


10 


11 


S 


7 


7 


3 


4 


5 


3 


3 


3 



2 



8 14 



2 
2 

3 
3 
2 



DATE=10-4-72 



2 



7 



113 4 6 
2 2 5 7 b 
2 2 8 11 12 
1 1 8 10 14 



STARTING HR= 130H 



NO. OF HR^= 5 



PROBE NUMBERS 
8 9 10 11 1? 13 14 IS 16 17 1R 1Q 20 21 ">?. 

456-14'4^3^?22' :> 22 

3 4 6 3-1 4 3 35222^2? 
68857844643 3^33 
6796884-164 3 4333 

8 911 5 9 ^ 4-1 7 5 4 4-1 4 3 



195 



page 4 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122ND AVE 

DATE=10-5-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1R 19 20 21 2? 

6 R 8 R 10 15 15 26 15 14 R 13 R R 7 7 7 6 6 12 6 9 



6 


6 


6 


6 


11 


12 


13 


10 


11 


12 


-1 


10 


11 


R 


R 


R 


7 


7 


R 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


11 


12 


14 


11. 


13 


14 


10 


10 


12 


8 


R 


9 


R 


R 


R 


. 7 


R 


8 


6 


6 


6 


6 


12 


14 


15 


12 


14 


15 


11 


14 


14 


R 


10 


16 


9 


9 


9 


R 


8 


8 


6 


4 


4 


5 


15 


20 


23 


15 


16 


17 


11 


14 


14 


R 


9 


11 


R 


R 


8 


8 


7 


8 


5 


4 


5 


6 


16 


23 


26 


15 


17 


19 


12 


15 


15 


9 


11 


12 


R 


R 


9 


-1 


8 


R 



DATE^lO-6-72 STARTING HR= 700 NO. OF HRS= 5 

PROBE NUMBERS 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 1.6 17 18 19 20 21 22 

33 33 33 33 31 40 40 -1 34 36 27 31 M 23 -1 28 23 31 26 2? 24 26 

36 39 39 42 42 4a 46 38 40 40 32 41 34 3^ 33 34 34 35 33 35 33 35 

24 31 33 3^ 36 32 38 31 2R 2Q 29 -1 26 29 26 20 31 26 28 26 28 2R 

11 14 2? 19 2? 18 22 14 14 15 14 14 13 14 14 -1 8 12 14 6 14 16 

7 11 8 10 14 14 14 10 9 9 R 7 7 6 6 6 5 6 5 5 5 5 



DATE=10-10-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO, OF HRS= 5 

PROBE NUMBERS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 14 15 16 17 lft 19 20 21 22 



3 


4 


3 


3 


8 


R 


q 


R 


R 


9 


7 


7 


7 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


8 


8 


9 


8 


R 


Q 


6 


6 


R 


4 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


9 


R 


9 


8 


R 


R 


7 


7 


R 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


12 


12 


8 


9 


q 


q 


R 


R 


R 


6 


6 


6 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


-1 


16 


20 


8 


R 


-1 


9 


-1 


11 


7 


R 


R 


5 


7 


6 


4 


4 


4 



DATE=10-1 1-72 STARTING HR= 1200 NO. OF HRS= 6 

PROBE NUMBERS 
3 4 5 6 7 R 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

3 4-1 5 2? 8 8 c 

7 8 8 
6 R R 

8 9 11 
R 10 12 



196 



3 


3 


3 


3 


7 


-1 


10 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


7 


R 


3 


3 


3 


3 


8 


8 


9 


4 


3 


3 


3 


9 


10 


10 


4 


4 


3 


3 


9 


12 


16 



7 


9 


8 


5 


6 


6 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


1. 


6 


8 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


8 


7 


7 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


7 


8 


9 


5 


6 


8 


5 


5 


5 


6 


4 


4 


R 


10 


11 


6 


8 


8 


5 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


R 


11 


11 


7 


8 


9 


6 


7 


7 


5 


5 


5 






PAGE 5 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY (3 122ND AVE 



DATE=10-.1.2-7P STARTING HR = 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 



1 



3 



7 



3 s 4P -1 29 -1 -1 -1 

19 26 -1 2^ 22 2^ 25 

14 IP 19 20 1^ -1 -1 

a n 14 15 1 U 14. 11 

9 13 12 13 11 14 -1 

6 R 9 11 9 10 8 





PRO 


R E 


N I 


1 M 


REP 


s 












8 


9 10 


I 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


PI 


?2 


Q 


23 2^ 


18 


P5 


P0 


17 


24 1 7 


21 


28 


19 


P5 


19 


33 


17 


17 18 


18 


20 


14 


14 


14 14 


1 4 


14 


17 


14 


14 


14 


13 


13 13 


12 


12 


1 ^ 


1 P 


12 12 


13 


1 1 


12 


1 P. 


1 7 


13 


Q 


10 in 


Q 


1 


q 


a 


9,-1 


8 


a 


a 


8 


a 


Q 


8 


8 8 


1 


7 


,q 


7 


7 8 


8 


7 


6 


7 


8 


7 



6 6 



197 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAT 13 122N0 AVE 
SEPTEMBER 20 '1972 TO OCTOBER 12*1972 
BEARINGS N 10 32'09 W E 

5 LANES NORTHBOUND— '4 LANES SOUTHBOUND 
22 FT MEDIAN 

15 FT FILL SECTION 

WIDTH OF ROADWAY = 150 FT 

SIDE SLOPES = 1.5S1 

TRAFFIC DATA 



DATE=9-20-72 STARTING HHT 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





NORTHBOU 


NO 




SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8610 


• 11 


63 


8151 


• 06 




70 


16761 


67 


8180 


.10 


66 


7/94 


• 08 




70 


15974 


68 


6440 


.07 


70 


5786 


.05 




70 


12228 


70 


5436 


.05 


70 


54 70 


.05 




70 


10906 


70 


5274 


.05 


70 


5506 


.05 




70 


10780 


70 



DATE=9-21-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRSr 6 





NOR THBOU 


ND 




SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


ypH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8738 


• 11 


64 


8181 


.09 




70 


16919 


67 


7921 


• 10 


64 


7572 


• 08 




70 


15493 


67 


6160 


• 06 


70 


5704 


.05 




70 


11864 


70 


5247 


.05 


70 


5428 


.05 




70 


10675 


70 


5021 


• 05 


70 


5550 


.05 




70 


10571 


70 


4895 


• 05 


70 


5314 


.05 




70 


10209 


70 



DATE=9-22-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC» 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8587 


• 11 




63 


8004 


.09 




70 


16591 


66 


7891 


• 09 




70 


7406 


.08 




70 


15297 


70 


6381 


.07 




70 


5582 


.05 




70 


11963 


70 


5293 


• 05 




70 


5305 


.05 




70 


10598 


70 


5494 


• 05 




70 


5618 


.05 




70 


11112 


70 


5511 


• 05 




70 


6002 


• 05 




70 


11513 


70 



198 



PAGE 2 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 13 122N0 AVE 



DAIE=9-25-72 STARTING HK= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NOK THBOUNO 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8805 


.11 




65 


8134 


.09 




70 


16939 


67 


8.306 


.10 




67 


7419 


• 06 




70 


15725 


69 


6208 


• 06 




70 


5145 


.05 




70 


11353 


70 


5144 


.05 




70 


4985 


.05 




70 


10129 


70 


4718 


.05 




70 


5189 


.05 




70 


9907 


70 


4776 


• OS 




70 


5371 


.05 




70 


10147 


70 



DATE=9-26-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4462 


• 05 




70 


5050 


.05 




70 


9512 


70 


4541 


• 05 




70 


5340 


.05 




70 


9881 


70 


5163 


• 05 




70 


6256 


• 06 




70 


11419 


70 


6577 


• 08 




67 


8355 


• 15 




56 


14932 


61 


7306 


.09 




66 


7988 


.25 




32 


15294 


48 


7564 


.09 




68 


7385 


.28 




27 


14949 


48 



DATE=9-27-72 STARTING HH^z 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4648 


.05 




70 


5185 


• 05 




70 


9833 


70 


4650 


• 05 




70 


5441 


• 05 




70 


10091 


70 


5360 


.05 




70 


6324 


• 06 




70 


11684 


70 


6895 


• 06 




70 


8355 


.17 




50 


15250 


59 


6869 


• 08 




70 


7818 


.27 




29 


14687 


48 


7699 


.09 




69 


7171 


.32 




23 


14870 


47 



199 



PAGE 3 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 122N0 AVE 

DATE=9-28-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEEO 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4608 


• 05 




70 


5271 


.05 




70 


9879 


70 


4625 


.05 




70 


5570 


• 05 




70 


10195 


70 


5435 


.05 




70 


6486 


• 07 




70 


11921 


70 


6630 


• 06 




67 


8480 


• 11 




70 


15110 


69 


74 73 


.09 




67 


7731 


• 26 




30 


15204 


48 


7669 


.10 




62 


7118 


• 33 




22 


14807 


43 



OATE=10-2-72 STARTING HH^ 1300 



NO. OF HRS= 4 





NORTHBOU 


ND 




SOUTHBOUND 


TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


^PH 


SPEED 


4456 


• 05 


70 


5204 


• 05 


70 


9660 


70 


5166 


• 05 


70 


6026 


• 06 


70 


11192 


70 


6461 


.07 


70 


8249 


• 13 


64 


14710 


67 


7026 


• 08 


70 


7499 


.32 


24 


14525 


46 



DArE=10-3-72 STARTING HR= 1300 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 




OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4319 


• 05 




70 


5084 




.05 




70 


9403 


70 


5044 


.05 




70 


6111 




.06 




70 


11155 


70 


6433 


.07 




fO 


8236 




.14 




60 


14669 


64 


7167 


• 08 




70 


7554 




.31 




25 


14721 


47 


7493 


.09 




67 


7055 




.34 




21 


14548 


45 




DATE=10-< 


4-72 


STARTING HRs 


1300 




NO. OF 


HRS= 5 






NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 




OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4479 


.05 




70 


5599 




• 05 




70 


10078 


70 


5381 


• 05 




70 


6726 




• 05 




70 


12107 


70 


6646 


.07 




70 


8308 




• 07 




70 


14954 


70 


7301 


.09 




66 


9251 




.09 




70 


16552 


68 


7649 


.09 




69 


9561 




.09 




70 


17210 


69 



200 



PAGE 4 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY Q 122ND AVE 



DATE=10-5-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPN 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4646 


• 05 




70 


5350 


.05 




70 


9996 


70 


4698 


• 05 




70 


5604 


.05 




70 


10302 


70 


5427 


.05 




70 


6286 


.06 




70 


11713 


70 


6840 


• 08 




69 


8246 


.17 




49 


15U86 


58 


7247 


.09 




65 


7486 


• 32 




24 


14733 


44 


7591 


• 10 




61 


6688 


.35 




19 


14279 


42 



DATE=10-6-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


8729 


.13 




54 


7966 


.10 




70 


16695 


62 


7814 


• 11 




58 


7287 


.09 




70 


15101 


64 


6055 


• 08 




61 


5464 


.07 




70 


11519 


65 


5448 


.07 




63 


5251 


.07 




70 


10699 


66 


5399 


.07 




62 


5914 


.07 




70 


11313 


66 



DATE=10-10-72 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 5 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


ypH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


SPEED 


4615 


• 05 




70 


4950 


• 05 




70 


9565 


70 


4693 


.05 




70 


5400 


• 05 




70 


10093 


70 


5232 


• 05 




70 


6166 


• 06 




70 


11398 


70 


6718 


• 08 




68 


8470 


.14 




61 


15188 


64 


7163 


• 10 




58 


7328 


• 32 




23 


14491 


40 



DArE=10-ll-/2 STARTING HR= 1200 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





N0RTH80U 


NO 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


4645 


.05 


70 


4346 


• 04 


70 


4992 


• 05 


70 


6713 


• 08 


68 


7330 


.09 


66 


7525 


• 09 


66 



SOUTHBOUND 
VPH OCC. SPEED 



4999 


• 05 


70 


5240 


• 05 


70 


6346 


• 06 


70 


8401 


• 14 


61 


7656 


.31 


25 


7148 


.33 


22 


201 







TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


SPEED 


9644 


70 


9586 


70 


11338 


70 


15114 


64 


14986 


45 


14673 


45 



PAGE 5 

SAN DIEGO FREEWAY S 122N0 AVE 



OATE=10-12-72 STARTING HR= 700 



NO. OF HRS= 6 





NORTHBOUND 






SOUTHBOUND 




TOTAL 


AVG. 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


VPH 


OCC. 


SPEED 


yPH 


SPEED 


8751 


• 11 




64 


8175 


.09 




70 


16926 


67 


8168 


• 10 




66 


7505 


• 08 




70 


15673 


68 


5965 


• 06 




70 


5408 


• 05 




70 


11373 


70 


5000 


• 05 




70 


4948 


• 05 




70 


9948 


70 


5051 


• 05 




70 


5244 


.05 




70 


10295 


70 


4665 


• 05 




70 


5094 


.05 




70 


9759 


70 



202 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1977 0-728-952/1314 















^ 


3 !L ^ 




-n -n 
















o 


> O > W 




O 
















1 


• u> 




31 -- 

2 3 

m 

a o 
5 O 

H 
















*- 


<T\ 


/ 
















-p 

1- 

03 

n 


> 




Tl 

o -n 

XI 

? — ' 
















73 
73 

o 


§ 




o K 
















S: 


' 


















m 





DOT LIBRARY 




D0DS5E11 



FHWA 



R&D